<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Nothing but Blue Skies (novel by McGuane)

    Thomas McGuane: …Keep the Change (1989), and Nothing but Blue Skies (1992). After a hiatus from writing novels, McGuane returned with The Cadence of Grass (2002), which depicts a Montana clan’s colourfully tangled lives. It was followed by Driving on the Rim (2010), a freewheeling tale of a small-town doctor.

  • Nothing but the Truth (album by Blades)

    Rubén Blades: …released his first English-language album, Nothing but the Truth, which featured songs written or cowritten by Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, and Sting. His music echoed such social issues as the Iran-Contra affair and the AIDS crisis. Because of his success and activism, Blades became known as “the Latin Bruce Springsteen.”

  • Nothing Important Ever Dies (novel by Gary)

    Romain Gary: …first work, L’éducation européenne (1945; Forest of Anger), won him immediate acclaim. Humanistic and optimistic despite its graphic depictions of the horrors of World War II, the novel was later revised and reissued in English as Nothing Important Ever Dies (1960).

  • Nothing in Nature Is Private (poetry by Rankine)

    Claudia Rankine: …her debut collection of poems, Nothing in Nature Is Private, Rankine emerged as an innovative and provocative voice in contemporary poetry. Her second collection, The End of the Alphabet, appeared in 1998, followed by Plot (2001), a book-length poem that narrated the experience of pregnancy and childbirth. Don’t Let Me…

  • Nothing Like a Dame (film by Michell [2018])

    Joan Plowright: …Eileen Atkins in the documentary Nothing Like a Dame (2018; also called Tea with the Dames).

  • …Nothing like the Sun (album by Sting)

    Sting: Solo career: Sting’s next album, …Nothing like the Sun (1987), included collaborations with Eric Clapton and with former bandmate Summers and hits such as “Fragile,” “We’ll Be Together,” “Englishman in New York,” and “Be Still My Beating Heart.”

  • Nothing New Under the Sun (novels by Bacchelli)

    The Mill on the Po, trilogy of novels by Riccardo Bacchelli, first published in Italian as Il mulino del Po in 1938–40. The work, considered Bacchelli’s masterpiece, dramatizes the conflicts and struggles of several generations of a family of millers. The first two volumes, Dio ti salve (1938; “God

  • Nothing Sacred (film by Wellman [1937])

    William Wellman: Films of the late 1930s: …in its own right was Nothing Sacred (1937), a scathing screwball comedy that featured what some believe to be Carole Lombard’s best performance and a surprisingly modern screenplay by Ben Hecht about media manipulation. Wellman returned to the skies with Men with Wings (1938), a Technicolor account of the early…

  • Nothing Sacred (work by Walker)

    Canadian literature: Drama: …impressive body of work, including Nothing Sacred (1988), an adaptation of Turgenev’s Father and Sons; Criminals in Love (1985), set in Toronto’s working-class east end; and Suburban Motel (1997), a cycle of six plays set in a motel room. Playwright and actor Morris Panych achieved renown for the nonverbal The…

  • Nothing to Be Frightened Of (memoir by Barnes)

    Julian Barnes: His memoir Nothing to Be Frightened Of (2008) is an honest, oftentimes jarringly critical look at his relationship with his parents and older brother. Levels of Life (2013)—which pays tribute to his wife, who died in 2008—is a series of linked essays. Barnes used the story of…

  • nothingness (philosophy)

    existentialism: Ontic structure of human existence: …(as possibility) appears as the nothingness of Being, as the negation of every reality of fact. In a brief but famous work, Was ist Metaphysik? (1929; What Is Metaphysics?), Heidegger affirmed that “Human existence cannot have a relationship with being unless it remains in the midst of nothingness.” Rudolf Carnap,…

  • nothingness (mysticism)

    Emptiness, in mysticism and religion, a state of “pure consciousness” in which the mind has been emptied of all particular objects and images; also, the undifferentiated reality (a world without distinctions and multiplicity) or quality of reality that the emptied mind reflects or manifests. The

  • Nothobranchius furzeri (fish species)

    killifish: Nothobranchius kadleci and N. furzeri, two species inhabiting rain-filled seasonal ponds in East Africa, have the shortest generation time (approximately 1 month) of any vertebrate known. N. kadleci and N. furzeri become sexually mature at 17 days and 18 days, respectively, and the eggs of both species can…

  • Nothobranchius kadleci (fish species)

    killifish: Nothobranchius kadleci and N. furzeri, two species inhabiting rain-filled seasonal ponds in East Africa, have the shortest generation time (approximately 1 month) of any vertebrate known. N. kadleci and N. furzeri become sexually mature at 17 days and 18 days, respectively, and the eggs of…

  • Nothofagaceae (plant family)

    Fagales: Nothofagaceae: Nothofagaceae, or the southern or silver beech family, consists of 35 species of Nothofagus that are scattered throughout southern South America, Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, and the mountains of New Guinea. The history of the genus has frequently been cited as evidence of…

  • Nothofagus (plant)

    Fagales: Nothofagaceae: …consists of 35 species of Nothofagus that are scattered throughout southern South America, Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, and the mountains of New Guinea. The history of the genus has frequently been cited as evidence of continental drift after the breakup of the single large continent of Gondwana during the…

  • Nothofagus antarctica (plant)

    beech: The wavy-leaved Antarctic beech, or nire (Nothofagus antarctica), and the roble beech (N. obliqua), both 30-metre (98-foot) trees native to Chile and Argentina, differ from other species of false beech in being deciduous; they are planted as ornamentals on other continents. The pink-brown hardwood of the Antarctic…

  • Nothofagus cliffortioides (plant)
  • Nothofagus cunninghamii (tree)

    beech: …in New South Wales; the myrtle beech, Tasmanian myrtle, or Australian, or red, myrtle (N. cunninghamii), a 60-metre (197-foot) Tasmanian tree important for its fine-textured wood; the slender, columnar red beech (N. fusca) of New Zealand, about 30 metres tall; and the silver, or southland, beech (N. menziesii), a 30-metre…

  • Nothofagus fusca (tree, Nothofagus fusca)

    beech: …fine-textured wood; the slender, columnar red beech (N. fusca) of New Zealand, about 30 metres tall; and the silver, or southland, beech (N. menziesii), a 30-metre New Zealand tree with doubly and bluntly toothed leaves bearing small hairy pits beneath.

  • Nothofagus menziesii (plant)

    beech: …30 metres tall; and the silver, or southland, beech (N. menziesii), a 30-metre New Zealand tree with doubly and bluntly toothed leaves bearing small hairy pits beneath.

  • Nothofagus moorei (plant)

    beech: …the best known are the Australian beech (N. moorei), a 46-metre (151-foot) tree with leaves 7 cm (3 inches) long, found in New South Wales; the myrtle beech, Tasmanian myrtle, or Australian, or red, myrtle (N. cunninghamii), a 60-metre (197-foot) Tasmanian tree important for its fine-textured wood; the slender, columnar…

  • Nothofagus obliqua (tree)

    beech: …nire (Nothofagus antarctica), and the roble beech (N. obliqua), both 30-metre (98-foot) trees native to Chile and Argentina, differ from other species of false beech in being deciduous; they are planted as ornamentals on other continents. The pink-brown hardwood of the Antarctic beech is used in flooring and cabinetmaking. The…

  • Nothomb, Amélie (Belgian author)

    Belgian literature: Developments after World War II: …novelist of the 1990s was Amélie Nothomb, two of whose novels of the ’90s—Le Sabotage amoureux (1993; Loving Sabotage) and Stupeur et tremblements (1999; Fear and Trembling)—were translated into English at the turn of the 21st century.

  • Nothoprocta (bird genus)

    tinamou: Habitat selection and food habits: The members of the genus Nothoprocta are considered beneficial to agriculture because of their large consumption of insect pests. Young tinamous of all species are more dependent upon insects than are the adults. Unlike the gallinaceous birds, tinamous do not scratch for food, as is evident by their weak toes…

  • Nothoprocta ornata (bird)

    tinamou: Reproduction: In the ornate tinamou (Nothoprocta ornata) it is the females who perform courtship displays.

  • nothosaur (fossil reptile group)

    sauropterygian: Sauropterygians include the nothosaurs, the pistosaurs, and the plesiosaurs, all of which were remarkably well adapted to life in the water.

  • Nothosauria (fossil reptile group)

    sauropterygian: Sauropterygians include the nothosaurs, the pistosaurs, and the plesiosaurs, all of which were remarkably well adapted to life in the water.

  • Nothosaurus (fossil marine reptile)

    Nothosaurus, (genus Nothosaurus), marine reptiles found as fossils from the Triassic Period (251 million to 200 million years ago) in southwestern and eastern Asia, North Africa, and especially Europe. Nothosaurus was characterized by a slender body, long neck and tail, and long limbs. Although the

  • Nothura maculosa (bird)

    tinamou: Habitat selection and food habits: …primarily on seeds, but the spotted tinamou (Nothura maculosa) occasionally eats ticks in pastures. The forest-inhabiting solitary tinamou generally prefers small fruits and berries, collected on the ground. However, it may also devour a frog when it finds one. The members of the genus Nothoprocta are considered beneficial to agriculture…

  • notice pleading (law)

    procedural law: Pleadings: …rules now require only “notice pleadings,” in which the plaintiff gives “a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief” and the defendant gives a “short and plain” statement of his defenses. For most actions, there is no requirement that legal theory…

  • Notice sur les systèmes des montagnes (work by Beaumont)

    élie de Beaumont: In his work Notice sur les systèmes des montagnes (1852; “Review of Mountain Systems”), he summarized his theories on the origin of mountain ranges, attributing them to cataclysmic upheavals caused by the slow cooling and shrinking of the Earth.

  • Noticia de un secuestro (work by García Márquez)

    Gabriel García Márquez: Works: …Noticia de un secuestro (News of a Kidnapping).

  • Noticias del imperio (novel by Paso)

    Fernando del Paso: Noticias del imperio (1987; “News from the Empire”) is a re-creation of Mexican history, narrated in part by a madwoman who has witnessed 60 years of political and social upheaval, that blends realism with fantasy and horror; the novel has been called one of the…

  • Notidanoidei (shark suborder)

    chondrichthyan: Annotated classification: Suborder Notidanoidei Sharks having 6 or 7 gill openings. Anal fin present. Family Hexanchidae (cow sharks and 7-gilled sharks) Distinguished by presence of 6 gill slits; teeth of lower jaw strikingly unlike those of upper, the 5 or 6 on either side of the central tooth…

  • notifiable disease (public health)

    Notifiable disease, any of various health conditions that upon detection are required to be reported to public health authorities. For certain diseases, namely those of an infectious nature, mandatory disease reporting plays a critical role in preventing and controlling the spread of disease in

  • Notion of a Living Constitution, The (work by Rehnquist)

    William Rehnquist: In “The Notion of a Living Constitution” (1976), Rehnquist articulated the role of the court in a democratic society, concluding that judicial restraint and deference to lawmaking majorities are essential elements of a responsible judicial system. The liberal concept of a living constitution, he argued, constitutes…

  • Notions sur la machine analytique de Charles Babbage (article by Menabrea)

    Ada Lovelace: …de Charles Babbage” (1842; “Elements of Charles Babbage’s Analytical Machine”). Her detailed and elaborate annotations (especially her description of how the proposed Analytical Engine could be programmed to compute Bernoulli numbers) were excellent; “the Analytical Engine,” she said, “weaves algebraic patterns, just as the Jacquard-loom weaves flowers and leaves.”

  • Notitia Dignitatum (Roman document)

    Notitia Dignitatum, official list of all ancient Roman civil and military posts, surviving as a 1551 copy of the now-missing original. It is a major source of information on the administrative organization of the late Roman Empire—late 4th and early 5th centuries—and is divided into two sections,

  • Notizie d’opere del disegno (work by Michiel)

    Giorgione: Works: …art collections of Venice (Notizie d’opere del disegno), written between 1520 and 1543 by the Venetian patrician Marcantonio Michiel, contain references to pictures by Giorgione. This information occurs so shortly after the master’s death that it is considered generally reliable. Of the 12 paintings and 1 drawing listed, 5…

  • Notke, Bernt (German sculptor)

    Bernt Notke, sculptor, painter, and engraver who was one of the most important artists in eastern Germany and the surrounding area during the 15th century. His intense and expressionistic works were instrumental in the development of sculpture in Germany. In 1505 Notke was named Werkmeister of

  • Notker (bishop of Liège)

    Liège: Under Notger, its first prince-bishop, it grew in importance as a centre of Liège principality and of the Mosan school of art and as a major European intellectual centre. After it was granted a communal magistracy (1185) and citizens’ charter (1195), and the guilds were granted…

  • Notker Balbulus (monk of Saint Gall)

    Latin literature: The 9th to the 11th century: Notker Balbulus, monk of St. Gall, was not the first to compose sequences, but his Liber hymnorum (“Book of Hymns”), begun about 860, is an integrated collection of texts that spans the whole of the church year in an ordered cycle. Performed between the biblical…

  • Noto (Italy)

    Noto, town and episcopal see, southeastern Sicily, Italy. It lies on the southern slopes of the Hyblaei Hills southwest of Syracuse. Noto was founded in 1703 about 4 miles (7 km) southeast of the Siculan and Roman city of Netum, which was destroyed in the earthquake of 1693. The town’s 18th-century

  • Noto Peninsula (peninsula, Japan)

    Noto Peninsula, peninsula in Ishikawa ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, jutting into the Sea of Japan and enclosing Toyama Bay. The largest peninsula on the northern Honshu coast, it extends northward for 50 miles (80 km) and has a width of about 19 miles (30 km). The peninsula is separated from m

  • Noto-hantō (peninsula, Japan)

    Noto Peninsula, peninsula in Ishikawa ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, jutting into the Sea of Japan and enclosing Toyama Bay. The largest peninsula on the northern Honshu coast, it extends northward for 50 miles (80 km) and has a width of about 19 miles (30 km). The peninsula is separated from m

  • notochord (anatomy)

    Notochord, flexible rodlike structure of mesodermal cells that is the principal longitudinal structural element of chordates and of the early embryo of vertebrates, in both of which it plays an organizational role in nervous system development. In later vertebrate development, it becomes part of

  • Notodontidae (insect)

    Prominent moth, (family Notodontidae), any of a group of moths (order Lepidoptera) that are characterized by projecting wing tufts in the adult and dorsal humps in the larva. The nocturnal moths have stout, hairy bodies and somewhat narrow forewings. Most species are dull gray, yellow, or brown

  • Notogaea Realm (faunal region)

    biogeographic region: Notogaean realm: The Notogaean, or Australian, realm begins east of Lydekker’s Line and extends out into the Pacific Ocean (Figure 2). It consists of four regions: Australian, Oceanic, New Zealand, and Hawaiian. The faunas of many of the Pacific Islands, however, have as much in…

  • Notograptidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Notograptidae Eel-shaped; dorsal and anal fins long-based and high, both confluent with caudal fin; pelvics 1-rayed, filamentous, placed before pectorals; body scaled, mouth large. 3 species; marine; western Australia. Family Opistognathidae (jawfishes) Resemble Clinidae, but jaws large to huge, extending far past eye;

  • Notomastus (polychaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …cm; examples of genera: Capitella, Notomastus, Arenicola, Maldane, Axiothella. Order Flabelligerida Sedentary; setae of anterior segments directed forward to form a cephalic (head) cage; prostomium and peristome retractile, with 2 palpi and retractile branchiae; size, 1 to 10

  • Notonecta (insect genus)

    backswimmer: The genus Notonecta, distributed worldwide, may be quite destructive to fishes and tadpoles. It will bite humans when handled, the bite feeling somewhat like a bee sting. Its eggs are deposited either on or in the plant tissue of pond vegetation. The grousewinged backswimmer, N. undulata, found…

  • Notonecta undalata (insect)

    backswimmer: The grousewinged backswimmer, N. undulata, found in North America, can often be seen swimming under the ice during the winter.

  • Notonectidae (insect)

    Backswimmer, (family Notonectidae), any of a group of insects (order Heteroptera) that occur worldwide and are named for their ability to swim on their backs, which are shaped like the keel and sides of a boat. The backswimmer uses its long oarlike legs for propulsion and has an oval-shaped head

  • Notophthalamus (amphibian genus)

    Caudata: Annotated classification: and Salamandra in Europe, Notophthalamus and Taricha in North America, and Cynops in Japan) and about 120 species. There is disagreement concerning the classification of salamanders below the ordinal level. Some authorities recognize no suborders, and some separate the genus

  • Notoptera (insect)

    Ice bug, (order Grylloblatodea), any of approximately 25 species of rare and primitive insects found in the mountains of Japan, western North America, and eastern Siberia. A pale, wingless creature 15 to 30 mm (0.6 to 1.2 inches) long, it has biting mouthparts, long antennae, and small compound

  • notopterid (fish)

    Notopterid, any of about eight species of air-breathing, freshwater fishes constituting the family Notopteridae, found in quiet waters from Africa to Southeast Asia. Notopterids are long-bodied, small-scaled fishes with a small dorsal fin (if present) and a long, narrow anal fin that runs along

  • Notopteridae (fish)

    Notopterid, any of about eight species of air-breathing, freshwater fishes constituting the family Notopteridae, found in quiet waters from Africa to Southeast Asia. Notopterids are long-bodied, small-scaled fishes with a small dorsal fin (if present) and a long, narrow anal fin that runs along

  • Notopteroidei (fish suborder)

    osteoglossomorph: Annotated classification: Suborder Notopteroidei Swim bladder connected with the skull; semicircular canals separate from lower part of ear or, if connected, utriculus greatly enlarged; no electric organs. ?Family Lycopteridae Small freshwater fishes resembling hiodontiforms. 4 genera, 6 species. Early Cretaceous of northeastern Asia. Family

  • Notorious (film by Hitchcock [1946])

    Alfred Hitchcock: The Hollywood years: Rebecca to Dial M for Murder: Notorious (1946) was much more polished. Written for the screen by Hecht, the espionage plot of Nazis in Rio de Janeiro and a hidden cache of uranium was secondary to the romance story. Alicia Huberman (Bergman), the dissolute daughter of a convicted Nazi spy, is…

  • Notorious B.I.G. (American rapper)

    Notorious B.I.G. (Christopher Wallace; "Biggie Smalls", ), American rap singer whose transformation from drug dealer and street hustler to one of hip-hop’s premier artists was chronicled in his platinum-selling debut album, Ready to Die (1994); weeks before the release of his second album, Life

  • Notorious Byrd Brothers, The (album by the Byrds)

    the Byrds: …1967 during the making of The Notorious Byrd Brothers (1968). Parsons, who had attempted a country-rock marriage with his previous group, the International Submarine Band, was a Byrd for only five months in 1968. Nevertheless, Parsons’s Southern background and his passion for rural American music, including gospel and rhythm and…

  • Notorious Landlady, The (screenplay by Gelbart and Edwards)

    Blake Edwards: Early life and work: …Operation Mad Ball (1957) and The Notorious Landlady (1962). At the same time, he began writing for television. His first films as a director were Bring Your Smile Along (1955) and He Laughed Last (1956), both of which starred Frankie Laine and were also written by Edwards. Other early efforts…

  • Notornis mantelli (bird)

    Takahe, (species Notornis mantelli), rare flightless bird of New Zealand that was thought to have become extinct in the late 1800s but that was rediscovered in 1948 in several remote valleys on South Island. Related to the gallinules (family Rallidae), it is a colourful species with brilliant blue

  • Notoryctemorphia (marsupial order)

    marsupial: Classification: Order Notoryctemorphia (marsupial moles) Family Notoryctidae 2 species in 1 genus found in the deserts of central and western Australia. Order Microbiotheria (monito) Family

  • Notoryctes caurinus (mammal)

    marsupial mole: typhlops and the 10-centimetre (4-inch) N. caurinus (by some not separated from N. typhlops) are remarkably like true moles. The forefeet bear triangular claws used in digging, and the skin of the blunt snout and stubby tail is leathery. The eyes are poorly developed and virtually hidden in the long…

  • Notoryctes typhlops (mammal)

    marsupial mole: …marsupial mammals of the genus Notoryctes, comprising the family Notoryctidae. Found in hot sandy wastes of south-central and northwestern Australia, the 18-centimetre (7-inch) N. typhlops and the 10-centimetre (4-inch) N. caurinus (by some not separated from N. typhlops) are remarkably like true moles. The forefeet bear triangular claws used in…

  • Notoryctidae (marsupial)

    Marsupial mole, either of the two species of small marsupial mammals of the genus Notoryctes, comprising the family Notoryctidae. Found in hot sandy wastes of south-central and northwestern Australia, the 18-centimetre (7-inch) N. typhlops and the 10-centimetre (4-inch) N. caurinus (by some not

  • Notostraca (branchiopod crustacean)

    Tadpole shrimp, (order Notostraca), any member of a small group of crustaceans (subclass Branchiopoda, phylum Arthropoda), composed of the genera Triops and Lepidurus. The approximately 10 known species are strictly freshwater forms, inhabiting lakes, ponds, and temporary pools, chiefly in Europe

  • notostracan (branchiopod crustacean)

    Tadpole shrimp, (order Notostraca), any member of a small group of crustaceans (subclass Branchiopoda, phylum Arthropoda), composed of the genera Triops and Lepidurus. The approximately 10 known species are strictly freshwater forms, inhabiting lakes, ponds, and temporary pools, chiefly in Europe

  • Notothenia rossii (fish)

    Antarctica: Biological resources: …of one species of Antarctic cod (Notothenia rossii) have been as high as 400,000 tons, prompting concerns about overfishing in Antarctic waters.

  • Nototheniidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Nototheniidae (Antarctic cods) Miocene to present; 17 genera with about 50 species, most in subantarctic waters; some species near Antarctic continent; a few in cold temperate zone, 1 species in rivers of southern South America. Mainly bottom dwellers of littoral zone, some deepwater species resemble…

  • Notothenioidea (fish superfamily)

    Antarctica: Sea life: …species belong to the superfamily Notothenioidea, the Antarctic perches. At sea bottom there are also the Zoarcidae, or eel-pouts; the Liparidae, or sea snails; the Macrouridae, or rat-tailed fishes; and the Gadidae, or codlike fishes. Rare nonbony types in the Antarctic zone include hagfish and skates. Many species of deep-sea…

  • Notothenioidei (fish suborder)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Suborder Notothenioidei 5 families of codlike or sculpinlike percoids found mainly in the Antarctic, some in cold temperate Southern Hemisphere seas near Chile, Argentina, and New Zealand; suborder includes about 75 percent of all Antarctic fishes. Family Bovichthyidae About 11 species in subantarctic and south temperate…

  • Notothyladales (plant order)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: Order Notothyladales Consists of a single family and about 5 genera, including Notothylas. Order Phymatocerotales Consists of a single family and a single genus (Phymatoceros) with 2 species. Division Bryophyta (mosses

  • Notothylas (plant genus)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: …the sporangium ages, sometimes (in Notothylas) by decomposition of the sporangium jacket. Order Anthocerotales Characteristics are those of the class; widely distributed in temperate to tropical latitudes, with greatest diversity in the tropics and subtropics; containing 1 family and 6 or 7 genera. Order Dendrocerotales

  • Notoungulata (fossil mammal)

    Notoungulata, extinct group of hoofed mammals found as fossils, mostly in South America, although the oldest forms seem to have originated in East Asia. Notoungulates lived from the late Paleocene Epoch (about 57 million years ago) to the early part of the Pleistocene Epoch (some 1.8 million years

  • notoungulate (fossil mammal)

    Notoungulata, extinct group of hoofed mammals found as fossils, mostly in South America, although the oldest forms seem to have originated in East Asia. Notoungulates lived from the late Paleocene Epoch (about 57 million years ago) to the early part of the Pleistocene Epoch (some 1.8 million years

  • Notre Dame Bay (inlet, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Notre Dame Bay, inlet (55 miles [90 km] wide) of the Atlantic Ocean, indenting the northern coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, for 50 miles. It has an irregular shoreline and contains many islands. Fishing villages are scattered along the coast of the

  • Notre Dame box (sports)

    gridiron football: Knute Rockne and the influence of coaches: …and ’30s was Knute Rockne’s Notre Dame box, his refinement of the shift from the T to a box-shaped formation that was first developed by Stagg. A series of rule changes eventually rendered the box shift ineffective, but Rockne, football’s first celebrity coach, was less an innovator than a master…

  • Notre Dame Cathedral (cathedral, Luxembourg, Luxembourg)

    Luxembourg: Notre-Dame Cathedral, a Gothic-style church, contains the tomb of John the Blind, king of Bohemia and count of Luxembourg from 1310 to 1346. Several members of the royal family and noted bishops are buried in the crypt.

  • Notre Dame de Namur, Sisters of (religious order)

    Sister Julia McGroarty: …first American superior in the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, whose efforts increased the scope and quality of Roman Catholic education in the United States.

  • Notre Dame Mountains (mountains, Canada)

    Notre Dame Mountains, mountain range in eastern Quebec province, Canada. The mountains are a continuation of the Green Mountains of Vermont, U.S., and an outcrop of the northern Appalachians. Named by Samuel de Champlain, the French explorer, they extend for about 500 miles (800 km) in a

  • Notre Dame, Cathedral of (cathedral, Tournai, Belgium)

    Tournai: Tournai’s Cathedral of Notre Dame is a cruciform 11th–12th-century basilica, one of the finest in Europe, with five massive towers, a Gothic choir, and 13th-century reliquary shrines; it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2000. The city contains other notable medieval churches. Among other…

  • Notre Dame, Church of (church, Kortrijk, Belgium)

    Kortrijk: The Church of Notre Dame (Onze Lieve Vrouwkerk; 1191–1211), with the attached chapel of the counts of Flanders (1374), contains Anthony Van Dyck’s “Elevation of the Cross” (1631) and a 14th-century statue of St. Catherine. Other historic landmarks in Kortrijk include the Broelbrug (bridge; c. 1400),…

  • Notre Dame, University of (university, Notre Dame, Indiana, United States)

    University of Notre Dame, private institution of higher learning in Notre Dame (adjacent to South Bend), Indiana, U.S. It is affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church. Formerly a men’s university, it became coeducational in 1972. Comprising colleges of arts and letters, science, engineering, and

  • N?tre, André Le (French landscape architect)

    André Le N?tre, one of the greatest French landscape architects, his masterpiece being the gardens of Versailles. Le N?tre grew up in an atmosphere of technical expertise. His father, Jean Le N?tre, was the master gardener of King Louis XIII at the Tuileries. At the studio of painter Fran?ois

  • Notre-Dame (church, Le Raincy, France)

    hall church: …is Auguste Perret’s church of Notre-Dame (1922–23), at Le Raincy, Fr., one of the first buildings and the first church to display the expressive structural possibilities of reinforced concrete.

  • Notre-Dame at Reims, Cathedral of (cathedral, Reims, France)

    Reims Cathedral, cathedral located in the city of Reims, France, on the Vesle River east-northeast of Paris. Reims was the site of 25 coronations of the kings of France, from Louis VIII in 1223 to Charles X in 1825, including the crowning of Charles VII in 1429 in the presence of Joan of Arc. The

  • Notre-Dame Cathedral (cathedral, Paris, France)

    Notre-Dame de Paris, cathedral church in Paris. It is the most famous of the Gothic cathedrals of the Middle Ages and is distinguished for its size, antiquity, and architectural interest. Notre-Dame lies at the eastern end of the ?le de la Cité and was built on the ruins of two earlier churches,

  • Notre-Dame d’Amiens (cathedral, Amiens, France)

    Amiens Cathedral, Gothic cathedral located in the historic city of Amiens, France, in the Somme River valley north of Paris. It is the largest of the three great Gothic cathedrals built in France during the 13th century, and it remains the largest in France. It has an exterior length of 476 feet

  • Notre-Dame de Chartres (cathedral, Chartres, France)

    Chartres Cathedral, Gothic cathedral located in the town of Chartres, northwestern France. Generally ranked as one of the three chief examples of Gothic French architecture (along with Amiens Cathedral and Reims Cathedral), it is noted not only for its architectural innovations but also for its

  • Notre-Dame de l’Espérance, Basilica of (basilica, Charleville-Mézières, France)

    Charleville-Mézières: The Basilica of Notre-Dame de l’Espérance has a Gothic choir and nave, but the bell tower dates from the Renaissance.

  • Notre-Dame de Paris (cathedral, Paris, France)

    Notre-Dame de Paris, cathedral church in Paris. It is the most famous of the Gothic cathedrals of the Middle Ages and is distinguished for its size, antiquity, and architectural interest. Notre-Dame lies at the eastern end of the ?le de la Cité and was built on the ruins of two earlier churches,

  • Notre-Dame de Paris (novel by Hugo)

    The Hunchback of Notre Dame, historical novel by Victor Hugo, originally published in French in 1831 as Notre-Dame de Paris (“Our Lady of Paris”). The Hunchback of Notre Dame is set in Paris during the 15th century. The story centres on Quasimodo, the deformed bell ringer of Notre-Dame Cathedral,

  • Notre-Dame of Amiens, Cathedral of (cathedral, Amiens, France)

    Amiens Cathedral, Gothic cathedral located in the historic city of Amiens, France, in the Somme River valley north of Paris. It is the largest of the three great Gothic cathedrals built in France during the 13th century, and it remains the largest in France. It has an exterior length of 476 feet

  • Notre-Dame school (music)

    Notre-Dame school, during the late 12th and early 13th centuries, an important group of composers and singers working under the patronage of the great Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris. The Notre-Dame school is important to the history of music because it produced the earliest repertory of

  • Notre-Dame, cathedral of (cathedral, Reims, France)

    Reims Cathedral, cathedral located in the city of Reims, France, on the Vesle River east-northeast of Paris. Reims was the site of 25 coronations of the kings of France, from Louis VIII in 1223 to Charles X in 1825, including the crowning of Charles VII in 1429 in the presence of Joan of Arc. The

  • Notre-Dame, Cathedral of (cathedral, Coutances, France)

    Coutances: …town is dominated by the Cathedral of Notre-Dame, built on the site of a church consecrated about 1090. The present structure is mainly 13th-century Gothic, with slender turrets massed around conspicuous towers. In the interior there are fine rose windows with the stained glass of the 14th century. One of…

  • Notre-Dame, Cathedral of (cathedral, Noyon, France)

    Noyon: Its Cathedral of Notre-Dame is a fine transitional late 12th-century Romanesque-Gothic edifice. The fifth church to be built on the site, it was restored after heavy damage in World War I. The H?tel de Ville (town hall) and old ecclesiastical buildings were also ruined in the…

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看