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  • nouvelle Carthage, La (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: …novel, La nouvelle Carthage (1888; The New Carthage), set in Antwerp, is saved only by the brilliance of its various episodes.

  • nouvelle Carthage, La (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: …novel, La nouvelle Carthage (1888; The New Carthage), set in Antwerp, is saved only by the brilliance of its various episodes.

  • nouvelle critique (French literature)

    French literature: La Nouvelle Critique (French New Criticism): ” The new and subversive critical tendencies of the 1960s demanded more of the reader, who was to become an active participant in decoding the text, not a passive recipient. The term New Criticism (not to be confused with the Anglo-American New Criticism, developed…

  • nouvelle cuisine (gastronomy)

    Nouvelle cuisine, (French: “new cuisine”) eclectic style in international cuisine, originating in France during the 1960s and ’70s, that stressed freshness, lightness, and clarity of flavour and inspired new movements in world cuisine. In reaction to some of the richer and more-calorie-laden

  • Nouvelle découverte d’un très grand pays situé dans l’Amérique (work by Hennepin)

    Louis Hennepin: …full account of his exploits, Description de la Louisiane (1683), later revised as Nouvelle découverte d’un très grand pays situé dans l’Amérique (1697; “New Discovery of a Very Large Country Situated in America”), in which he claimed to have explored the Mississippi to its mouth. This bold assumption was, however,…

  • Nouvelle Géographie universelle, la terre et les hommes, La (work by Reclus)

    élisée Reclus: (1875–94; The Earth and Its Inhabitants, 1878–94), is profusely illustrated with maps, plans, and engravings and characterized by a brillance of exposition that gives his work permanent scientific value.

  • nouvelle Hélo?se, La (work by Rousseau)

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Years of seclusion and exile: …ou, la nouvelle Hélo?se (1761; Julie; or, The New Eloise) came out within 12 months, all three works of seminal importance. The New Eloise, being a novel, escaped the censorship to which the other two works were subject; indeed, of all his books it proved to be the most widely…

  • Nouvelle Lambèse (Algeria)

    Batna, city, northeastern Algeria. It lies along the Wadi Tilatou and is situated on a well-watered plain that is bounded on the south by the Aurès Massif and on the north by the Batna Mountains. To the west, the cedar-forested Mount Tougour (Pic des Cèdres) rises to 6,870 feet (2,094 metres).

  • Nouvelle Mission de Judex, La (film by Feuillade)

    Louis Feuillade: Judex (1916) and La Nouvelle Mission de Judex (1917–18; “The New Mission of Judex”) feature Judex, the daring detective with the sweeping black cape, a righter of wrongs who was the prototype of many future film heroes. The tremendous success of these pictures saved the French film industry,…

  • Nouvelle Nouvelle Revue fran?aise, La (French review)

    La Nouvelle Revue fran?aise, leading French review of literature and the other arts. It was founded in February 1909 (after a false start in November 1908) by a group that included André Gide, Jacques Copeau, and Jean Schlumberger. The NRF’s founders wished to emphasize aesthetic issues and to

  • Nouvelle Relève, La (French-Canadian magazine)

    Robert Charbonneau: …friend Paul Beaulieu, he founded La Relève (later called La Nouvelle Relève, “The New Relief”), a nationalist review of art, literature, and philosophy (it ceased publication in 1948). In 1940 he and Claude Hurtubise established the publishing house éditions de l’Arbre. Over the years, Charbonneau worked as a journalist for…

  • Nouvelle Revue de Paris (French magazine)

    Gustave Flaubert: Mature career: …who had founded the periodical Revue de Paris, urged him to make haste, but he would not. The novel, with the subtitle Moeurs de province (“Provincial Customs”), eventually appeared in installments in the Revue from October 1 to December 15, 1856. The French government then brought the author to trial…

  • Nouvelle Revue Fran?aise, La (French review)

    La Nouvelle Revue fran?aise, leading French review of literature and the other arts. It was founded in February 1909 (after a false start in November 1908) by a group that included André Gide, Jacques Copeau, and Jean Schlumberger. The NRF’s founders wished to emphasize aesthetic issues and to

  • Nouvelle Vague (French film style)

    New Wave, the style of a number of highly individualistic French film directors of the late 1950s. Preeminent among New Wave directors were Louis Malle, Claude Chabrol, Fran?ois Truffaut, Alain Resnais, and Jean-Luc Godard, most of whom were associated with the film magazine Cahiers du cinéma, the

  • Nouvelle-Calédonie (island, New Caledonia)

    New Caledonia, largest island of the French overseas country of New Caledonia, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean 750 miles (1,200 km) east of Australia. Also known as Grande Terre (Mainland), it is approximately 250 miles (400 km) long and 25 miles (40 km) wide. From its coast, encircled by one of

  • Nouvelle-Calédonie (French unique collectivity, Pacific Ocean)

    New Caledonia, French unique collectivity in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, about 900 miles (1,500 km) east of Australia. It includes the island of New Caledonia (the Grande Terre [Mainland]), where the capital, Nouméa, is located; the Loyalty Islands; the Bélep Islands; and the ?le des Pins.

  • Nouvelle-France (French colonies, North America)

    New France, (1534–1763), the French colonies of continental North America, initially embracing the shores of the St. Lawrence River, Newfoundland, and Acadia (Nova Scotia) but gradually expanding to include much of the Great Lakes region and parts of the trans-Appalachian West. The name Gallia Nova

  • Nouvelle-France, Compagnie de la (Canadian company)

    Canada: The Company of New France: The French government supplied more active support after the remarkable revival of royal power carried out in the 1620s by Armand-Jean du Plessis, cardinal et duc de Richelieu. Richelieu sought to make French colonial policy comparable to that of England and…

  • Nouvelle-Orléans (Louisiana, United States)

    New Orleans, city, southeastern Louisiana, U.S. Unquestionably one of the most distinctive cities of the New World, New Orleans was established at great cost in an environment of conflict. Its strategic position, commanding the mouth of the great Mississippi-Missouri river system, which drains the

  • Nouvelles Inventions pour bien bastir et à petits fraiz (work by Delorme)

    Philibert Delorme: …favour and turned to writing Nouvelles Inventions pour bien bastir et à petits fraiz (1561) and Le Premier Tome de l’architecture de Philibert de L’Orme (1567, revised 1568), two architectural treatises expounding the theories behind his practices. These works also attest to the way in which Delorme successfully grafted the…

  • Nouvelles Kermesses (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: …Kermesses (1884; “Country Fair”) and Nouvelles Kermesses (1887; “New Country Fair”), graphically describe the seamy side of peasant life; his city novels explore the world of the working classes and social outcasts. In the novel Escal-Vigor (1899; Escal-Vigor: A Strange Love), Eekhoud confronted his own homosexuality.

  • Nouvelles Littéraires (French periodical)

    history of publishing: Continental Europe: …and intellectual values; and the Nouvelles Littéraires (1922) was founded by André Gillon as a weekly of information, criticism, and bibliography. After World War II there appeared Jean-Paul Sartre’s left-wing monthly Les Temps Modernes (founded 1945), La Table Ronde (1948), and Les Lettres Nouvelles (1953). In Germany, political magazines included…

  • Nouvelles méthodes pour la détermination des orbites des comètes (work by Legendre)

    Adrien-Marie Legendre: Legendre’s Nouvelles méthodes pour la détermination des orbites des comètes (1806; “New Methods for the Determination of Comet Orbits”) contains the first comprehensive treatment of the method of least squares, although priority for its discovery is shared with his German rival Carl Friedrich Gauss.

  • Nouvelles récréations et joyeux devis (work by Des Périers)

    Bonaventure Des Périers: …Mirth and Pleasant Conceits, or Novel Pastimes and Merry Tales), the collection of stories and fables on which his fame rests, appeared at Lyon in 1558. The stories are models of simple, direct narration in the vigorous, witty, and picturesque French of the 16th century.

  • Nov (novel by Turgenev)

    Virgin Soil, novel by Ivan Turgenev, published in Russian as Nov in 1877. Its focus is the young populists who hoped to sow the seeds of revolution in the virgin soil of the Russian peasantry. Turgenev presents realistic and somewhat sympathetic portraits of the many different types of characters

  • nova (surface feature, Venus)

    Venus: Coronae: (Such features are sometimes called novae, a name given to them when their evolutionary relationship to coronae was less certain.) Once a diapir has neared the surface and cooled, it loses its buoyancy. The initially raised crust then can sag under its own weight, developing concentric faults as it does…

  • Nova (American television series)

    Brian Greene: …as several episodes of PBS’s Nova series in 2011. His later works included Icarus at the Edge of Time (2008), a board book for both children and adults, and The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos (2011).

  • Nova (work by Antonio)

    Nicolás Antonio: … appeared in two parts (Nova, 1672; Vetus, 1696). The first is a vast bibliography of Peninsular and Spanish colonial writers after 1500, with critical evaluations. The second, a history of Peninsular literature from the reign of Augustus to 1500, marks the emergence of modern bibliography and the transformation of…

  • nova (astronomy)

    Nova, any of a class of exploding stars whose luminosity temporarily increases from several thousand to as much as 100,000 times its normal level. A nova reaches maximum luminosity within hours after its outburst and may shine intensely for several days or occasionally for a few weeks, after which

  • Nova Arcádia (Portuguese literary society)

    arcádia: In 1790 a Nova Arcádia (“New Arcadia”) came into being, its two most distinguished members being the rival poets Manuel Maria Barbosa du Bocage, who is now remembered for a few outstanding sonnets, and José Agostinho de Macedo, known for his experiments with the epic form. Curvo Semedo…

  • Nova Castella, Jo?o da (Spanish explorer)

    Jo?o da Nova, Spanish navigator who in the service of Portugal discovered the islands of Ascension and St. Helena, both off the southwestern coast of Africa. Commanding a fleet of four ships, Nova left Portugal on a voyage to India in 1501. En route he discovered Ascension Island. In India he

  • Nova Constellatio (American coin)

    coin: Coins of the United States: …issue of the historic 1783 Nova Constellatio silver patterns of 1,000, 500, and 100 units, from dies by the Englishman Benjamin Dudley, exemplifying the extraordinary Morris Plan, drawn up by Robert Morris, superintendent of finance, which reconciled the diverse colonial moneys of account. In 1786, however, Congress adopted instead the…

  • Nova Delphini (astronomy)

    star: Peculiar variables: …from Nova Serpentis 1970 and Nova Delphini. The radio emission from the latter objects is consistent with that expected from an expanding shell of ionized gas that fades away as the gas becomes attenuated. The central star of the Crab Nebula has been detected as a radio (and optical) pulsar.

  • Nová Dubnica (Slovakia)

    Slovakia: Settlement patterns: Partizánske and Nová Dubnica, both in the west, are examples of new towns founded, respectively, just before and after World War II.

  • Nova Friburgo (Brazil)

    Nova Friburgo, city, east-central Rio de Janeiro estado (state), eastern Brazil. It is situated on the Rio Grande in the Serra de Nova Friburgo, 2,776 feet (846 metres) above sea level. Nova Friburgo has textile mills but is best known as a summer mountain resort, built in Swiss Alpine style, and

  • Nova Goa (India)

    Panaji, town, capital of Goa state, western India. It lies on the estuary of the Mandavi River at the river’s mouth on the Arabian Sea. Panaji was a tiny village until the mid-18th century, when repeated plagues forced the Portuguese to abandon their capital of Velha Goa (Old Goa, or Ela). Panaji

  • Nova Herculis (astronomy)

    Nova Herculis, one of the brightest novas of the 20th century, discovered Dec. 13, 1934, by the British amateur astronomer J.P.M. Prentice, in the northern constellation Hercules. It reached an apparent visual magnitude of 1.4 and remained visible to the unaided eye for months. At its centre was

  • Nova Igua?u (Brazil)

    Nova Igua?u, city and suburb of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro estado (state), Brazil. Formerly called Maxambamba, it lies in the Sarapuí River valley at 85 feet (26 metres) above sea level, about 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Rio de Janeiro. The city’s varied industries include

  • Nova Lamego (Guinea-Bissau)

    Gabú, town located in eastern Guinea-Bissau. Gabú is situated along the Colufe River, a tributary of the Gêba River, and is an agricultural marketing centre. Peanuts (groundnuts), mostly grown by the primarily Muslim Fulani (Fulbe) peoples, are the principal crop. The town is connected by road to

  • Nova laser (laser)

    fusion reactor: Inertial confinement: …and most powerful laser, the Nova laser. (The Nova is a 10-beam neodymium-glass laser operated at an energy level of 40,000 joules in a one-nanosecond pulse.) Although the value of this product is comparable to that representing breakeven for magnetic fusion, laser fusion requires a larger value to overcome the…

  • Nova Lima (Brazil)

    Nova Lima, city, east-central Minas Gerais estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It lies along the Cristais River at 2,444 feet (745 metres) above sea level, just southeast of Belo Horizonte, the state capital. Nova Lima was made the seat of a municipality in 1891 and became a city in 1936. It is

  • Nova Lisboa (Angola)

    Huambo, city, west-central Angola. It lies south of the Cuanza River on the Bié Plateau at an elevation of 5,581 feet (1,701 metres) and has a temperate climate. The city was founded in 1912 by Portuguese settlers and workers on the Benguela Railway, which was then under construction. It was first

  • Nova Methodus pro Maximis et Minimis (work by Leibniz)

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: The Hanoverian period: …the latter year he published Nova Methodus pro Maximis et Minimis (“New Method for the Greatest and the Least”), which was an exposition of his differential calculus.

  • Nova Ophiuchi 1604 (supernova)

    Kepler’s Nova, one of the few supernovae (violent stellar explosions) known to have occurred in the Milky Way Galaxy. Jan Brunowski, Johannes Kepler’s assistant, first observed the phenomenon in October 1604; Kepler studied it until early 1606, when the supernova was no longer visible to the

  • Nova Persei (astronomy)

    Nova Persei, bright nova that attained an absolute magnitude of ?9.2. Spectroscopic observations of the nova, which appeared in 1901, provided important information about interstellar gas. The shell thrown off by the exploding star was unusually asymmetrical, and a bright nebulosity near the star

  • Nová rada (work by Fla?ka)

    Czech literature: Origins and development through the 17th century: …well as the political allegory Nová rada (“The New Council”), written by Smil Fla?ka to defend the rights of the Bohemian nobility against the crown.

  • Nova revija (Slovenian journal)

    Slovenia: Media and publishing: …monthly scholarly and literary journal Nova revija (“New Review”) was influential in Slovenia’s political transition. Perhaps its most famous issue was No. 57, released in 1987 with an article titled “Contributions to a Slovenian National Programme,” in which Slovenian intellectuals called for independence and a democratic republic. The Nova Revija…

  • Nova Scientia (work by Tartaglia)

    Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia: Tartaglia’s Nova Scientia (1537; “A New Science”), a treatise on gunnery, is an important pioneering effort to establish the laws of falling bodies. Soon after the publication of this work, Tartaglia was asked by Girolamo Cardano, physician and lecturer in Milan, to publish his solution to…

  • Nova Scotia (province, Canada)

    Nova Scotia, Canadian province located on the eastern seaboard of North America, one of the four original provinces (along with New Brunswick, Ontario, and Quebec) that constituted the Dominion of Canada in 1867. Roughly 360 miles (580 km) long but not more than about 80 miles (130 km) wide at any

  • Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever (breed of dog)

    Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever, breed of sporting dog developed in Canada in the 19th century to lure ducks within gunshot range. The dogs toll (entice) the ducks to approach by their antics onshore and retrieve the downed birds for the hunter. The smallest of the retrievers, the “toller”

  • Nova Scotia Magazine (Canadian magazine)

    Canadian literature: From settlement to 1900: The first literary journal, the Nova-Scotia Magazine, was published in Halifax in 1789. The town’s literary activity was invigorated by an influx of loyalists during the American Revolution and by the energetic Joseph Howe, a journalist, a poet, and the first premier of Nova Scotia. Two of the most potent…

  • Nova Scotia, flag of (Canadian provincial flag)

    Canadian provincial flag consisting of a white field (background) with a blue saltire (diagonal cross) extending to the flag corners; a shield in the centre features a red lion on a golden field.The flag is based on the provincial coat of arms, which was itself inspired by the Scottish Cross of St.

  • Nova Serpentis 1970 (astronomy)

    star: Peculiar variables: …and the shells ejected from Nova Serpentis 1970 and Nova Delphini. The radio emission from the latter objects is consistent with that expected from an expanding shell of ionized gas that fades away as the gas becomes attenuated. The central star of the Crab Nebula has been detected as a…

  • Nova Sofala (Mozambique)

    Sofala, historic seaport situated at the mouth of the Sofala River on the coast of what was Portuguese East Africa, now Mozambique. Once the first town of the Portuguese possessions of eastern Africa, Sofala declined rapidly in importance after 1890, when Beira was established about 20 miles (30

  • Nova Traiana, Via (ancient road, Middle East)

    King’s Highway, ancient thoroughfare that connected Syria and the Gulf of Aqaba by way of what is now Jordan. Mentioned in the Old Testament, it is one of the world’s oldest continuously used communication routes. The King’s Highway was an important thoroughfare for north-south trade from ancient

  • Nova, Jo?o da (Spanish explorer)

    Jo?o da Nova, Spanish navigator who in the service of Portugal discovered the islands of Ascension and St. Helena, both off the southwestern coast of Africa. Commanding a fleet of four ships, Nova left Portugal on a voyage to India in 1501. En route he discovered Ascension Island. In India he

  • Nova, Juan de (Spanish explorer)

    Jo?o da Nova, Spanish navigator who in the service of Portugal discovered the islands of Ascension and St. Helena, both off the southwestern coast of Africa. Commanding a fleet of four ships, Nova left Portugal on a voyage to India in 1501. En route he discovered Ascension Island. In India he

  • novaculite (rock)

    Novaculite, very dense, light-coloured, even-textured sedimentary rock, a bedded chert in which microcrystalline silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2) in the form of quartz predominates over silica in the form of chalcedony. Deposits of novaculite exhibit stratification. The name is applied chiefly to

  • Nova?s, Guiomar (Brazilian musician)

    Guiomar Nova?s, Brazilian pianist known especially for her interpretations of works by Frédéric Chopin and Robert Schumann. After early studies in S?o Paulo with Luigi Chiafarelli, Nova?s was sent by the Brazilian government to the Paris Conservatory, where she took first place in the entrance

  • Novaia Zemlia (islands, Russia)

    Novaya Zemlya, archipelago in northwestern Russia, lying in the Arctic Ocean and separating the Barents and Kara seas. Novaya Zemlya (“New Land”) consists of two large islands, Severny (northern) and Yuzhny (southern), aligned for 600 miles (1,000 km) in a southwest-northeast direction, plus

  • Novak, David (scholar)

    Judaism: Modern views of the people Israel: …Body of Faith (1983) and David Novak’s The Election of Israel (1995). Wyschogrod held that the people of Israel were elected because of God’s exceptional love for them and that God’s love existed prior to the revelation to Moses on Mount Sinai. Novak also accepted the traditional belief that God…

  • Novak, Joseph (American writer)

    Jerzy Kosinski, Polish-born American writer whose novels were sociological studies of individuals in controlling and bureaucratic societies. At the age of six, upon the outbreak of World War II, Kosinski, a Jew, was separated from his parents and wandered through Poland and Russia, living by his

  • Novak, Kim (American actress)

    Kim Novak, American actor who was a popular star in the mid- to late 1950s, best known for her dual performance as Madeleine Elster and Judy Barton in Alfred Hitchcock’s psychological thriller Vertigo (1958). The two women portrayed by Novak are part of a plot to trick an acrophobic former

  • Novak, Michael (American theologian, economist, historian, and author)

    Michael Novak, American lay theologian, economist, historian, and author who became a prominent neoconservative political theorist. Novak earned a B.A. from Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, in 1956 and a B.A. in theology from Gregorian University in Rome in 1958. He began graduate

  • Novak, Robert (American political journalist and commentator)

    Robert Novak, (Robert David Sanders Novak), American political journalist and commentator (born Feb. 26, 1931, Joliet, Ill.—died Aug. 18, 2009, Washington, D.C.), wrote the influential syndicated newspaper column “Inside Report” for more than 40 years and from 1980 pugnaciously espoused a

  • Novak, Robert David Sanders (American political journalist and commentator)

    Robert Novak, (Robert David Sanders Novak), American political journalist and commentator (born Feb. 26, 1931, Joliet, Ill.—died Aug. 18, 2009, Washington, D.C.), wrote the influential syndicated newspaper column “Inside Report” for more than 40 years and from 1980 pugnaciously espoused a

  • Novák, Vítězslav (Czech composer)

    Vítězslav Novák, Czech composer who was one of the principal proponents of nationalism in Czech music and the teacher of many Czech composers of the 20th century. Novák studied under Antonín Dvo?ák at the Prague Conservatory and in 1909 began teaching there. His early works were influenced by

  • Novakhovitsh, Ben-Zion (American author)

    Yiddish literature: Writers in New York: Morris Winchevsky (pseudonym of Ben-Zion Novakhovitsh) was born in Lithuania, moved to K?nigsberg, Germany [now Kaliningrad, Russia], in 1877, and began to publish poems, stories, and articles in socialist Hebrew newspapers in the late 1870s. He was arrested and expelled from Prussia. In London he…

  • Novalis (German poet)

    Novalis, early German Romantic poet and theorist who greatly influenced later Romantic thought. Novalis was born into a family of Protestant Lower Saxon nobility and took his pseudonym from “de Novali,” a name his family had formerly used. He studied law at the University of Jena (1790), where he

  • Novanglus (president of United States)

    John Adams, an early advocate of American independence from Great Britain, a major figure in the Continental Congress (1774–77), the author of the Massachusetts constitution (1780), a signer of the Treaty of Paris (1783), the first American ambassador to the Court of St. James (1785–88), and the

  • Novara (Italy)

    Novara, city, Piemonte (Piedmont) regione, northwestern Italy. It lies along the Agogna River, west of Milan. It originated as the Roman colony of Novaria, which was founded by Julius Caesar and destroyed in the 5th century; a new commune, established in the 6th century, was burned by the Holy

  • Novara, Battle of (Italy [1849])

    Battle of Novara, (March 23, 1849), battle of the first Italian War of Independence in which 70,000 Austrian troops under Field Marshal Joseph Radetzky thoroughly defeated 100,000 poorly trained Italian troops (not all of whom were actually employed in the battle) under Charles Albert, king of

  • Novara, Battle of (Italy [1821])

    Congress of Laibach: …down by the Austrians at Novara on April 8, 1821.

  • Novara, Domenico Maria de (Italian astronomer)

    Nicolaus Copernicus: Early life and education: …principal astronomer at the university, Domenico Maria de Novara (Latin: Domenicus Maria Novaria Ferrariensis; 1454–1504). Novara had the responsibility of issuing annual astrological prognostications for the city, forecasts that included all social groups but gave special attention to the fate of the Italian princes and their enemies. Copernicus, as is…

  • Novaria (Italy)

    Novara, city, Piemonte (Piedmont) regione, northwestern Italy. It lies along the Agogna River, west of Milan. It originated as the Roman colony of Novaria, which was founded by Julius Caesar and destroyed in the 5th century; a new commune, established in the 6th century, was burned by the Holy

  • Novarro, Ramon (American actor)

    Sam Wood: Early work: … (1932), a football drama starring Ramon Novarro; Prosperity (1932), the ninth and last teaming of popular comedians Dressler and Polly Moran; and Hold Your Man (1933), a calculated showcase for the charismatic pair of Clark Gable and Jean Harlow. Wood’s other credits from 1933 were The Barbarian, a romantic drama…

  • Novartis AG (Swiss company)

    Novartis AG, Swiss company that is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of pharmaceuticals. It was formed in 1997 from the merger of two major Swiss drug companies, Ciba-Geigy AG and Sandoz AG. Novartis is headquartered in Basel. Ciba-Geigy originated in the merger of two smaller Swiss firms,

  • Novarupta (volcano, Alaska, United States)

    Novarupta, volcanic vent and lava dome, southern Alaska, U.S., located at an elevation of 841 metres (2,759 feet) within Katmai National Park and Preserve. Its violent eruption, which began on June 6, 1912, and lasted 60 hours, is considered the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century.

  • Novatian (antipope)

    Novatian, the second antipope in papal history, in 251. He was the first Roman theologian to write in Latin and inspired the Novatian Schism—a break from the Christian church by rigorists who condemned apostasy. (His name was certainly Novatianus, not Novatus, as given by the Greeks.) Novatian w

  • Novatian Schism (religion)

    Saint Lucius I: …Lucius opposed and condemned the Novatian Schism, a rigorist movement against penitent apostates, inspired by the antipope Novatian. Lucius is honoured in Denmark as the patron saint of Copenhagen. Lucius’ martyrdom in the Valerian persecution is unproven.

  • Novatianus (antipope)

    Novatian, the second antipope in papal history, in 251. He was the first Roman theologian to write in Latin and inspired the Novatian Schism—a break from the Christian church by rigorists who condemned apostasy. (His name was certainly Novatianus, not Novatus, as given by the Greeks.) Novatian w

  • Novato (California, United States)

    Novato, city, Marin county, western California, U.S. Located about 30 miles (50 km) north of San Francisco, it lies along Novato Creek, between San Pablo Bay (east) and Point Reyes National Seashore (west). The area was once the territory of Miwok Indians. Ownership of the land was granted to

  • Novatus, Lucius Annaeus (Roman official)

    Junius Gallio, Roman official who dismissed the charges brought by the Jews against the apostle Paul (Acts 18:12–17). The elder brother of the philosopher and tragedian Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Novatus assumed the name Gallio after his adoption by the senator Junius Gallio. Upon the accession of the

  • Novaya Gazeta (Russian newspaper)

    Mikhail Gorbachev: Later life: …half of the independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta, known for its willingness to challenge Kremlin policies. On September 30, 2008, it was announced that Gorbachev and Lebedev were forming a new political party, though it never materialized. Although Gorbachev was at times critical of Russian leader Vladimir Putin, he supported the…

  • Novaya Sankt-Petersburgskaya gazeta (Russian newspaper)

    Mikhail Mikhaylovich, Count Speransky: Secretary to the Emperor.: …the prime mover in founding Severnaya pochta or Novaya Sankt-Petersburgskaya gazeta, Russia’s first official newspaper. In 1807 he became intimately associated with the Emperor himself, as his administrative secretary and assistant. In 1808 he accompanied Alexander to his meeting with Napoleon, who described him as “the only clear head in…

  • Novaya Zemlya (islands, Russia)

    Novaya Zemlya, archipelago in northwestern Russia, lying in the Arctic Ocean and separating the Barents and Kara seas. Novaya Zemlya (“New Land”) consists of two large islands, Severny (northern) and Yuzhny (southern), aligned for 600 miles (1,000 km) in a southwest-northeast direction, plus

  • Novaya Zemlya Trough (submarine region, Russia)

    Kara Sea: …of Novaya Zemlya stretches the Novaya Zemlya Trough, 650–1,300 feet (200–400 m) deep.

  • nové město (Bohemian administrative district)

    Czechoslovak history: The Luxembourg dynasty: …by attaching a new borough, Nové město (New Town), which increased the population to about 30,000. In 1348 he founded in Prague the first university in the empire. It consisted of four traditional faculties (theology, law, medicine, and liberal arts), and its members were grouped into four nations (Bohemian, Bavarian,…

  • Nove ware (pottery)

    Nove ware, primarily majolica, or tin-glazed earthenware, made in Nove, Italy, in the 18th century. The factory was founded by Giovanni Battista Antonibon in 1728, and in the latter part of the century it had connections with a factory in nearby Bassano, where majolica had been made two centuries

  • Nove, Novena (work by Lins)

    Osman Lins: …works that secured his reputation: Nove, Novena (1966; Nine, Novena), consisting of nine narratives; Avalovara (1973; Eng. trans. Avalovara), a novel; and A rainha dos cárceres da Grécia (1976; The Queen of the Prisons of Greece). These works subject fictional narrative to an order determined by external elements of “literary…

  • novecentistas (Spanish literature)

    Spanish literature: Novecentismo: The term novecentistas applies to a generation of writers that fall between the Generation of 1898 and the vanguardist Generation of 1927. The novecentistas—sometimes also called the Generation of 1914—were more classical and less revolutionary than their predecessors. They sought to renew intellectual and…

  • Novecento movement (Italian art)

    Novecento movement, group of Italian artists, formed in 1922 in Milan, that advocated a return to the great Italian representational art of the past. The founding members of the Novecento (Italian: 20th-century) movement were the critic Margherita Sarfatti and seven artists: Anselmo Bucci, Leonardo

  • novel (literature)

    Novel, an invented prose narrative of considerable length and a certain complexity that deals imaginatively with human experience, usually through a connected sequence of events involving a group of persons in a specific setting. Within its broad framework, the genre of the novel has encompassed an

  • Novel 17 (Roman decree)

    Valentinian III: …the Great, issued the famous Novel 17, which assigned to the bishop of Rome supremacy over the provincial churches. During the closing years of Valentinian’s reign, the Huns invaded Gaul (451) and northern Italy (452), but it is not known whether Valentinian personally played any significant part in meeting these…

  • novel disseisin (law)

    adverse possession: …known as the assize of novel disseisin. If the land held by a disseisor was claimed by an heir of the original owner in seisin, the heir could bring a similar legal action known as the assize of mort d’ancestor. After the 17th century more expeditious legal actions were developed.

  • novel disseizin (law)

    adverse possession: …known as the assize of novel disseisin. If the land held by a disseisor was claimed by an heir of the original owner in seisin, the heir could bring a similar legal action known as the assize of mort d’ancestor. After the 17th century more expeditious legal actions were developed.

  • novel of manners (literature)

    Novel of manners, work of fiction that re-creates a social world, conveying with finely detailed observation the customs, values, and mores of a highly developed and complex society. The conventions of the society dominate the story, and characters are differentiated by the degree to which they

  • novel of sensibility (literature)

    Sentimental novel, broadly, any novel that exploits the reader’s capacity for tenderness, compassion, or sympathy to a disproportionate degree by presenting a beclouded or unrealistic view of its subject. In a restricted sense the term refers to a widespread European novelistic development of the 1

  • Novel Pastimes and Merry Tales (work by Des Périers)

    Bonaventure Des Périers: …Mirth and Pleasant Conceits, or Novel Pastimes and Merry Tales), the collection of stories and fables on which his fame rests, appeared at Lyon in 1558. The stories are models of simple, direct narration in the vigorous, witty, and picturesque French of the 16th century.

  • novel poet (poetry movement)

    neōteros: …later a group called the novel poets modeled themselves after the neōteroi, writing in Greek and following Greek models.

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