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  • waveguide dispersion (communications)

    telecommunications media: Optical fibres: …fibres are material dispersion and waveguide dispersion. Material dispersion is a phenomenon in which different optical wavelengths propagate at different velocities, depending on the refractive index of the material used in the fibre core. Waveguide dispersion depends not on the material of the fibre core but on its diameter; it…

  • wavelength (physics)

    Wavelength, distance between corresponding points of two consecutive waves. “Corresponding points” refers to two points or particles in the same phase—i.e., points that have completed identical fractions of their periodic motion. Usually, in transverse waves (waves with points oscillating at right

  • wavelength shifter (physics)

    radiation measurement: Organic scintillators: …scintillators to act as a wave shifter, which absorbs the primary light from the organic fluor and re-radiates the energy at a longer wavelength more suitable for matching the response of photomultiplier tubes or photodiodes. Plastic scintillators are commercially available in sheets or cylinders with dimensions of several centimetres or…

  • Wavell of Eritrea and of Winchester, Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl (British field marshal)

    Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell, British field marshal and government administrator whose victories against the Italians in North Africa during the early part of World War II were offset by his inability to defeat the German Afrika Korps under General Erwin Rommel (1941) and his failure

  • Wavell of Eritrea and of Winchester, Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl, Viscount Wavell of Cyrenaica And Of Winchester, Viscount Keren Of Eritrea And Of Winchester (British field marshal)

    Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell, British field marshal and government administrator whose victories against the Italians in North Africa during the early part of World War II were offset by his inability to defeat the German Afrika Korps under General Erwin Rommel (1941) and his failure

  • Wavell, Archibald Percival, 1st Earl Wavell (British field marshal)

    Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell, British field marshal and government administrator whose victories against the Italians in North Africa during the early part of World War II were offset by his inability to defeat the German Afrika Korps under General Erwin Rommel (1941) and his failure

  • wavellite (mineral)

    Wavellite, hydrated aluminum phosphate [Al3(PO4)2(OH)3·5H2O], a common phosphate mineral that typically occurs as translucent, greenish, globular masses in crevices in aluminous metamorphic rocks, in limonite and phosphate-rock deposits, and in hydrothermal veins. Occurrences include Zbiroh, Czech

  • wavemeter (measurement device)

    Wavemeter, device for determining the distance between successive wavefronts of equal phase along an electromagnetic wave. The determination is often made indirectly, by measuring the frequency of the wave. Although electromagnetic wavelengths depend on the propagation media, wavemeters are

  • Waveney (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Waveney, district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, England. It is bounded to the east by the North Sea and to the northwest by the River Waveney. The interior is rich farmland. Along the river are the small industrial communities of Beccles and Bungay, and near its mouth is

  • Waveney, River (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Waveney, stream in England whose whole course of 50 miles (80 km) marks the boundary between the East Anglian counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The river flows northeastward through agricultural countryside, and no major towns are located on its banks. Its lower reaches form part of The

  • Waverley (novel by Scott)

    Sir Walter Scott: …his novel, which he titled Waverley. It was one of the rare and happy cases in literary history when something original and powerful was immediately recognized and enjoyed by a large public. A story of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, it reinterpreted and presented with living force the manners and…

  • Waverley (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Waverley, borough (district), administrative and historic county of Surrey, southeastern England. It occupies the southwestern corner of the county, along the Hampshire and Sussex borders. Godalming is the administrative centre. Waverley’s wooded hills and heathlands have been designated an Area of

  • Waverley Novels, The (novels by Scott)

    The Waverley Novels, a series of more than two dozen historical novels published by Sir Walter Scott between 1814 and 1832. Although the novels were extremely popular and strongly promoted at the time, he did not publicly reveal his authorship of them until 1827. Notable works in the series include

  • WAVES (United States naval organization)

    WAVES, military unit, established on July 30, 1942, as the U.S. Navy’s corps of female members. During World War II some 100,000 WAVES served in a wide variety of capacities, ranging from performing essential clerical duties to serving as instructors for male pilots-in-training. Initially, they did

  • Waves of Sea and Love, The (work by Grillparzer)

    Franz Grillparzer: …und der Liebe Wellen (1831; The Waves of Sea and Love), often judged to be Grillparzer’s greatest tragedy because of the degree of harmony achieved between content and form, marks a return to the classical theme in treating the story of Hero and Leander, which is, however, interpreted with a…

  • waves, modulation of (physics)

    interference: …of the addition of the amplitudes of the individual waves at each point affected by more than one wave.

  • Waves, The (novel by Woolf)

    The Waves, experimental novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1931. The Waves was one of her most inventive and complex books. It reflects Woolf’s greater concern with capturing the poetic rhythm of life than with maintaining a traditional focus on character and plot. Composed of dramatic (and

  • wavey (bird)

    Snow goose, (Chen caerulescens), a species of North American goose that may be either white or dark with black wingtips and pink legs and a bill with black gape (“grin”), belonging to the family Anatidae (order Anseriformes). Two subspecies are recognized. The lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens

  • Wavin’ Flag (song by K’naan)

    K'Naan: …the determinedly optimistic track “Wavin’ Flag,” already a hit in Canada, was remade as a celebrity-studded charity single to benefit victims of the January earthquake in Haiti. Another version of the song, a remix by K’Naan, became the official anthem of Coca-Cola’s 2010 World Cup campaign. Amid such popularity,…

  • wavy (bird)

    Snow goose, (Chen caerulescens), a species of North American goose that may be either white or dark with black wingtips and pink legs and a bill with black gape (“grin”), belonging to the family Anatidae (order Anseriformes). Two subspecies are recognized. The lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens

  • Waw (South Sudan)

    Wau, town, northwestern South Sudan. It lies on the western bank of the Jur River (a tributary of Al-Ghazāl River), about 140 miles (220 km) northwest of Rumbek. The town was the scene of antigovernment disturbances in 1965, in which a number of people were killed and much of Wau was destroyed as a

  • Wawa Belt (geological region, Canada)

    Precambrian: Age and occurrence of greenstone-granite belts: …province of Canada; the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon, and Quetico belts of the Superior province of Canada; the Dharwar belts in India; and the Warrawoona and Yilgarn belts in Australia.

  • Wawat (region and ancient settlement, Nubia)

    Nubia: …of Aswān; this was called Wawat.

  • Wawel Castle (castle, Kraków, Poland)

    Western architecture: Eastern Europe: The rebuilding of his Wawel Castle (1507–36) in Kraków was begun by the Italian Francesco della Lore and continued by Bartolommeo Berecci of Florence. It presents a blend of local Gothic and 15th-century Italian architecture. The great courtyard has three stories of loggias; the two lower ones, with semicircular…

  • Wawel Cathedral (cathedral, Kraków, Poland)

    Kraków: The contemporary city: Wawel Cathedral houses several ornate chapels and burial chambers, along with a collection of ecclesiastical art. Originally constructed in the early 11th century, the cathedral was rebuilt in 1142 and 1364, and it was renovated in 1712 in its current Gothic style. Two defensive fortifications…

  • Wawrinka, Stan (Swiss tennis player)

    Novak Djokovic: …a four-set match to Switzerland’s Stan Wawrinka. He failed to advance past the quarterfinals in the first three Grand Slam tournaments of 2017, and in July he announced that he would not play the remainder of the year in order to treat an elbow injury that had been bothering him…

  • Wawrinka, Stanislas (Swiss tennis player)

    Novak Djokovic: …a four-set match to Switzerland’s Stan Wawrinka. He failed to advance past the quarterfinals in the first three Grand Slam tournaments of 2017, and in July he announced that he would not play the remainder of the year in order to treat an elbow injury that had been bothering him…

  • wax (substance)

    Wax, any of a class of pliable substances of animal, plant, mineral, or synthetic origin that differ from fats in being less greasy, harder, and more brittle and in containing principally compounds of high molecular weight (e.g., fatty acids, alcohols, and saturated hydrocarbons). Waxes share

  • wax begonia (plant)

    waxplant: Unrelated plants: The wax begonia (see begonia) is a waxy-leaved bedding and pot plant. The wax-leaved privet, or white wax tree, is a landscape plant used in warm climates. The wax tree (Toxicodendron succedaneum) is a Japanese tree grown for its waxy berries and stem juices that yield…

  • wax crayon (art)

    crayon: …two types of crayons, the colouring crayon and the chalk crayon.

  • wax dipping (industrial technology)

    poultry processing: Defeathering: An extra process, called wax dipping, is often used for waterfowl, since their feathers are more difficult to remove. Following the mechanical feather picking, the carcasses are dipped in a melted, dark-coloured wax. The wax is allowed to harden and then is peeled away, pulling out the feathers at…

  • wax gourd (plant)

    Wax gourd, (Benincasa hispida), fleshy vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), grown for its edible fruits. The wax gourd is native to tropical Asia, where it is commonly used in soups, curries, and stir-fries and is sometimes made into a beverage. Like other gourds, the fruit has a long shelf

  • wax mallow (plant)

    mallow: …but naturalized along coastal California; wax mallow (Malvaviscus arboreus), a reddish flowering ornamental shrub from South America; poppy mallow (Callirhoe involucrata), a hairy perennial, low-growing, with poppy-like reddish flowers; and Indian mallow, also called velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti), a weedy plant. Chaparral mallows (Malacothamnus species), a group of shrubs and small…

  • Wax Museum, The (American radio program)

    Studs Terkel: In 1945 Terkel inaugurated The Wax Museum, a radio program that brought out his knack for engaging people in impromptu interviews. Studs’s Place, Terkel’s nationally broadcast television show, ran from 1949 to 1952. The program comprised songs and stories and used a fictional bar as its backdrop. Its cancellation…

  • wax myrtle (plant)

    Myricaceae: …leaves useful in medicines; the wax myrtle, or candleberry (M. cerifera), a tall shrub or small tree growing to about 11 metres (35 feet); and bayberry (M. pennsylvanica), which yields a wax used in candles. The sweet fern (Comptonia peregrina) is a small aromatic shrub of eastern North America, the…

  • wax myrtle family (plant family)

    Myricaceae, the wax myrtle family of dicotyledonous flowering plants, in the beech order (Fagales), found throughout the world, with three genera of trees and shrubs having aromatic leaves. Many of the species bear yellow glandular dots on the surface, from which the characteristic odour of these

  • wax plant (plant)

    Waxplant, (genus Hoya), genus of more than 200 species of perennial plants in the dogbane family (Apocynaceae). Members of the genus are found throughout tropical Asia and parts of Australia. Several are popular as greenhouse plants or window plants. Waxplants are perennial evergreen vines or

  • wax plant (plant genus)

    houseplant: Climbers and trailers: Intriguing is the slow-growing Hoya, or wax plant, with leathery foliage and waxy, wheel-shaped blooms. By contrast, the inch plants and wandering jew, species of Tradescantia and Zebrina, are rapid growers with watery stems and varicoloured leaves; these long-beloved houseplants are used widely in window shelves or hanging baskets.…

  • wax sculpture (sculpture)

    Wax sculpture, the preparation of finished figures in beeswax by modelling or molding or the use of such figures as a form for casting metal or creating preliminary models. At ordinary temperatures beeswax can be cut and shaped with facility; it melts to a limpid fluid at a low heat; it mixes with

  • wax tablet (writing technology)

    paleography: Types of writing materials: …replaced for everyday use by wax tablets corresponding to today’s notebook. Tablets made of wooden blocks were hollowed out and filled with melted, often black wax. Notes were made in the hardened surface. Even documents of permanent significance, such as property conveyances, were made on wax tablets.

  • wax tree (plant)

    waxplant: Unrelated plants: The wax-leaved privet, or white wax tree, is a landscape plant used in warm climates. The wax tree (Toxicodendron succedaneum) is a Japanese tree grown for its waxy berries and stem juices that yield a natural lacquer. The wax vine, or cape ivy (Senecio macroglossus), which has thick waxy succulent…

  • wax turnip (plant)

    Rutabaga, (Brassica napus, variety napobrassica), root vegetable in the mustard family (Brassicaceae), cultivated for its fleshy roots and edible leaves. Rutabagas likely originated as a cross between turnips (Brassica rapa, variety rapa) and wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and are thought to have

  • wax vine (plant)

    waxplant: Major species: …and are sometimes known as wax vines. Porcelain flower (Hoya carnosa) has several cultivated varieties with white to rosy-pink flowers; one such variety, the Hindu rope vine, has twisted distorted leaves that may be variegated cream, yellow, and pink. The miniature waxplant (H. lanceolata bella) is more compact and has…

  • wax-leaved privet (plant)

    privet: Glossy privet (L. lucidum), from eastern Asia, is a 9-metre tree in areas with mild winters. It has 25-centimetre (10-inch) flower clusters in summer. Japanese privet (L. japonicum), about 4.7 m tall, has very glossy leaves. It also requires mild winters, as does the smaller…

  • wax-rosette (plant)

    waxplant: Unrelated plants: A succulent, the wax-rosette (Echeveria× gilva), is noted for its cluster of waxy leaves.

  • waxbill (bird)

    Waxbill, any of several Old World tropical birds named for the prominent red (the colour of sealing wax) of their conical bills. The name is used generally for birds of the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes); less broadly for those of the tribe Estrildini of that family; and particularly for

  • waxbill family (bird family)

    Estrildidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of approximately 140 species of waxbills and other small finchlike birds of the Old World, many of which are favourite cage birds. Members range in size from 7.5 to 15 cm (3 to 6 inches) long. They have short, stout bills and short legs

  • waxflower (plant)

    Stephanotis: …member of the genus, the Madagascar jasmine (Marsdenia floribunda), waxflower, or floradora, is a popular greenhouse plant. This woody, twining vine is native to Madagascar. It has leathery, oval leaves that grow up to 10 cm (4 inches) long and clusters of waxy, white flowers that grow to 5 cm…

  • Waxman, Albert Samuel (Canadian actor)

    Albert Samuel Waxman, (“Al”), Canadian actor (born March 2, 1935, Toronto, Ont.—died Jan. 17, 2001, Toronto), achieved fame with his roles on the television series The King of Kensington and Cagney & Lacey. Waxman studied acting at the Playhouse Theatre in New York City and appeared in a number o

  • Waxman, Franz (German-American composer and musician)

    Bride of Frankenstein: Production notes and credits:

  • Waxman, Meyer (American Judaic scholar)

    Meyer Waxman, Jewish literary historian, rabbi, educator, and scholar. Trained in ?asidic seminaries in Mir and Slutzk, Waxman continued his studies, after emigrating to the United States in 1905, at New York University, Columbia University, and at the Jewish Theological Seminary, where he was

  • waxplant (plant)

    Waxplant, (genus Hoya), genus of more than 200 species of perennial plants in the dogbane family (Apocynaceae). Members of the genus are found throughout tropical Asia and parts of Australia. Several are popular as greenhouse plants or window plants. Waxplants are perennial evergreen vines or

  • waxwing (bird)

    Waxwing, any of three species of birds belonging to the songbird family Bombycillidae (order Passeriformes). They are elegant-looking birds named for beads of shiny red material on the tips of the secondary wing feathers. All species are gray-brown, with tapering crest. The common, or Bohemian,

  • Way Back, The (film by O’Connor [2020])

    Ben Affleck: Roles of the 2010s: …novel by Joan Didion, and The Way Back, about an alcoholic who becomes a high-school basketball coach.

  • Way Back, The (film by Weir [2010])

    Ed Harris: …Show director Peter Weir in The Way Back, about a group of men who escape from a Siberian Gulag camp during World War II. He then appeared in the drama Virginia (2010), in the thriller Man on a Ledge (2012), and as Sen. John McCain in the HBO movie Game…

  • Way Down East (film by Griffith [1920])

    D.W. Griffith: The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance: …and an extremely profitable film, Way Down East (1920), his studio foundered on the failure of lesser films and the business recession of the first half of the 1920s.

  • Way Forward Is with a Broken Heart, The (work by Walker)

    Alice Walker: …the volume of short stories The Way Forward Is with a Broken Heart (2000) and several other volumes of poetry, including Absolute Trust in the Goodness of the Earth (2003), A Poem Traveled Down My Arm (2003), Hard Times Require Furious Dancing (2010), and Taking the Arrow Out of the…

  • Way I Am, The (album by Eminem)

    Eminem: …later Eminem published the memoir The Way I Am, which included photos, drawings, and lyrics.

  • Way I Found Her, The (novel by Tremain)

    Rose Tremain: Tremain’s subsequent novels included The Way I Found Her (1997); Music &amp; Silence (1999), which won a Whitbread Book Award; The Colour (2003); The Road Home (2007), about an eastern European immigrant in London; and The Gustav Sonata (2016). She also wrote the short-story collections

  • Way in the World, A (novel by Naipaul)

    V.S. Naipaul: A Way in the World (1994) is an essaylike novel examining how history forms individuals’ characters. Naipaul’s other novels include The Mimic Men (1967) and The Enigma of Arrival (1987).

  • Way International, The (Christian evangelical group)

    The Way International, Christian evangelical group founded in 1942 as Vesper Chimes, a radio ministry broadcast from Lima, Ohio, by Victor Paul Wierwille (1916–85). Its current headquarters are in New Knoxville, Ohio; estimates of its membership range from 3,000 to 20,000. As a minister in the

  • Way of a Man (work by Sillanpaa)

    Frans Eemil Sillanp??: …blended in Miehen tie (1932; Way of a Man), which describes a young farmer’s growth to maturity. Ihmiset suviy?ss? (1934; People in the Summer Night) is stylistically his most finished and poetic novel. His reminiscences, Poika eli el?m??nsa (1953; “Telling and Describing”) and P?iv? korkeimmillaan (1956; “The High Moment of…

  • Way of All Flesh, The (film by Fleming [1927])

    Victor Fleming: Early work: …prestigious silents he helmed were The Way of All Flesh (1927) with Emil Jannings, Hula (1927) with Clara Bow, and Abie’s Irish Rose (1928), an adaptation of the long-running Broadway show. In 1929 Fleming directed Gary Cooper in two westerns, The Wolf Song and The Virginian, an adaptation of

  • Way of All Flesh, The (novel by Butler)

    The Way of All Flesh, autobiographical novel by Samuel Butler, published posthumously in 1903 though written almost two decades earlier. Beginning with the life of John Pontifex, a carpenter, the novel traces four generations of the Pontifex family, each of which perpetuates the frustration and

  • way of ideas (philosophy)

    Cartesianism: The way of ideas and the self: The first, called “the way of ideas,” represents the attempt in epistemology to provide a foundation for our knowledge of the external world (as well as our knowledge of the past and of other minds) in the mental experiences of the individual. The Cartesian theory of knowledge through…

  • Way of Opinion (philosophical concept)

    Eleaticism: The rigorous ontologism of Parmenides and Melissus: …the “Way of Opinion” (or Seeming), in which the empirical world—i.e., the single things as they appear every day to every human—is presented.

  • Way of Sacrifice (work by von Unruh)

    Fritz von Unruh: …1916 at Verdun, published 1919; Way of Sacrifice) and, on a mythical level, in the tragedy Ein Geschlecht (1916; “A Family”)—strengthened his antimilitaristic attitude and led to such later works as Heinrich von Andernach (1925), a festival play and a great plea for love among men.

  • Way of Seeing, A: Photographs of New York (photography exhibit by Levitt)

    Helen Levitt: …Levitt’s book of photographs entitled A Way of Seeing: Photographs of New York, which she compiled in the late 1940s. (The book was not published until 1965, 10 years after Agee’s death.) In it, he praised Levitt’s photographs, finding them “as beautiful, perceptive, satisfying and enduring as any lyrical work…

  • Way of Seeming (philosophical concept)

    Eleaticism: The rigorous ontologism of Parmenides and Melissus: …the “Way of Opinion” (or Seeming), in which the empirical world—i.e., the single things as they appear every day to every human—is presented.

  • Way of the Heart (religious movement)

    Adidam, a small religious movement grounded in the Hindu tradition. Founded in 1972 in California by Franklin Jones (born 1939), who changed his name to Adi Da (Sanskrit: “One Who Gives from the Divine Source”) in 1994, it has undergone a number of name changes and considerable internal turmoil.

  • Way of the Light, the (religion)

    Stations of the Cross: …been recently supplemented with the Via Lucis (the Way of Light), in which the meditations focus on the resurrected Christ.

  • Way of the Pilgrim, The (religious work)

    Christianity: Eastern Christianity: …the anonymous 19th-century Russian text The Way of the Pilgrim, but noted Russian mystics, such as Seraphim of Sarov (1759–1833) and John of Kronshtadt (1829–1909), also became known in the West during the 20th century. Among mystic sects native to Russia, the Dukhobors, who originated in the 18th century among…

  • Way of the Warrior (Japanese history)

    Bushidō, (Japanese: “Way of the Warrior”) the code of conduct of the samurai, or bushi (warrior), class of premodern Japan. In the mid-19th century, however, the precepts of Bushidō were made the basis of ethical training for the whole society, with the emperor replacing the feudal lord, or daimyo,

  • Way of the World, The (play by Congreve)

    The Way of the World, comedy of manners in five acts by William Congreve, performed and published in 1700. The play, which is considered Congreve’s masterpiece, ridicules the assumptions that governed the society of his time, especially those concerning love and marriage. The plot concerns the

  • Way of Truth (poem by Parmenides)

    Eleaticism: The rigorous ontologism of Parmenides and Melissus: …true conviction”; (2) the “Way of Truth,” the main part, in which the real and unique Being is depicted; and (3) the “Way of Opinion” (or Seeming), in which the empirical world—i.e., the single things as they appear every day to every human—is presented.

  • Way the Future Blogs, The (blog by Pohl)

    Frederik Pohl: …fan writer for his blog The Way the Future Blogs (2010).

  • Way the World Is, The (work by Polkinghorne)

    John Polkinghorne: In 1983 Polkinghorne published The Way the World Is, in which he explained how a thinking person can be a Christian. It was the first of several works on the relationship between science and religion. The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections of a Bottom-Up Thinker appeared in 1994 and…

  • Way to Calvary, The (work by Bruegel)

    Christology: The Middle Ages through the 19th century: …even more so his complex The Way to Calvary (1564), are illustrative of the late medieval and early modern tendency to depict scenes from the life of Jesus in a contemporary idiom. In the latter painting, the centre of the scene, traditionally occupied by Jesus and the cross, contains a…

  • Way to Christ, The (tract by B?hme)

    Jakob B?hme: Writings.: …Der Weg zu Christo (The Way to Christ), a small work joining nature mysticism with devotional fervour. Publication of this tract brought about the intense displeasure of Richter, who incited the populace against B?hme.

  • Way to Wealth, The (work by Franklin)

    Benjamin Franklin: Public service (1753–85): …and later known as the The Way to Wealth. In this preface Father Abraham cites only those proverbs that concern hard work, thrift, and financial prudence. The Way to Wealth eventually became the most widely reprinted of all Franklin’s works, including the Autobiography.

  • Way to Wealth, The (work by Crowley)

    Robert Crowley: His writings include The Way to Wealth (1550), in which he attributed the government’s failure to stop enclosure of common land to the organized resistance of the rich. Other works include An informacion and Peticion agaynst the oppressours of the pore Commons of this Realme (1548), remarkable for…

  • Way Towards the Blessed Life, The (work by Fichte)

    Johann Gottlieb Fichte: Years in Berlin: …oder auch die Religionslehre (1806; The Way Towards the Blessed Life). In this last-named work the union between the finite self-consciousness and the infinite ego, or God, is handled in a deeply religious fashion reminiscent of the Gospel According to John. The knowledge and love of God is declared to…

  • Way We Live Now, The (novel by Trollope)

    The Way We Live Now, novel by Anthony Trollope, published serially in 1874–75 and in book form in 1875. This satire of Victorian society was one of Trollope’s later and more highly regarded works. The novel chronicles the fleeting fame of Augustus Melmotte, a villainous financier of obscure origins

  • Way We Were, The (film by Pollack [1973])

    Sydney Pollack: Film directing: Pollack next directed Redford in The Way We Were (1973), an enormously popular and unremittingly nostalgic love story. It costarred Barbra Streisand as a liberal activist who becomes the conscience of an apolitical writer (Redford), and Streisand received an Oscar nomination for best actress; the title song, which she sang,…

  • Way We Were, The (song by Hamlisch, Bergman, and Bergman)
  • Way You Look Tonight, The (song by Kern and Fields)
  • Way, Gerard (American singer)

    Dark Horse Comics: Gerard Way, cofounder and lead singer of the band My Chemical Romance, penned the award-winning superhero comics series The Umbrella Academy, which he created with artist Gabriel Ba. Chris Onstad’s acclaimed Web comic Achewood was collected in print format in a series of hardcovers, and…

  • Way, Inc., The (Christian evangelical group)

    The Way International, Christian evangelical group founded in 1942 as Vesper Chimes, a radio ministry broadcast from Lima, Ohio, by Victor Paul Wierwille (1916–85). Its current headquarters are in New Knoxville, Ohio; estimates of its membership range from 3,000 to 20,000. As a minister in the

  • Way, John T. (British chemist)

    ion-exchange reaction: Early history: Thompson and chemist J.T. Way, describing the phenomenon of ion exchange as it occurs in soils. In his paper, entitled “On the Power of Soils to Absorb Manure,” Way addressed himself to the question of how soluble fertilizers like potassium chloride were retained by soils even after heavy…

  • way, right of (law)

    property law: Private land-use control: servitudes: The classic case is the right-of-way, whereby an owner agrees to allow a neighbour to cross his land in order to allow the neighbour to reach his own land. What distinguishes the right-of-way and similar interests from the myriad types of enforceable agreements not to sue is that the right-of-way…

  • Way, The Truth, and The Life, The (work by Hort)

    Fenton J. A. Hort: …essay on philosophical theology, The Way, The Truth, and The Life (1893), dealing with the coexistence of an open, critical mind with acceptance of biblical truths.

  • Way, Way Back, The (film by Faxon and Rash [2013])

    Toni Collette: In 2013 Collette appeared in The Way, Way Back, a humorous coming-of-age story, and the romantic comedy Enough Said. The next year she took a supporting role in the farcical Tammy and joined the ensemble casts of the drama A Long Way Down, the sentimental adventure Hector and the Search…

  • wayang (Indonesian theatre)

    Wayang, (Javanese: “shadow”), classical Javanese puppet drama that uses the shadows thrown by puppets manipulated by rods against a translucent screen lit from behind. Developed before the 10th century, the form had origins in the thalubomalata, the leather puppets of southern India. The art of

  • wayang golek (theatre)

    Richard Teschner: …the artistic potentialities of the Javanese rod puppet for western puppet theatre.

  • wayang kulit (Javanese theatre)

    South Asian arts: Folk theatre: They are similar to the wayang kulit puppets of Indonesia but are much smaller and quicker-moving.

  • wayang wong (Javanese theatre)

    wayang: …figures manipulated by rods; the wayang wong, a pantomime by live actors; and the wayang Krunchil, wooden puppets in low relief.

  • Wayans, Keenen Ivory (American actor)

    African Americans: Television and film: Keenen Ivory Wayans, star of the long-running satirical sketch comedy show In Living Color, won an Emmy Award for his work in 1990. The Bernie Mac Show, a sitcom starring comedian Bernie Mac, won a Peabody Award in 2001.

  • Wayburn, Edgar (American conservationist)

    Edgar Wayburn, American conservationist (born Sept. 17, 1906, Macon, Ga.—died March 5, 2010, San Francisco, Calif.), was awarded (1999) the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his leading role in helping to preserve more than 40 million ha (100 million ac) of North American wilderness. Wayburn

  • Waycross (Georgia, United States)

    Waycross, city, seat (1872) of Ware county, southeastern Georgia, U.S., on the coastal plain, about 50 miles (80 km) west of Brunswick. Early settlers had built blockhouses in the area by the 1820s as a protection against Native Americans. Originally the hub of stagecoach and pioneer trails,

  • Wayiqra? (Old Testament)

    Leviticus, (Latin: “And He Called”) third book of the Latin Vulgate Bible, the name of which designates its contents as a book (or manual) primarily concerned with the priests and their duties. Although Leviticus is basically a book of laws, it also contains some narrative (chapters 8–9, 10:1–7,

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