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  • Wayland the Smith (medieval literary figure)

    Wayland the Smith, in Scandinavian, German, and Anglo-Saxon legend, a smith of outstanding skill. He was, according to some legends, a lord of the elves. His story is told in the V?lundarkvida, one of the poems in the 13th-century Icelandic Elder, or Poetic, Edda, and, with variations, in the

  • Wayland’s Smithy (burial chamber, Berkshire, United Kingdom)

    Wayland the Smith: …Horse Hill, Berkshire, known as Wayland’s Smithy. A local legend says the chamber is haunted by an invisible smith who will shoe a horse for a traveler, provided that a coin is left on a stone and that the traveler absents himself while the work is in progress. If he…

  • Wayles, Martha (wife of Thomas Jefferson)

    Martha Jefferson, the wife of Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States (1801–09). She was never a first lady because she died 19 years before her husband became president. Martha Wayles married Bathurst Skelton in 1766, but he died two years later. The young widow returned to her

  • Wayllaqa (people)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The beginnings of external expansion: …mother, Mama Mikay, was a Huayllaca (Wayllaqa) woman who had been promised to the leader of another group called the Ayarmaca (’Ayarmaka). When the promise was broken and Mama Mikay married Inca Roca, the Ayarmaca went to war with the Huayllaca and were defeating them. As a peace offering, the…

  • Waymon, Eunice (American singer)

    Nina Simone, American singer who created urgent emotional intensity by singing songs of love, protest, and black empowerment in a dramatic style, with a rough-edged voice. A precocious child, Simone played piano and organ in girlhood. She became sensitive to racism when at age 12 she gave a piano

  • Wayna Qhapaq (emperor of Incas)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Huayna Capac: Topa Inca Yupanqui’s unexpected death in about 1493 precipitated a struggle for the succession. It appears that Topa Inca Yupanqui had originally favoured the succession of Huayna Capac (Wayna Qhapaq), the youngest son of his principal wife and sister. Shortly before his death,…

  • Wayne (New Jersey, United States)

    Wayne, township (town), Passaic county, northern New Jersey, U.S., 6 miles (10 km) west of Paterson, New Jersey. The site, first settled in 1695, was originally part of New Barbadoes township in Essex county, which was later incorporated into Bergen county. During the American Revolution the

  • Wayne (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Wayne, county, extreme northeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., bounded to the northeast and north by New York state (the West Branch Delaware and Delaware rivers constituting the boundary), to the southeast by Lake Wallenpaupack and Wallenpaupack Creek, and to the southwest by the Lehigh River. It

  • Wayne (county, New York, United States)

    Wayne, county, north-central New York state, U.S. It comprises a lowland region bordered by Lake Ontario to the north and intersected by the New York State Canal System (completed 1918), which incorporates the Erie Canal (1825). There are large marshes in the southeastern part of the county. Other

  • Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders (British musical group)

    British Invasion: …Dreamers (“I’m Telling You Now”), Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders (“Game of Love”), Herman’s Hermits (“Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter”), the Rolling Stones (“[I Can’t Get No] Satisfaction” and others), the Troggs (“Wild Thing”), and Donovan (“Sunshine Superman”) all topped

  • Wayne State University (university, Detroit, Michigan, United States)

    Wayne State University, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Detroit, Mich., U.S. It is a comprehensive research university, comprising colleges of education; engineering; fine, performing, and communication arts; liberal arts and sciences; nursing; and pharmacy and health

  • Wayne University (university, Detroit, Michigan, United States)

    Wayne State University, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Detroit, Mich., U.S. It is a comprehensive research university, comprising colleges of education; engineering; fine, performing, and communication arts; liberal arts and sciences; nursing; and pharmacy and health

  • Wayne, Anthony (United States general)

    Anthony Wayne, prominent American general during the Revolutionary War, who later destroyed the Northwest Indian Confederation at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in Ohio (August 20, 1794). The owner of a tannery and extensive property in Pennsylvania, Wayne was commissioned a colonel in the

  • Wayne, David (American actor)

    David Wayne, (WAYNE JAMES MCMEEKAN), U.S. actor (born Jan. 30, 1914, Traverse City, Mich.—died Feb. 9, 1995, Santa Monica, Calif.), took Broadway by storm as the leprechaun Og in Finian’s Rainbow (1947), a performance that earned him the first-ever Tony award for acting, and he went on to score a

  • Wayne, James M. (United States jurist)

    James M. Wayne, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1835–67). Wayne was admitted to the bar in 1810 and started to practice in Savannah. After the War of 1812 he was elected to the legislature for his opposition to an act suspending the collection of debts; he then served as mayor

  • Wayne, James Moore (United States jurist)

    James M. Wayne, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1835–67). Wayne was admitted to the bar in 1810 and started to practice in Savannah. After the War of 1812 he was elected to the legislature for his opposition to an act suspending the collection of debts; he then served as mayor

  • Wayne, John (American actor)

    John Wayne, major American motion-picture actor who embodied the image of the strong, taciturn cowboy or soldier and who in many ways personified the idealized American values of his era. Marion Morrison was the son of an Iowa pharmacist; he acquired the nickname “Duke” during his youth and billed

  • Wayne, Mad Anthony (United States general)

    Anthony Wayne, prominent American general during the Revolutionary War, who later destroyed the Northwest Indian Confederation at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in Ohio (August 20, 1794). The owner of a tannery and extensive property in Pennsylvania, Wayne was commissioned a colonel in the

  • Wayne, Marshall (American athlete)

    Marshall Wayne, American diver who won a gold medal in the platform diving event and a silver medal in the 3-m springboard diving competition at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin; his win in platform diving was said to have annoyed Adolf Hitler, who was eager for a German victory in the event; he

  • Waynesboro (Virginia, United States)

    Waynesboro, city, administratively independent of, but located in, Augusta county, north-central Virginia, U.S. It lies in the Shenandoah Valley along the South River, near the junction of Skyline Drive and the Blue Ridge Parkway, 28 miles (45 km) west of Charlottesville. The original settlement of

  • Waynflete, William of (British lord chancellor)

    William of Waynflete, English lord chancellor and bishop of Winchester who founded Magdalen College of the University of Oxford. Little is known of his early years, but he evidently earned a reputation as a scholar before becoming master of Winchester College in 1429. He became a fellow at Eton in

  • wayno (dance)

    Huay?o, couple dance of the Quechua and Aymara Indians and of many mestizos (people of Spanish-Indian descent) of Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. It antedates the Spanish conquest and was possibly an Inca funeral dance; today it is purely festive. A circle of dancing couples surrounds the musicians,

  • ways (ship building)

    ship construction: Launching: Standing structures called ways, constructed of concrete and wooden blocks, spaced about one-third of the vessel’s beam apart, support the ship under construction. The slope of the standing ways—which are often cambered (slightly curved upward toward the middle or slightly curved downward toward the ends) in the fore…

  • Ways and Means (work by Xenophon)

    Xenophon: Other writings: Also Athenocentric is Ways and Means, a plan to alleviate the city’s financial problems (and remove excuses for aggressive imperialism) by paying citizens a dole from taxes on foreign residents and from the profits generated by using state-owned slaves in the silver mines.

  • Ways and Means Committee (United States government)

    government budget: The United States: …under the jurisdiction of the Ways and Means Committee of the House and are considered separately and possibly even at a different time from appropriations. The upper house of Congress, the Senate, plays a secondary role with respect to the budget. Its Appropriations Committee acts as a kind of court…

  • Ways and Provinces, Book of (work by Ibn Haukal)

    map: The Middle Ages: Ibn Haukal wrote a Book of Ways and Provinces illustrated with maps, and al-Idrīsī constructed a world map in 1154 for the Christian king Roger of Sicily, showing better information on Asian areas than had been available theretofore. In Baghdad astronomers used the compass long before Europeans, studied the…

  • Ways to Spaceflight (work by Oberth)

    Hermann Oberth: Oberth’s Wege zur Raumschiffahrt (1929; Ways to Spaceflight) won the first annual Robert Esnault-Pelterie–André Hirsch Prize of 10,000 francs, enabling him to finance his research on liquid-propellant rocket motors. The book anticipated by 30 years the development of electric propulsion and of the ion rocket. In 1931 Oberth received a…

  • Wayss, G. A. (German engineer)

    bridge: Early bridges: …Hennebique and the German engineer G.A. Wayss, who bought the Monier patents. Hennebique’s Vienne River Bridge at Chatellerault, France, built in 1899, was the longest-spanning reinforced arch bridge of the 19th century. Built low to the river—typical of many reinforced-concrete bridges whose goal of safe passage across a small river…

  • Waza National Park (national park, Cameroon)

    Cameroon: Plant and animal life: Waza National Park in the north, which was originally created for the protection of elephants, giraffes, and antelope, abounds in both forest and savanna animals, including monkeys, baboons, lions, leopards, and birds that range from white and gray pelicans to spotted waders. To the south…

  • Wazhazhe (people)

    Osage, North American Indian tribe of the Dhegiha branch of the Siouan linguistic stock. The name Osage is an English rendering of the French phonetic version of the name the French understood to be that of the entire tribe. It was thereafter applied to all members of the tribe. The name Wa-zha-zhe

  • Waziba (people)

    Haya, East African people who speak a Bantu language (also called Haya) and inhabit the northwestern corner of Tanzania between the Kagera River and Lake Victoria. Two main ethnic elements exist in the population—the pastoral Hima, who are probably descendants of wandering Nilotes, and the more

  • wazīr (ancient Egyptian and Islamic official)

    Vizier, originally the chief minister or representative of the ?Abbāsid caliphs and later a high administrative officer in various Muslim countries, among Arabs, Persians, Turks, Mongols, and other eastern peoples. The office took shape during its tenure by the Barmakid (Barmecide) family in the

  • Wazīr, Khalīl Ibrāhīm al- (Palestinian leader)

    Khalīl Ibrāhīm al-Wazīr, Palestinian leader who became the military strategist and second in command of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). Wazīr fled from Ramla with his family during the 1948 war that followed the creation of the State of Israel. He grew up in the Gaza Strip, where he

  • Wazīrābād (Pakistan)

    Wazīrābād, town, northern Punjab province, Pakistan, just east of the Chenāb River. It is an important rail junction, with the Siālkot and Faisalābād (formerly Lyallpur) lines of the Pakistan Western Railway branching off and crossing the Chenāb River at the Alexandra Bridge. Industries include

  • Waziristan (region, Pakistan)

    Waziristan, geographic region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan. It is a barren, mountainous country occupied by part of the Sulaiman Range and bounded north by the Kurram River, south by the Gumal River, and west by Afghanistan. The region’s rivers, which flow toward the Indus River,

  • Wa?yk, Adam (Polish author)

    Adam Wa?yk, Polish poet and novelist who began his career as a propagandist for Stalinism but ended as one of its opponents. Wa?yk’s earliest volumes of poetry, Semafory (1924; “Semaphores”) and Oczy i usta (1926; “Eyes and Lips”), were written between the ages of 17 and 20 and reflect the

  • Wazzan, Shafiq Dib al- (prime minister of Lebanon)

    Shafiq Dib al-Wazzan, Lebanese politician who, as a moderate Sunni Muslim, was a compromise choice for prime minister (1980–82), but he failed in his attempts to end his country’s civil war, which had begun in 1975, or to implement the 1983 peace accord he negotiated with Israel, which had sent

  • Wb (unit of measurement)

    Weber, unit of magnetic flux in the International System of Units (SI), defined as the amount of flux that, linking an electrical circuit of one turn (one loop of wire), produces in it an electromotive force of one volt as the flux is reduced to zero at a uniform rate in one second. It was named

  • WBA (international sports organization)

    boxing: Professional organizations: …two organizations were established: the National Boxing Association, a private body, and the New York State Athletic Commission, a state agency. Divided control led to competing organizations’ sometimes recognizing different boxers as world champions at the same time. In Europe the ruling body was the International Boxing Union, which in…

  • WBAI (radio station, New York City, New York, United States)

    Pacifica Radio: …KPFK in Los Angeles (1959); WBAI in New York City (1960); KPFT in Houston (1970); and WPFW in Washington, D.C. (1977). Pacifica also funds and promotes news and public affairs programs, most notably Democracy Now! and Free Speech Radio News, for its own and nearly 100 affiliated community radio stations.…

  • WBC (international sports organization)

    boxing: Professional organizations: In the early 1960s the World Boxing Council (WBC) was formed, and the National Boxing Association changed its name to the World Boxing Association (WBA). The International Boxing Federation (IBF) was established in 1983, which added to an already convoluted situation. Since the 1980s it has been common for most…

  • WBC (American organization)

    Westboro Baptist Church, church in Topeka, Kansas, that became well known for its strident opposition to homosexuality and the gay rights movement, as expressed on picket signs carried by church members at funerals and other events. The church also demonstrated against other religions, most notably

  • WBCN (radio station, Boston, Massachusetts, United States)

    WBCN: While many progressive rock stations died painful, public deaths, one of the first—WBCN in Boston, Massachusetts—carried on. Founded in 1967 by Ray Riepen, club owner (the Boston Tea Party) and later underground newspaper publisher (The Phoenix), WBCN quickly grew in popularity and power. Its most…

  • WBCN

    While many progressive rock stations died painful, public deaths, one of the first—WBCN in Boston, Massachusetts—carried on. Founded in 1967 by Ray Riepen, club owner (the Boston Tea Party) and later underground newspaper publisher (The Phoenix), WBCN quickly grew in popularity and power. Its most

  • WCC

    World Council of Churches (WCC), Christian ecumenical organization founded in 1948 in Amsterdam as “a fellowship of Churches which accept Jesus Christ our Lord as God and Saviour.” The WCC is not a church, nor does it issue orders or directions to the churches. It works for the unity and renewal of

  • WCEU

    International Society of Christian Endeavor: The World’s Christian Endeavor Union, (WCEU), organized in 1895, is a cooperative organization for Christian Endeavor groups in more than 75 countries. It holds conventions every four years. Headquarters for both organizations are in Columbus, Ohio.

  • Wchinitz und Tettau, Gr?fin Kinsky, von (German author)

    Bertha, baroness von Suttner, Austrian novelist who was one of the first notable woman pacifists. She is credited with influencing Alfred Nobel in the establishment of the Nobel Prize for Peace, of which she was the recipient in 1905. Her major novel, Die Waffen nieder! (1889; Lay Down Your Arms!),

  • WCL

    World Confederation of Labour (WCL), labour confederation founded as the International Federation of Christian Trade Unions in 1920 to represent the interests of Christian labour unions in western Europe and Latin America. It was reconstituted under its present name in 1968. Although the

  • WCO (intergovernmental organization)

    World Customs Organization (WCO), intergovernmental organization established as the Customs Co-operation Council (CCC) in 1952 to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of customs administrations worldwide. In 1948 a study group of the Committee for European Economic Cooperation, a precursor of

  • WCT (international sports organization)

    tennis: Professional and open tennis: …Cup captain George MacCall, and World Championship Tennis (WCT), founded by New Orleans promoter Dave Dixon and funded by Dallas oil and football tycoon Lamar Hunt. Between them they signed a significant number of the world’s top players, professional and amateur.

  • WCTU

    Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), American temperance organization, founded in November 1874 in Cleveland, Ohio, in response to the “Woman’s Crusade,” a series of temperance demonstrations that swept through New York and much of the Midwest in 1873–74. Annie Wittenmyer, an experienced

  • WCW (American company)

    Vince McMahon: …magnate Ted Turner and renamed World Championship Wrestling [WCW]) experienced a resurgence, and its cable broadcasts soon surpassed those of the WWF in viewership. McMahon responded by hiring new writers to create soap-opera-like story lines. Skimpily clad female wrestlers became prominent, as did “colourful language” (profanity) and “sign language” (obscene…

  • WDF (British organization)

    darts: …the founder member of the World Darts Federation (WDF), which represents more than 500,000 darts players in 50 countries. The major championships are the Winmau World Masters, the WDF World Cup, and the Embassy World Professional Darts Championship.

  • WDI

    World Development Indicators (WDI), comprehensive set of data and statistics published annually by the World Bank that allows for the evaluation of the development of most countries in the world. The availability of World Development Indicators (WDI) enables more-informed public and private policy

  • WDIA (radio station, Memphis, Tennessee, United States)

    WDIA: Black Music Mother Station: When WDIA went on the air in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1948, its white owners, Bert Ferguson and John R. Pepper, were anything but blues aficionados; however, deejay Nat D. Williams was. A former high-school history teacher and journalist, Williams brought his own records and his…

  • WDIA: Black Music Mother Station

    When WDIA went on the air in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1948, its white owners, Bert Ferguson and John R. Pepper, were anything but blues aficionados; however, deejay Nat D. Williams was. A former high-school history teacher and journalist, Williams brought his own records and his familiarity with

  • WDR (radio station, Cologne, Germany)

    Cologne: Cultural life: …the concert hall of the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR; “West German Radio”), the high reputation of the latter being largely due to the WDR’s encouragement of contemporary music. A full repertoire is offered in theatre and opera as well, and the municipal theatre has its own ballet ensemble.

  • We (Mesopotamian deity)

    Mesopotamian religion: Myths: …one of their number—the god We, apparently the ringleader who “had the idea”—be killed and humankind created from clay mixed with his flesh and blood, so that the toil of the gods could be laid on humankind and the gods left to go free. But after Enki and the birth…

  • We (people)

    African art: Dan-We: The Dan-We complex of styles is named after two extremes of stylistic variation: the smooth, restrained style of the Dan, the De, and the Diomande and the grotesque style of the We (the Guere, the Wobe, and the Kran), a less-extreme form of which…

  • We (work by Zamyatin)

    Brave New World: Historical context: …accused of plagiarizing the novel My by Yevgeny Zamyatin, written in 1920 and published in English as We in the United States in 1924. Huxley denied having read the book, and the similarities between the novels can be seen as an expression of common fears surrounding the rapid advancement of…

  • We Are All Khaled Said (Facebook page)

    Wael Ghonim: …the administrator of the “We Are All Khaled Said” page. He praised the Egyptian protesters’ courage and wept when he was shown pictures of protesters who had been killed. The interview is often credited with having reenergized the Egyptian protest movement after a week of violent reprisals by the…

  • We Are Displaced (work by Yousafzai)

    Malala Yousafzai: Shooting and Nobel Peace Prize: …as her own displacement in We Are Displaced (2019).

  • We Are Family (song by Sister Sledge)

    Joni Sledge: “We Are Family” remained an R&amp;B staple and was used as a theme song for Major League Baseball’s Pittsburgh Pirates during their 1979 championship run. It later became an anthem for both feminist and gay rights groups. Another single from the album, “Lost in Music,”…

  • We Are Going (poetry by Noonuccal)

    Oodgeroo Noonuccal: Her first volume of poetry, We Are Going (1964), is the first book by an Aboriginal woman to be published.

  • We Are in Love (album by Connick)

    Harry Connick, Jr.: …1990 he released two albums, We Are in Love, a big-band sound with vocals, and Lofty’s Roach Soufflé, showcasing instrumental jazz. Connick won a second Grammy Award for best jazz vocal performance for We Are in Love. Connick’s subsequent albums included Blue Light, Red Light (1991), 25 (1992), She (1994),…

  • We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (recording by Swift)

    Taylor Swift: Kanye West incident at the VMAs, Red, and 1989: …lead single, the gleeful “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” gave Swift her first number-one hit on the Billboard pop singles chart.

  • We Are Pirates (book by Handler [2015])

    Daniel Handler: …a futuristic San Francisco, and We Are Pirates (2015), about a contemporary teenager who develops an interest in piracy. Handler later explored teeenage sexuality in All the Dirty Parts (2017), which centres on a 17-year-old boy. The dark comedy Bottle Grove was published in 2019. He also wrote Why We…

  • We Are the Champions (song by Queen)

    Queen: …followed in 1977 with “We Are the Champions” and “We Will Rock You”—which became ubiquitous anthems at sporting events in Britain and the United States. The Game (1980), featuring “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” and “Another One Bites the Dust,” was Queen’s first number one album in the United…

  • We Are the World (song by Jackson and Richie)

    Lionel Richie: In 1985 Richie wrote “We Are the World” with pop icon Michael Jackson to raise money for African famine relief; the song generated some $50 million in donations and received a Grammy for song of the year.

  • We Are What We Pretend to Be (work by Vonnegut)

    Kurt Vonnegut: We Are What We Pretend to Be (2012) comprised an early unpublished novella and a fragment of a novel unfinished at his death. A selection of his correspondence was published as Letters (2012).

  • We Barrymores (work by Barrymore)

    Lionel Barrymore: We Barrymores (1951), by Lionel Barrymore as told to Cameron Shipp, is basically an autobiography but contains much information on his famous siblings, John and Ethel.

  • We Belong Together (song by Newman)

    Randy Newman: …Oscar, for the song “We Belong Together” from the latter film. He also scored Cars 3 (2017) and Toy Story 4 (2019). His song (“I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away”) for the latter film and his score for the drama Marriage Story (2019) earned Newman his 21st and…

  • We Bought a Zoo (film by Crowe [2011])

    Matt Damon: The Departed, Invictus, and True Grit: …about a deadly virus; and We Bought a Zoo, adapted from a memoir about a family who moves to a wildlife park. Damon then wrote with costar John Krasinski the drama Promised Land (2012), in which Damon played a gas-company representative seeking to obtain drilling rights in a rural community.

  • We Can Remember It for You Wholesale (work by Dick)

    Philip K. Dick: …adapted for film, including “We Can Remember It for You Wholesale” (filmed as Total Recall [1990 and 2012]), “Second Variety” (filmed as Screamers [1995]), “The Minority Report” (filmed as Minority Report [2002]), and A Scanner Darkly (1977; film 2006). The Man in the High Castle was loosely adapted as…

  • We Damn Your Memory! The Confederate Statue Controversy

    In choosing to remove monuments honoring figures now viewed as objectionable, contemporary Americans are in a world-historical majority. Removing statues is a recourse with a long history. Popular revolutions often bring down statues of hated rulers—one recalls the destruction of Saddam Hussein’s

  • We Didn’t Mean to Go To Sea (work by Ransome)

    Arthur Ransome: …children’s literature; however, its successor, We Didn’t Mean to Go to Sea (1937), is widely considered Ransome’s masterpiece.

  • We Live Again (film by Mamoulian [1934])

    Rouben Mamoulian: Films of the 1930s: Although We Live Again (1934) was a generally undistinguished adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s novel Resurrection (1899), Mamoulian had a much firmer grasp on William Makepeace Thackeray’s comedy of manners Vanity Fair (1847–48), which he brought to the screen as Becky Sharp (1935). That film also had…

  • We Love Glenda So Much, and Other Tales (short stories by Cortázar)

    Julio Cortázar: …Glenda, y otros relatos (1981; We Love Glenda So Much, and Other Tales). Cortázar also wrote poetry and plays and published numerous volumes of essays.

  • We May Never Love Like This Again (song by Hirschhorn and Kasha)
  • We Murderers (play by Kamban)

    Gudmundur Kamban: …“Marble”) and Vi mordere (1920; We Murderers), as well as in his first novel, Ragnar Finnsson (1922), all of which are set in America, attention is focused on crime and punishment. Questions about societal versus personal responsibility are posed with compassion for the human individual and are closely linked to…

  • We Remember: A Reflection on the Shoah (Vatican document)

    anti-Semitism: Anti-Semitism since the Holocaust and outside Europe: …published a document titled “We Remember: A Reflection on the Shoah,” which called upon the faithful to reflect upon the lessons of the Shoah (the Holocaust). In presenting that document, Edward Idris Cardinal Cassidy, president of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, said, “Whenever there…

  • We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions (album by Springsteen)

    Bruce Springsteen: Back with the E Street Band and into the 21st century: We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions (2006) took a turn unanticipated by even the closest Springsteen observers. He made the recording over a period of 10 years with a folk-roots band and a horn section. It featured traditional American folk songs (“Oh, Mary, Don’t You…

  • We the People (sculpture project by Vo)

    Danh Vo: …as well, as seen in We the People (2010–13), for which he commissioned a full-scale copper replica, in fragments, of Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi’s iconic Liberty Enlightening the World that he simultaneously installed at sites spanning the globe. Rather than reassemble the replica for future exhibits, Danh Vo sought to place pieces…

  • We the People (American organization)

    Jerry Brown: …he operated the political organization We the People, which sponsored programs and initiatives aimed at education and sustainable food production, including a daily radio program hosted by Brown. It was also the base for Brown’s successful 1998 mayoral campaign. He served two terms as mayor of Oakland and was considered…

  • We Were Dancing (film by Leonard [1942])

    Robert Z. Leonard: Later films: We Were Dancing (1942), a laboured adaptation of No?l Coward’s Tonight at 8:30, was notable for being one of Shearer’s last pictures. Leonard made a rare foray into the war genre with Stand By for Action (1942), a patriotic World War II yarn featuring Taylor…

  • We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank (album by Modest Mouse)

    Modest Mouse: ” The band’s follow-up We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank (2007) debuted at the top of Billboard’s Top 200 albums chart. After a prolonged hiatus, Modest Mouse released Strangers to Ourselves in 2015.

  • We Were Eight Years in Power (essays by Coates)

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: In the essay collection We Were Eight Years in Power (2017), which included work previously published in The Atlantic, Coates explored the presidency of Barack Obama as well as the subsequent election of Donald Trump.

  • We Were Strangers (film by Huston [1949])

    John Huston: Films of the 1940s: …was then the setting for We Were Strangers (1949), an atmospheric account of revolutionaries’ attempt to overthrow the government, which starred Jennifer Jones and John Garfield.

  • We Will Rock You (song by Queen)

    Queen: …Are the Champions” and “We Will Rock You”—which became ubiquitous anthems at sporting events in Britain and the United States. The Game (1980), featuring “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” and “Another One Bites the Dust,” was Queen’s first number one album in the United States. Their popularity waned for…

  • We’ll Meet Again (song by Parker and Charles)

    Vera Lynn: …would become her trademark song—“We’ll Meet Again,” written earlier that year by two young composers—on the show. The wistful tune, as interpreted by Lynn in her characteristic low pitch, articulated the longings of families and lovers separated by the war and thus became a touchstone to many. Lynn was…

  • We’ll Meet Again (novel by Clark)

    Mary Higgins Clark: …My Pretty One Sleeps (1989), We’ll Meet Again (1999), Daddy’s Gone a Hunting (2013), and I’ve Got My Eyes on You (2018). Several of Clark’s novels and stories were adapted into films.

  • We’ll to the Woods No More (novel by Dujardin)

    édouard Dujardin: …“The Laurels Are Cut Down”; We’ll to the Woods No More), which was the first work to employ the interior monologue from which James Joyce derived the stream-of-consciousness technique he used in Ulysses.

  • We’re Not Dressing (film by Taurog [1934])

    Norman Taurog: Musical comedies and Boys Town: …stayed in that genre for We’re Not Dressing (1934), which was one of his best efforts at Paramount. It starred Bing Crosby as a sailor who takes charge of a group of shipwrecked socialites (Carole Lombard and Merman, among others); George Burns and Gracie Allen appeared as anthropologists. Mrs. Wiggs…

  • We’re Not Married (film by Goulding [1952])

    Edmund Goulding: The 1950s: …elderly counterfeiter (Edmund Gwenn), and We’re Not Married (1952) was a Nunnally Johnson-penned concoction about five couples who discover that their wedding ceremonies were not performed legally; the cast included Eve Arden, Fred Allen, Eddie Bracken, Zsa Zsa Gabor, and Marilyn Monroe. After directing the musical Down Among the Sheltering…

  • We’re Only in It for the Money (album by the Mothers of Invention)

    Frank Zappa: …of the Mothers’ third album, We’re Only in It for the Money (1968), parodied that of Sgt. Pepper’s, just as the music challenged the Beatles’ visions of love and beauty with the deliberate “ugliness” with which Zappa assailed what he saw as the totalitarian philistinism of the establishment and the…

  • We’re the Millers (film by Thurber [2013])

    Jennifer Aniston: In We’re the Millers (2013), she portrayed an exotic dancer who poses as a mother in a scheme to smuggle marijuana from Mexico into the United States. She appeared as a kidnapping victim in the comedy Life of Crime (2013), based on the novel The Switch…

  • We, the Living (novel by Rand)

    Ayn Rand: The Fountainhead: Her first published novel, We the Living (1936), was a romantic tragedy in which Soviet totalitarianism epitomized the inherent evils of collectivism, which she understood as the subordination of individual interests to those of the state. A subsequent novella, Anthem (1938), portrayed a future collectivist dystopia in which the…

  • WEA (British organization)

    Albert Mansbridge: …the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA; originally called An Association to Promote the Higher Education of Working Men). The WEA was quickly recognized by most British universities, and in 1905 Mansbridge abandoned clerical work to become its full-time general secretary.

  • WEA (religious organization)

    World Evangelical Alliance (WEA), international fellowship of organizations that hold biblically conservative interpretations of the Christian faith. From 1846 until the mid-1900s, the World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) was primarily the venture of its founding member, the British Evangelical

  • WEA (American organization)

    Davenport v. Washington Education Association: …other nonunion members of the Washington Education Association (WEA), the state’s largest teacher union, filed a lawsuit against the WEA, claiming that it had failed to obtain the affirmative authorization required in Section 760; the state of Washington also brought a similar suit against the WEA (Washington v. Washington Education…

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