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  • WEAF (radio station, New York City, New York, United States)

    radio: The role of advertising: …New York City radio station, WEAF, began selling time for “toll broadcasting.” Its first radio commercial, broadcast on August 22, 1922, was a 15-minute real-estate ad offering apartments in Jackson Heights, Queens. But acceptance of radio advertising was slow, as broadcasters did not want to offend listeners. Early ads promoted…

  • Weah, George (president of Liberia)

    George Weah, Liberian football (soccer) player and politician. He was named African, European, and World Player of the Year in 1995—an unprecedented achievement. His talents on the field were equaled by his activism on behalf of his homeland, where he worked to bring an end to a long civil war and

  • Weah, George Oppong (president of Liberia)

    George Weah, Liberian football (soccer) player and politician. He was named African, European, and World Player of the Year in 1995—an unprecedented achievement. His talents on the field were equaled by his activism on behalf of his homeland, where he worked to bring an end to a long civil war and

  • weak anthropic principle (cosmology)

    anthropic principle: Forms of the anthropic principle: The weak anthropic principle (WAP) is the truism that the universe must be found to possess those properties necessary for the existence of observers. The WAP is not a theory of physics. Rather, it is a methodological principle. It is therefore not appropriate to ask if…

  • weak boson (subatomic particle)

    Intermediate vector boson, type of boson associated with the electromagnetic and weak forces in unified form. See W

  • weak completeness (logic)

    formal logic: Axiomatization of PC: …is complete (or, more specifically, weakly complete) if every valid wff is a theorem. The axiomatic system PM can be shown to be both sound and complete relative to the criterion of validity already given (see above Validity in PC).

  • weak electrolyte (physics)

    liquid: Weak electrolytes: While classification under the heading electrolyte-solution or nonelectrolyte-solution is often useful, some solutions have properties near the boundary between these two broad classes. Although such substances as ordinary salt and hydrogen chloride are strong electrolytes—i.e., they dissociate completely in an ionizing solvent—there are…

  • weak flour

    cereal processing: Wheat: varieties and characteristics: …preferred for bread manufacture and weak flours for cakes and biscuits. Strong flours are high in protein content, and their gluten has a pleasing elasticity; weak flours are low in protein, and their weak, flowy gluten produces a soft, flowy dough.

  • weak focusing

    particle accelerator: Synchrotrons: This arrangement resulted in a weak focusing effect that was adequate for machines in which the dimensions of the magnet gap could be appreciable in comparison with the radius of the orbit. The magnitude of the magnetic fields that may be used is limited by the saturation of the iron…

  • weak force (physics)

    Weak interaction, a fundamental force of nature that underlies some forms of radioactivity, governs the decay of unstable subatomic particles such as mesons, and initiates the nuclear fusion reaction that fuels the Sun. The weak interaction acts upon left-handed fermions—i.e., elementary particles

  • weak gauge boson (subatomic particle)

    Intermediate vector boson, type of boson associated with the electromagnetic and weak forces in unified form. See W

  • weak interaction (physics)

    Weak interaction, a fundamental force of nature that underlies some forms of radioactivity, governs the decay of unstable subatomic particles such as mesons, and initiates the nuclear fusion reaction that fuels the Sun. The weak interaction acts upon left-handed fermions—i.e., elementary particles

  • weak law of large numbers (statistics)

    Law of large numbers, in statistics, the theorem that, as the number of identically distributed, randomly generated variables increases, their sample mean (average) approaches their theoretical mean. The law of large numbers was first proved by the Swiss mathematician Jakob Bernoulli in 1713. He

  • weak lensing (cosmological phenomenon)

    dark energy: …a phenomenon known as “weak lensing.” At some point in the last few billion years, dark energy became dominant in the universe and thus prevented more galaxies and clusters of galaxies from forming. This change in the structure of the universe is revealed by weak lensing. Another measure comes…

  • weak nuclear interaction (physics)

    Weak interaction, a fundamental force of nature that underlies some forms of radioactivity, governs the decay of unstable subatomic particles such as mesons, and initiates the nuclear fusion reaction that fuels the Sun. The weak interaction acts upon left-handed fermions—i.e., elementary particles

  • weak nulcear force (physics)

    Weak interaction, a fundamental force of nature that underlies some forms of radioactivity, governs the decay of unstable subatomic particles such as mesons, and initiates the nuclear fusion reaction that fuels the Sun. The weak interaction acts upon left-handed fermions—i.e., elementary particles

  • weak principle of equivalence (physics)

    gravity: Gravitational fields and the theory of general relativity: The first is the weak principle of equivalence. Newton himself performed experiments with pendulums that demonstrated the principle to better than one part in 1,000 for a variety of materials, and, at the beginning of the 20th century, the Hungarian physicist Roland, Baron von E?tv?s, showed that different materials…

  • weak vector boson (subatomic particle)

    Intermediate vector boson, type of boson associated with the electromagnetic and weak forces in unified form. See W

  • weakened rhyme (linguistics)

    rhyme: Weakened, or unaccented, rhyme occurs when the relevant syllable of the rhyming word is unstressed (bend / frightened). Because of the way in which lack of stress affects the sound, a rhyme of this kind may often be regarded as consonance, which occurs when the…

  • weakfish (fish)

    Weakfish, (genus Cynoscion), any member of a group of fishes in the croaker family, Sciaenidae (order Perciformes). A half dozen species inhabit the coastal regions of North America. The weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) is a marine sport fish but is usually less than 60 cm (2 feet) long. Much larger s

  • weakly interacting massive particle (astrophysics)

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), heavy, electromagnetically neutral subatomic particle that is hypothesized to make up most dark matter and therefore some 22 percent of the universe. These particles are thought to be heavy and slow moving because if the dark matter particles were light

  • weakon (subatomic particle)

    Intermediate vector boson, type of boson associated with the electromagnetic and weak forces in unified form. See W

  • WEAL (American organization)

    Women’s Equity Action League (WEAL), former national women’s organization committed to improving the status of women in the United States through legal action and lobbying for institutional and legislative change. Established and incorporated in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1968 by Elizabeth Boyer and local

  • Weald, The (region, England, United Kingdom)

    The Weald, ancient raised tract of forest nearly 40 miles (64 km) wide in southeastern England, separating the London basin from the English Channel coast. The Weald (Saxon: Andredsweald) is developed on an eroded dome of varied rock strata, and the chalk Downs (both North and South) compose a

  • Wealden (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Wealden, district, administrative county of East Sussex, historic county of Sussex, southeastern England. Hailsham, in the south-central part of the district, is the administrative centre. The district takes its name from The Weald, a region of forested ridges that lies between the chalk hills of

  • Wealden Series (geology)

    Gideon Algernon Mantell: …the freshwater origin of the Wealden series of the Cretaceous Period, and from them he brought to light and described the remarkable dinosaurian reptiles known as Iguanodon, Hylaeosaurus, Pelorosaurus, and Regnosaurus. He also described the Triassic reptile Telerpeton elginense. Mantell’s major works include The Fossils of the South Downs, or

  • Wealth (work by Carnegie)

    Andrew Carnegie: …his most famous article, “Wealth,” appearing in the June 1889 issue of the North American Review, outlined what came to be called the Gospel of Wealth. This doctrine held that a man who accumulates great wealth has a duty to use his surplus wealth for “the improvement of mankind”…

  • wealth (economics)

    luxury: …a relatively large consumption of wealth for nonessential pleasures. There is, however, no absolute definition of luxury, for the conception is relative to both time and person. It is a commonplace of history that the luxuries of one generation may become the necessities of a later period; thus, no hard…

  • Wealth (play by Aristophanes)

    Aristophanes: Wealth: The last of Aristophanes’ plays to be performed in his lifetime, Wealth (388 bce; Greek Ploutos; also called “the second Wealth” to distinguish it from an earlier play, now lost, of the same title) is a somewhat moralizing work. It may have inaugurated the…

  • wealth and income, distribution of (economics)

    Distribution of wealth and income, the way in which the wealth and income of a nation are divided among its population, or the way in which the wealth and income of the world are divided among nations. Such patterns of distribution are discerned and studied by various statistical means, all of

  • Wealth in the Hands of the Few (work by Hayes)
  • Wealth of Nations, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the (work by Smith)

    Adam Smith: The Wealth of Nations: Despite its renown as the first great work in political economy, The Wealth of Nations is in fact a continuation of the philosophical theme begun in The Theory of Moral Sentiments. The ultimate problem to which Smith addresses himself is how…

  • wealth tax (economics)

    income tax: Ease of administration: …tax on spending) or a wealth tax (a tax on one’s worth—as opposed to a tax on one’s earnings). An income tax fails, however, to calculate the effects of inflation and timing issues in the measurement of income. Inflation erodes the real value of interest income and of deductions for…

  • wealth, distribution of (economics)

    Distribution of wealth and income, the way in which the wealth and income of a nation are divided among its population, or the way in which the wealth and income of the world are divided among nations. Such patterns of distribution are discerned and studied by various statistical means, all of

  • weaning (biology)

    lactation: Weaning and the cessation of lactation: There is no typical age at which human infants are weaned, for this varies from country to country and among the social classes of a nation. In India women in the higher socioeconomic groups tend to use artificial feeding,…

  • weapon (military technology)

    Weapon, an instrument used in combat for the purpose of killing, injuring, or defeating an enemy. A weapon may be a shock weapon, held in the hands, such as the club, mace, or sword. It may also be a missile weapon, operated by muscle power (as with the javelin, sling, and bow and arrow),

  • weapon of mass destruction (weaponry)

    Weapon of mass destruction (WMD), weapon with the capacity to inflict death and destruction on such a massive scale and so indiscriminately that its very presence in the hands of a hostile power can be considered a grievous threat. Modern weapons of mass destruction are either nuclear, biological,

  • weapon platform (military technology)

    weapon: …variety of vehicles, often called weapon platforms. These have included such naval craft as the ship of the line, battleship, submarine, and aircraft carrier; aircraft such as the fighter, bomber, and helicopter; and ground vehicles such as the chariot and tank.

  • Weapons and Hope (work by Dyson)

    Freeman Dyson: …a number of books, including Weapons and Hope (1984), Origins of Life (1985), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Imagined Worlds (1998), and The Sun, the Genome, and the Internet (1999). Disturbing the Universe (1979) and the epistolary Maker of Patterns (2018) are autobiographies.

  • weapons inspection (UN)

    Iraq: The UN embargo and oil-for-food program: …UN Special Commission (UNSCOM) to inspect and verify that Iraq was complying with the ban on WMD. By mid-1991, however, it was becoming clear that the embargo would very likely last longer than had been originally expected and that, in the meantime, the people of Iraq needed humanitarian aid. Thus,…

  • Weapons of Mass Destruction Committee (international organization)

    Hans Blix: …the executive chairman of the Weapons of Mass Destruction Committee, an autonomous international organization based in Sweden.

  • weapons system (military technology)

    Weapons system, any integrated system, usually computerized, for the control and operation of weapons of a particular kind. Intercontinental ballistic missiles, long-range bombers, and antiballistic missiles are the weaponry of the strategic weapons system (q.v.). Guided missiles operating at

  • Weapons System Engineering Course (American military technology program)

    Charles Stark Draper: With the creation of the Weapons System Engineering Course in 1952, Draper institutionalized one mechanism for the development of a technological intelligentsia within the armed services and made the lab a centre for producing both guidance systems and the people to use them. Graduates of the program were among inertial…

  • wear (physics)

    Wear, the removal of material from a solid surface as a result of mechanical action exerted by another solid. Wear chiefly occurs as a progressive loss of material resulting from the mechanical interaction of two sliding surfaces under load. Wear is such a universal phenomenon that rarely do two

  • Wear Valley (former district, England, United Kingdom)

    Wear Valley, former district, administrative and historic county of Durham, northeastern England, in the northwestern part of the county. Lying mostly within a section of the Pennines, Wear Valley is predominantly a high, bleak limestone upland, 1,000 to 2,300 feet (305 to 700 metres) in elevation,

  • Wear, River (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Wear, river that rises near Wearhead in the county of Durham, England, and enters the North Sea at Sunderland. With headwaters in the Pennines, it flows through Weardale and once entered the sea in the vicinity of Hartlepool, but it was subsequently diverted northward. Durham city is built

  • wear-resistant ceramics

    Tribological ceramics, ceramic materials that are resistant to friction and wear. They are employed in a variety of industrial and domestic applications, including mineral processing and metallurgy. This article surveys the principal tribological ceramic materials and their areas of application.

  • wear-resistant steel (metallurgy)

    steel: Wear-resistant steels: Another group is the wear-resistant steels, made into wear plates for rock-processing machinery, crushers, and power shovels. These are austenitic steels that contain about 1.2 percent carbon and 12 percent manganese. The latter element is a strong austenizer; that is, it keeps steel…

  • Wearable Technology

    The rapid advances in Wearable technology in 2014 underscored the prediction by Forbes magazine, which at the close of 2013 proclaimed that “2014 Will Be the Year of Wearable Technology.” A proliferation of smart watches, activity-monitoring devices, and smart eyewear signaled the most-recent spike

  • Wearing of the Green, The (Irish ballad)

    James Napper Tandy: …in the Irish ballad “The Wearing of the Green”:

  • Wearne, Alice Eileen (Australian athlete)

    Eileen Wearne, Australian athlete (born Jan. 30, 1912, Sydney, Australia—died July 6, 2007, Sydney), was only the second woman to represent Australia in track and field at the Olympic Games. After winning the triathlon (100-m sprint, high jump, and javelin) at the New South Wales athletics

  • Weary Blues, The (work by Hughes)

    African American literature: Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Countee Cullen: …jazz and blues poetry in The Weary Blues (1926) and Fine Clothes to the Jew (1927). While McKay and Hughes embraced the rank and file of black America and proudly identified themselves as black poets, Cullen sought success through writing in traditional forms and employing a lyricism informed by the…

  • Weary Willie (clown)

    Emmett Kelly: …known for his role as Weary Willie, a mournful tramp dressed in tattered clothes and made up with a growth of beard and a bulbous nose.

  • Weary Willie and Tired Tim (comic strip)

    comic strip: Europe: …well as Tom Browne’s tramps Weary Willie and Tired Tim. The latter strip was sponsored in 1896 by the publisher Alfred Harmsworth and was originally intended for the newly literate and semiliterate masses, but it developed into children’s fare.

  • weasel (mammal)

    Weasel, any of various small carnivores with very elongated slender bodies. Most live in the Northern Hemisphere and belong to the genus Mustela, which in addition to weasels proper includes 17 species of ferrets and polecats as well as the mink and the ermine. Along with their tubelike bodies,

  • weather

    Weather, state of the atmosphere at a particular place during a short period of time. It involves such atmospheric phenomena as temperature, humidity, precipitation (type and amount), air pressure, wind, and cloud cover. Weather differs from climate in that the latter includes the synthesis of

  • weather bureau

    Weather bureau, agency established by many nations to observe and report the weather and to issue weather forecasts and warnings of weather and flood conditions affecting national safety, welfare, and economy. In each country the national weather bureau strongly affects almost every citizen’s life,

  • weather calendar (ancient meteorology)

    Conon of Samos: …and Sicily, Conon compiled the parapegma, a calendar of meteorological forecasts and of the risings and settings of the stars. He settled in Alexandria, where he served as court astronomer to Ptolemy III Euergetes I (reigned 246–221). When Berenice II, the consort of Ptolemy III, dedicated her hair as an…

  • Weather Conspiracy, The (United States government document)

    climate: Climate, humans, and human affairs: …were published under the title The Weather Conspiracy. In the late 1970s, Harvard University’s Center for International Affairs addressed these issues in a book by English diplomat and environmentalist Crispin Tickell titled Climatic Change and World Affairs. Tickell sounded a warning:

  • Weather Extremes of 2012–2013: Taking Cues from Climate Change?, The

    Extremes of heat, cold, storms, and snow affected hundreds of millions of people during 2012 and 2013. Scientists investigated whether climate change was to blame for some or all of these events. They also tried to explain why 2013 was so different from 2012 and determine whether record snowfall

  • weather forecasting

    Weather forecasting, the prediction of the weather through application of the principles of physics, supplemented by a variety of statistical and empirical techniques. In addition to predictions of atmospheric phenomena themselves, weather forecasting includes predictions of changes on Earth’s

  • weather god

    Anatolian religion: Religions of the Hittites, Hattians, and Hurrians: …for a word) to indicate weather god, sun god, moon god, and so forth, it seems that the deity of each city was regarded by the Hittite theologians as a distinct personality. There are even special weather gods, such as the weather god of the lightning, the weather god of…

  • Weather Makers: The History & Future Impact of Climate Change, The (work by Flannery)

    Tim Flannery: With his international best seller The Weather Makers: The History &amp; Future Impact of Climate Change (2005), Flannery became the most prominent of Australia’s scientists arguing for measures to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions. (A companion volume, We Are the Weather Makers [2006], was written for younger readers.) The book clearly spelled…

  • weather map (meteorology)

    Weather map, any map or chart that shows the meteorological elements at a given time over an extended area. The earliest weather charts were made by collecting synchronous weather reports by mail. However, it was not until 1816 that German physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Brandes created the first

  • weather modification

    Weather modification, the deliberate or the inadvertent alternation of atmospheric conditions by human activity, sufficient to modify the weather on local or regional scales. Humans have long sought to purposefully alter such atmospheric phenomena as clouds, rain, snow, hail, lightning,

  • Weather Project, The (work by Eliasson)

    Olafur Eliasson: …Modern in London, he exhibited The Weather Project, a 50-foot (15-metre) in diameter orb resembling a dark afternoon sun made of 200 yellow lamps, diffusing screen, fog, and mirrors. During its five-month installation, more than two million visitors basked in the sun’s artificial glow, interacting with the constructed environment as…

  • Weather Report (American band)

    Wayne Shorter: …player Joe Zawinul together led Weather Report, a fusion band that explored an uncommon variety of sound colours. He returned frequently to the tenor saxophone and in later years led his own fusion music groups.

  • weather satellite

    Weather satellite, any of a class of Earth satellites designed to monitor meteorological conditions (see Earth

  • weather service

    Weather bureau, agency established by many nations to observe and report the weather and to issue weather forecasts and warnings of weather and flood conditions affecting national safety, welfare, and economy. In each country the national weather bureau strongly affects almost every citizen’s life,

  • weather station

    weather forecasting: Establishment of weather-station networks and services: Routine production of synoptic weather maps became possible after networks of stations were organized to take measurements and report them to some type of central observatory. As early as 1814, U.S. Army Medical Corps personnel were ordered to record weather data…

  • Weather Systems (album by Bird)

    Andrew Bird: …of solo gigs, Bird recorded Weather Systems (2003) at his family’s rural Illinois farm. The album marked a turning point in his songwriting; the idiosyncratic pre-rock-and-roll touches were now filtered through a sound that owed more to contemporary folk and pop-rock music than his previous pastiche-driven work had. (He also,…

  • Weather Underground (American militant group)

    Weather Underground, militant group of young white Americans formed in 1969 that grew out of the anti-Vietnam War movement. The Weather Underground, originally known as Weatherman, evolved from the Third World Marxists, a faction within Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the major national

  • Weather Underground Organization (American militant group)

    Weather Underground, militant group of young white Americans formed in 1969 that grew out of the anti-Vietnam War movement. The Weather Underground, originally known as Weatherman, evolved from the Third World Marxists, a faction within Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the major national

  • weather vane (instrument)

    folk art: Specific folk categories: …(laundry beaters), molds, decorated eggs, weather vanes, decoys, powder horns, trade signs, scarecrows, and figureheads, to name a few. There are also significant objects categorized according to function; for example, animal gear represented by the woven harness of donkeys in Spain, carved and painted ox yokes and sheep collars, brass-studded…

  • weather warning (meteorology)

    weather forecasting: Predictive skills and procedures: Weather warnings are a special kind of short-range forecast; the protection of human life is the forecaster’s greatest challenge and source of pride. The first national weather forecasting service in the United States (the predecessor of the Weather Bureau) was in fact formed, in 1870,…

  • weather watch (meteorology)

    weather forecasting: Predictive skills and procedures: …the tornado or severe thunderstorm watch, which is the forecast prepared by the SELS forecaster, and the warning, which is usually released by a local observing facility. The watch may be issued when the skies are clear, and it usually covers a number of counties. It alerts the affected area…

  • weather worship

    Anatolian religion: Religions of the Hittites, Hattians, and Hurrians: …for a word) to indicate weather god, sun god, moon god, and so forth, it seems that the deity of each city was regarded by the Hittite theologians as a distinct personality. There are even special weather gods, such as the weather god of the lightning, the weather god of…

  • weatherboard (construction)

    Clapboard, type of board bevelled toward one edge, used to clad the exterior of a frame building. Clapboards are attached horizontally, each one overlapping the next one down. They are six to eight inches in width, diminishing from about a 58 inch thickness at the lower edge to a fine upper edge

  • Weatherby rifle (weapon)

    rifle: 257 Weatherby—the name of the inventor of the rifle and the cartridge—is considerably more powerful than weapons with larger bore diameters such as the .30-30, because the Weatherby bullet travels faster.

  • weatherfish (fish)

    Weatherfish, any of certain fishes of the loach (q.v.)

  • Weatherford (Texas, United States)

    Weatherford, city, seat of Parker county, north-central Texas, U.S. It lies some 30 miles (50 km) west of Fort Worth. It originated in 1855 as the county seat and was named for Jefferson Weatherford, a member of the Texas Senate. Indian raids hampered the growth of the city until the 1870s; in 1880

  • Weatherill, Jay (premier of South Australia)

    South Australia: Political characteristics: …as premier until 2011, when Jay Weatherill took over as party leader and premier. The Labor government made a big commitment to fostering the growth of renewable energy, and by 2014–15 it had already surpassed its 2020 target goal of providing 33 percent of energy production through renewable sources. The…

  • weathering (geology)

    Weathering, disintegration or alteration of rock in its natural or original position at or near the Earth’s surface through physical, chemical, and biological processes induced or modified by wind, water, and climate. During the weathering process the translocation of disintegrated or altered

  • weathering (glassware)

    industrial glass: Chemical properties: …extended humidity exposure (often called weathering). The relative “weatherabilities” of the major oxide glasses are indicated in the table of properties of oxide glasses. The weathering resistance of several commercial glasses is shown in Figure 6. In general, glasses that are low in alkali offer increased weathering resistance. Vitreous silica…

  • weathering steel (metallurgy)

    construction: Use of steel and other metals: …18 percent chromium) and so-called weathering steel, copper-bearing steel alloys that form an adherent oxide layer. The bronze curtain wall of Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building (1954–58) in New York City proved to be an isolated example. Probably of equal importance in curtain-wall construction was the development of cold-setting…

  • weathering-limited slope (geology)

    valley: Hillslopes: On weathering-limited slopes, transport processes are so efficient that debris is removed more quickly than it can be generated by further weathering. Such hillslopes develop a faceted or angular morphology in which an upper free face, or cliff, contributes debris to a lower slope of accumulation.…

  • Weatherman (American militant group)

    Weather Underground, militant group of young white Americans formed in 1969 that grew out of the anti-Vietnam War movement. The Weather Underground, originally known as Weatherman, evolved from the Third World Marxists, a faction within Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the major national

  • Weathermaster (air-conditioning system)

    construction: Heating and cooling systems: Carrier’s “Weathermaster” system was energy-intensive, appropriate to the declining energy costs of the time, and it was adopted for most of the all-glass skyscrapers that followed in the next 25 years. In the 1960s the so-called dual-duct system appeared; both warm and cold air were centrally…

  • Weathers, Carl (American actor and football player)

    Rocky: …heavyweight champion, Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers), who had planned a title defense in Philadelphia on the first day of the bicentennial year of 1976, learns that his scheduled opponent is unable to fight. Another top contender cannot be found, so Creed decides to give a local fighter a chance.…

  • weave draft (textile design)

    textile: Woven fabrics: …conveys a composer’s ideas, so weave drafts or point paper plans communicate a textile designer’s directions for constructing woven fabrics. The draft is a plan on graph paper showing at least one repeat or weave unit of the fabric to be woven. This information enables the weaver or mill specialist…

  • weaver (bird)

    Weaver, any of a number of small finchlike birds of the Old World, or any of several related birds that are noted for their nest-building techniques using grass stems and other plant fibres. They are particularly well-known for their roofed nests, which in some African species form complex, hanging

  • Weaver Navigation Canal (canal, England, United Kingdom)

    canals and inland waterways: Lock gates: On the Weaver Navigations Canal in England the hydraulic power for operating the lock gates has been derived for 100 years from the 10-foot head difference between the pounds.

  • weaver’s knot (knot)

    knot: The sheet bend, or weaver’s knot, is widely used by sailors for uniting two ropes of different sizes. The end of one rope is passed through a loop of the other, is passed around the loop, and under its own standing part. An ordinary fishnet is…

  • Weaver, Buck (American baseball player)

    Black Sox Scandal: …Charles (“Swede”) Risberg, third baseman George (“Buck”) Weaver, outfielders Joe (“Shoeless Joe”) Jackson and Oscar (“Happy”) Felsch, and utility infielder Fred McMullin. Court records suggest that the eight players received $70,000 to $100,000 for losing five games to three.

  • Weaver, Dennis (American actor)

    Dennis Weaver, American actor (born June 4, 1924, Joplin, Mo.—died Feb. 24, 2006, Ridgway, Colo.), first became famous for his portrayal from 1955 to 1964 of the limping deputy Chester Goode, Marshal Matt Dillon’s sidekick, in the long-running television series Gunsmoke, for which he won an Emmy A

  • Weaver, Earl (American baseball player and manager)

    Earl Weaver, American professional baseball player and manager whose career managerial record of 1,480 wins and 1,060 losses is one of the best in major league history. Weaver managed the Baltimore Orioles for 17 seasons (1968–82; 1985–86), leading them to four American League (AL) titles—three in

  • Weaver, Earl Sidney (American baseball player and manager)

    Earl Weaver, American professional baseball player and manager whose career managerial record of 1,480 wins and 1,060 losses is one of the best in major league history. Weaver managed the Baltimore Orioles for 17 seasons (1968–82; 1985–86), leading them to four American League (AL) titles—three in

  • Weaver, George (American baseball player)

    Black Sox Scandal: …Charles (“Swede”) Risberg, third baseman George (“Buck”) Weaver, outfielders Joe (“Shoeless Joe”) Jackson and Oscar (“Happy”) Felsch, and utility infielder Fred McMullin. Court records suggest that the eight players received $70,000 to $100,000 for losing five games to three.

  • Weaver, Harriet Shaw (benefactor)

    James Joyce: Early travels and works: …a series of grants from Harriet Shaw Weaver, editor of the Egoist magazine, which by 1930 had amounted to more than £23,000. Her generosity resulted partly from her admiration for his work and partly from her sympathy with his difficulties, for, as well as poverty, he had to contend with…

  • Weaver, James B. (American politician)

    James B. Weaver, American politician who leaned toward agrarian radicalism; he twice ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. presidency, as the Greenback-Labor candidate (1880) and as the Populist candidate (1892). Admitted to the bar in 1856, Weaver practiced law in Bloomfield, Iowa, and entered politics,

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