<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Weigel, Helene (Austrian actress and stage director)

    Helene Weigel, Austrian actress and stage director who, with her husband, Bertolt Brecht, in 1949 established the Berliner Ensemble theatre group in what was then East Berlin. Weigel was born into an assimilated Jewish family during the last decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. With the model of

  • Weigela (plant genus)

    Weigela, genus with about 10 species of East Asian flowering shrubs belonging to the family Diervillaceae, some widely grown as ornamentals for their spring and summer flowers. The tubular, white to red blossoms are borne on upright shrubs to 4 metres (13 feet) tall. Most species of Weigela are

  • Weigelia (plant genus)

    Weigela, genus with about 10 species of East Asian flowering shrubs belonging to the family Diervillaceae, some widely grown as ornamentals for their spring and summer flowers. The tubular, white to red blossoms are borne on upright shrubs to 4 metres (13 feet) tall. Most species of Weigela are

  • weight (physics)

    Weight, gravitational force of attraction on an object, caused by the presence of a massive second object, such as the Earth or Moon. Weight is a consequence of the universal law of gravitation: any two objects, because of their masses, attract each other with a force that is directly proportional

  • weight lifting (sport)

    Weightlifting, sport in which barbells are lifted competitively or as an exercise. For other activities using weights but distinct from weightlifting, see weight training, bodybuilding, and powerlifting. Weightlifting has a lengthy history. For many prehistoric tribes, the traditional test of

  • Weight of Oranges, The (poetry by Michaels)

    Anne Michaels: Early life and poetry: Her first collection, The Weight of Oranges, won the 1986 Commonwealth Prize for the Americas. The Weight of Oranges combines an exploration of the sensual body and its experience of the natural world with the nature of memory and of a past that is haunted by the Holocaust.…

  • weight throw (sport)

    Weight throw, sport of throwing a weight for distance or height. Men have long matched strength and skill at hurling objects. The roth cleas, or wheel feat, reputedly was a major test of the ancient Tailteann Games in Ireland. The competition consisted of various methods of throwing: from shoulder

  • weight training

    Weight training, system of physical conditioning using free weights (barbells and dumbbells) and weight machines (e.g., Nautilus-type equipment). It is a training system rather than a competitive sport such as Olympic weightlifting or powerlifting. There is evidence of weight training even in

  • Weight Watchers International, Inc. (American company)

    Heinz: …1978 the Heinz Company acquired Weight Watchers International, Inc., a producer of low-calorie meals whose weight-loss program eventually became the largest of its kind in the United States. Soon afterward the company began a period of global expansion that continued through the early 21st century. Heinz acquired food-processing companies and…

  • weight, body (physiology)

    anorexia nervosa: …individual to maintain a normal body weight. A person with anorexia nervosa typically weighs no more than 85 percent of the expected weight for the person’s age, height, and sex, and in some cases much less. In addition, people with anorexia nervosa have a distorted evaluation of their own weight…

  • weight-based method (baking)

    baking: Dividing: In the weight-based method, a cylindrical rope of dough is continuously extruded through an orifice at a fixed rate and is cut off by a knife-edged rotor at fixed intervals. Since the dough is of consistent density, the cut pieces are of uniform weight. Like the pocket-cut…

  • weighted arithmetic mean (mathematics)

    mean: …a more general average, the weighted arithmetic mean. If each number (x) is assigned a corresponding positive weight (w), the weighted arithmetic mean is defined as the sum of their products (wx) divided by the sum of their weights. In this case,

  • weighting (textile)

    filling: …filling is a sizing, or weighting, substance added to yarn or fabric to fill in open spaces or increase weight.

  • weightlessness (physics)

    Weightlessness, condition experienced while in free-fall, in which the effect of gravity is canceled by the inertial (e.g., centrifugal) force resulting from orbital flight. The term zero gravity is often used to describe such a condition. Excluding spaceflight, true weightlessness can be

  • weightlifting (sport)

    Weightlifting, sport in which barbells are lifted competitively or as an exercise. For other activities using weights but distinct from weightlifting, see weight training, bodybuilding, and powerlifting. Weightlifting has a lengthy history. For many prehistoric tribes, the traditional test of

  • weights and measures

    Weights and measures, the standard or agreed upon units for expressing the amount of some quantity, such as capacity, volume, length, area, number, and weight. See measurement

  • Weights and Measures Act (United Kingdom [1824])

    measurement system: The English system: The Weights and Measures Act of 1824 sought to clear away some of the medieval tangle. A single gallon was decreed, defined as the volume occupied by

  • Weights and Measures, General Conference on (international organization)

    International System of Units: Adopted by the 11th General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) in 1960, it is abbreviated SI in all languages.

  • Weigl, Helene (Austrian actress and stage director)

    Helene Weigel, Austrian actress and stage director who, with her husband, Bertolt Brecht, in 1949 established the Berliner Ensemble theatre group in what was then East Berlin. Weigel was born into an assimilated Jewish family during the last decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. With the model of

  • Weihai (China)

    Weihai, port city, eastern Shandong sheng (province), eastern China. It lies on the north coast of the Shandong Peninsula. Until the 14th century Weihai was no more than a minor fishing village, but in 1398, as part of the coastal defense policy against the raids of Japanese pirates, it became a

  • Weihaiwei (China)

    Weihai, port city, eastern Shandong sheng (province), eastern China. It lies on the north coast of the Shandong Peninsula. Until the 14th century Weihai was no more than a minor fishing village, but in 1398, as part of the coastal defense policy against the raids of Japanese pirates, it became a

  • Weihenmayer, Erik (American mountaineer)

    Mount Everest: Extraordinary feats: …the first blind person, American Erik Weihenmayer, summited Everest; he was an experienced climber who had already scaled peaks such as Denali (Mount McKinley) in Alaska and Kilimanjaro in eastern Africa before his climb of Everest.

  • Weihnachtsfeier, Die (work by Schleiermacher)

    Friedrich Schleiermacher: Halle and Berlin: In Die Weihnachtsfeier (1805; Christmas Celebration), written in the style of a Platonic dialogue, Schleiermacher adopted the definition of religion he later incorporated into Der christliche Glaube. Instead of speaking of religion as “feeling and intuition,” he now called it simply “feeling”—namely, the immediate feeling that God lives and…

  • Weil’s disease (pathology)

    Leptospirosis, acute systemic illness of animals, occasionally communicable to humans, that is characterized by extensive inflammation of the blood vessels. It is caused by a spirochete, or spiral-shaped bacterium, of the genus Leptospira. Leptospires infect most mammals, particularly rodents and

  • Weil, André (French mathematician)

    André Weil, French mathematician who was one of the most influential figures in mathematics during the 20th century, particularly in number theory and algebraic geometry. André was the brother of the philosopher and mystic Simone Weil. He studied at the école Normale Supérieure (now part of the

  • Weil, Andrew (American physician)

    Andrew Weil, American physician and popularizer of alternative and integrative medicine. Weil was the only child of parents who owned a millinery supply store. As a child, he developed a strong interest in plants, which he said he inherited from his mother and grandmother. After graduating from

  • Weil, Andrew Thomas (American physician)

    Andrew Weil, American physician and popularizer of alternative and integrative medicine. Weil was the only child of parents who owned a millinery supply store. As a child, he developed a strong interest in plants, which he said he inherited from his mother and grandmother. After graduating from

  • Weil, Cynthia (American songwriter)

    The Brill Building: Assembly-Line Pop: …Carole King, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, and Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman were to rock and roll what Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart and George and Ira Gershwin were to Tin Pan Alley. The difference was that the writers of Brill Building pop understood…

  • Weil, Kurt (German-American composer)

    Kurt Weill, German-born American composer who created a revolutionary kind of opera of sharp social satire in collaboration with the writer Bertolt Brecht. Weill studied privately with Albert Bing and at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Berlin with Engelbert Humperdinck. He gained some

  • Weil, Mark (Uzbek theatre producer and director)

    Mark Weil, (Mark Yakovlevich Weil), Uzbek theatre producer and director (born Jan. 25, 1952, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, U.S.S.R.—died Sept. 7, 2007, Tashkent, Uzbekistan), founded (1976) and ran the Ilkhom Theatre, the first independent theatre in the Soviet Union. Weil studied drama in Moscow and at

  • Weil, Mark Yakovlevich (Uzbek theatre producer and director)

    Mark Weil, (Mark Yakovlevich Weil), Uzbek theatre producer and director (born Jan. 25, 1952, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, U.S.S.R.—died Sept. 7, 2007, Tashkent, Uzbekistan), founded (1976) and ran the Ilkhom Theatre, the first independent theatre in the Soviet Union. Weil studied drama in Moscow and at

  • Weil, Simone (French philosopher)

    Simone Weil, French mystic, social philosopher, and activist in the French Resistance during World War II, whose posthumously published works had particular influence on French and English social thought. Intellectually precocious, Weil also expressed social awareness at an early age. At five she

  • Weill, Kurt (German-American composer)

    Kurt Weill, German-born American composer who created a revolutionary kind of opera of sharp social satire in collaboration with the writer Bertolt Brecht. Weill studied privately with Albert Bing and at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Berlin with Engelbert Humperdinck. He gained some

  • Weill, Kurt Julian (German-American composer)

    Kurt Weill, German-born American composer who created a revolutionary kind of opera of sharp social satire in collaboration with the writer Bertolt Brecht. Weill studied privately with Albert Bing and at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Berlin with Engelbert Humperdinck. He gained some

  • Weill, Sandy (American financier and philanthropist)

    Sanford I. Weill, American financier and philanthropist whose company, Travelers Group, merged with Citicorp to form Citigroup in 1998—the largest merger in history at the time. Weill was born to Polish immigrants and was the first in his family to earn a college degree, graduating from Cornell

  • Weill, Sanford I. (American financier and philanthropist)

    Sanford I. Weill, American financier and philanthropist whose company, Travelers Group, merged with Citicorp to form Citigroup in 1998—the largest merger in history at the time. Weill was born to Polish immigrants and was the first in his family to earn a college degree, graduating from Cornell

  • Weimar (Germany)

    Weimar, city, ThuringiaLand (state), eastern Germany. Weimar lies along the Ilm River, just east of Erfurt. First mentioned in documents in 975 as Wimare, it was declared a town in 1254 and was chartered in 1348. Ruled by the counts of Weimar-Orlamünde from 1247 to 1372, it then passed to the Saxon

  • Weimar Classicism (German literature)

    German literature: Weimar Classicism: Goethe and Schiller: It took Goethe more than 10 years to adapt himself to life at the court. After a two-year sojourn in Italy from 1786 to 1788, he published his first Neoclassical work, the drama Iphigenie auf Tauris (1779–87; Iphigenie in Tauris),…

  • Weimar coalition (German history)

    Friedrich Ebert: …Democrats had formed the so-called Black–Red–Gold (Weimar) coalition, named after the colours of the flag of the liberal revolution of 1848.

  • Weimar Constitution (German history)

    Weimar Republic: The Weimar constitution: The national assembly met in Weimar on February 6, 1919. Ebert’s opening speech underlined the breach with the past and urged the Allies not to cripple the young republic by the demands imposed on it. On February 11 the assembly elected Ebert president of…

  • Weimar Renaissance (German history)

    Germany: The Weimar Renaissance: Amid the political and economic turmoil of the early 1920s, Germany’s cultural and intellectual life was flowering. The so-called Weimar Renaissance brought the fulfillment of the Modernist revolution, which in the late 19th century had begun to transform the European aesthetic sensibility. The…

  • Weimar Republic (German history [1918–1933])

    Weimar Republic, the government of Germany from 1919 to 1933, so called because the assembly that adopted its constitution met at Weimar from February 6 to August 11, 1919. The abdication of Emperor William II on November 9, 1918, marked the end of the German Empire. That day Maximilian, prince of

  • Weimaraner (breed of dog)

    Weimaraner, sporting dog breed developed in the early 19th century by German nobles of the court of Weimar. First used to hunt big game, the dog was later trained as a bird dog and retriever. The Weimaraner is a graceful dog with hanging ears, blue, gray, or amber eyes, and a distinctive short,

  • Weimorts, Albert Lee, Jr. (American civilian engineer)

    Albert Lee Weimorts, Jr., American civilian engineer (born March 6, 1938, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.—died Dec. 21, 2005, Fort Walton Beach, Fla.), earned the nickname “father of the mother of all bombs” for his work in developing the 9,840-kg (21,700-lb) Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) bomb. The M

  • Wein, George (American music promoter)

    Newport Folk Festival: Founded by music producer George Wein, his business partner Albert Grossman, and several singer-songwriters, the Newport Folk Festival, first staged in 1959, had the aim of showcasing the diversity of American folk music, from rural traditions to urban popular styles. The bill of the inaugural event included professional folk…

  • Wein, Len (American comic book writer and editor)

    Wolverine: …for Marvel Comics by writer Len Wein and artist John Romita, Sr. Wolverine—who possesses razor-sharp claws, the ability to rapidly heal virtually any injury, and a skeleton reinforced with an indestructible metal—made his first full appearance in The Incredible Hulk no. 181 (1974).

  • Weinberg, Alvin (American physicist)

    Big Science: …Oak Ridge National Laboratory director Alvin Weinberg. The article described Big Science as part of the new political economy of science produced by World War II, during which the U.S. government sponsored gigantic research efforts such as the Manhattan Project, the American atomic bomb program, and the Radiation Laboratory, a…

  • Weinberg, George (American clinical psychologist)

    George Weinberg, American psychotherapist who coined the term homophobia to describe the extreme aversion to being in the presence of gay men or women that he observed among some of his colleagues. Weinberg earned (1951) a master’s degree in English from New York University. He studied mathematics

  • Weinberg, George Henry (American clinical psychologist)

    George Weinberg, American psychotherapist who coined the term homophobia to describe the extreme aversion to being in the presence of gay men or women that he observed among some of his colleagues. Weinberg earned (1951) a master’s degree in English from New York University. He studied mathematics

  • Weinberg, Linda (American art historian)

    Linda Nochlin, American feminist art historian whose 1971 article “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” led to new research into forgotten and underappreciated women artists throughout history and, more broadly, raised consciousness among scholars regarding the way history is analyzed and

  • Weinberg, Max (American musician)

    Conan O'Brien: …a hip band, led by Max Weinberg (drummer for Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band), playing in the background—but O’Brien was as irreverent and silly as Letterman. His material was aimed squarely at the 18- to 34-year-old market, mixing in such recurring comedy bits as “Audience Hygiene,” “Classic Films Dubbed by…

  • Weinberg, Melvin (American criminal)

    Abscam: …1978, when the FBI enlisted Melvin Weinberg, a con artist who had previously worked as a bureau informant, to aid in the recovery of stolen paintings. Weinberg, who was facing a three-year prison term after having been convicted of running a fraudulent real-estate scheme, saw his sentence reduced to probation…

  • Weinberg, Steven (American physicist)

    Steven Weinberg, American nuclear physicist who in 1979 shared the Nobel Prize for Physics with Sheldon Lee Glashow and Abdus Salam for work in formulating the electroweak theory, which explains the unity of electromagnetism with the weak nuclear force. Weinberg and Glashow were members of the same

  • Weinberg, Wilhelm (German physician)

    G.H. Hardy: …concurrently with the German physician Wilhelm Weinberg, what is now known as the Hardy-Weinberg law. The law resolved the controversy over what proportions of dominant and recessive genetic traits would be propagated in a large mixed population. Although Hardy attached little importance to the law, it became central to the…

  • Weinberg-Salam theory (physics)

    Electroweak theory, in physics, the theory that describes both the electromagnetic force and the weak force. Superficially, these forces appear quite different. The weak force acts only across distances smaller than the atomic nucleus, while the electromagnetic force can extend for great distances

  • Weinberger, Caspar Willard (United States government official)

    Caspar Willard Weinberger, American government official (born Aug. 18, 1917, San Francisco, Calif., U.S.—died March 28, 2006, Bangor, Maine), was secretary of defense (1981–87) under Pres. Ronald Reagan and presided over the biggest peacetime increase in military spending in U.S. history.

  • Weinberger, Jaromir (Czech composer)

    Jaromir Weinberger, Czech composer known mainly for his opera ?vanda Dudák (Shvanda the Bagpiper). Weinberger studied at the Prague Conservatory and with Max Reger in Leipzig, later working with the Slovak National Theatre. In 1939 he settled in the United States. His opera ?vanda Dudák, first

  • Weinbrenner, Friedrich (German architect)

    Karlsruhe: Friedrich Weinbrenner gave it its essential character by erecting many buildings in Neoclassical style, including the town hall and the Evangelical and Roman Catholic churches. The city sustained severe damage in World War II, but many noteworthy buildings have been restored.

  • Weiner, A. S. (biologist)

    Rh blood group system: …1940 by Karl Landsteiner and A.S. Weiner. Since that time a number of distinct Rh antigens have been identified, but the first and most common one, called RhD, causes the most severe immune reaction and is the primary determinant of the Rh trait.

  • Weiner, Lawrence (American artist)

    Lawrence Weiner, American conceptual artist best known for his text-based installations and radical definitions of art. He is considered a central figure in the foundation of the conceptual art movement of the 1960s. Weiner grew up in the South Bronx and attended New York public schools. He dropped

  • Weiner, Lee (American activist)

    Chicago Seven: …(MOBE); and John Froines and Lee Weiner, who were alleged to have made stink bombs—were tried on charges of criminal conspiracy and incitement to riot.

  • Weiner, Leó (Hungarian composer)

    Leó Weiner, composer in the tradition of Brahms and Mendelssohn. He was a coach at the Budapest Comic Opera and won the Franz Josef Jubilee Prize, a travelling fellowship that took him to Vienna, Berlin, Leipzig, and Paris. From 1908 to 1949 he was a professor at the Budapest Academy. As a composer

  • Weiner, Matthew (American writer and producer)

    Matthew Weiner, American writer and producer who was the creator, a cowriter, and an executive producer of the television series Mad Men (2007–15). Weiner moved to Los Angeles with his family at age nine. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1987 and received a master’s degree from the

  • Weingartner, Felix (Austrian conductor and composer)

    Felix Weingartner, edler von Munzberg, Austrian symphonic and operatic conductor and composer, best-known for his interpretations of the works of Ludwig van Beethoven and Richard Wagner. Weingartner first studied composition at Graz. Beginning as a student of philosophy at the University of

  • Weingartner, Paul Felix, edler von Munzberg (Austrian conductor and composer)

    Felix Weingartner, edler von Munzberg, Austrian symphonic and operatic conductor and composer, best-known for his interpretations of the works of Ludwig van Beethoven and Richard Wagner. Weingartner first studied composition at Graz. Beginning as a student of philosophy at the University of

  • Weinglass, Leonard Irving (American attorney)

    Leonard Irving Weinglass, American attorney (born Aug. 27, 1933, Belleville, N.J.—died March 23, 2011, Bronx, N.Y.), championed antiwar and civil rights activists and those with radical or controversial political viewpoints during the 1960s and ’70s. Weinglass received a law degree from Yale Law

  • Weinheber, Josef (Austrian poet)

    Josef Weinheber, Austrian poet noted for his technical mastery. Weinheber’s parents died when he was a child, and he spent six unhappy years in an orphanage before an aunt took him to live with her. For many years he worked in the postal service. Weinheber’s early books, Von beiden Ufern (1923;

  • Weininger, Otto (Austrian philosopher)

    Otto Weininger, Austrian philosopher whose single work, Geschlecht und Charakter (1903; Sex and Character), served as a sourcebook for anti-Semitic propagandists. The son of a prosperous Jewish artisan, Weininger became a Christian the day he received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Vienna

  • Weinstein Company (American company)

    Harvey Weinstein: …Miramax Films to form the Weinstein Company. The company’s early notable releases included Grindhouse (2007), which consisted of two feature-length films directed by Robert Rodriguez (Planet Terror) and Tarantino (Death Proof); I’m Not There (2007), an unconventional biopic of Bob Dylan; and The Great Debaters (2007), a drama—directed by and…

  • Weinstein, Bob (American executive)

    Harvey Weinstein: …film producer who—with his brother, Bob—was cofounder and cochairman of Miramax Films (1979–2005) and later the Weinstein Company (2005–17). Once a powerful figure in Hollywood, his career was halted amid numerous allegations of sexual harassment and assault.

  • Weinstein, Donald (American historian)

    Donald Weinstein, American historian (born March 13, 1926, Rochester, N.Y.—died Dec. 13, 2015, Tucson, Ariz.), was a noted expert on the Italian Renaissance who demonstrated in his landmark work, Savonarola and Florence: Prophecy and Patriotism in the Renaissance (1970), that the nature of politics

  • Weinstein, Garri (Soviet-born chess player)

    Garry Kasparov, Soviet-born chess master who became the world chess champion in 1985. Kasparov was the youngest world chess champion (at 22 years of age) and the first world chess champion to be defeated by a supercomputer in a competitive match. Kasparov was born to a Jewish father and an Armenian

  • Weinstein, Harry (Soviet-born chess player)

    Garry Kasparov, Soviet-born chess master who became the world chess champion in 1985. Kasparov was the youngest world chess champion (at 22 years of age) and the first world chess champion to be defeated by a supercomputer in a competitive match. Kasparov was born to a Jewish father and an Armenian

  • Weinstein, Harvey (American film producer)

    Harvey Weinstein, American film producer who—with his brother, Bob—was cofounder and cochairman of Miramax Films (1979–2005) and later the Weinstein Company (2005–17). Once a powerful figure in Hollywood, his career was halted amid numerous allegations of sexual harassment and assault. Weinstein

  • Weinstein, Jack (American actor)

    Jack Weston, (JACK WEINSTEIN), U.S. stage, motion picture, and television actor who for four decades proved adept at portraying characters that ranged from menacing, in Wait Until Dark, to comic, in The Ritz and The Four Seasons (b. Aug. 21, 1924?--d. May 3,

  • Weinstein, Louis (American physician)

    Louis Weinstein, American physician (born Feb. 26, 1908, Bridgeport, Conn.—died March 16, 2000, Newton, Mass.), pioneered treatments for infectious diseases and was a prominent medical educator. He earned his medical degree in 1943 from Boston University and served as the university’s chief of i

  • Weinstein, Nathan (American novelist)

    Nathanael West, American writer best known for satiric novels of the 1930s. Of middle-class Jewish immigrant parentage, he attended high school in New York City and graduated from Brown University in 1924. During a 15-month stay in Paris, he completed his first novel, The Dream Life of Balso Snell,

  • Weinstock of Bowden, Arnold Weinstock, Baron (British industrialist)

    Arnold Weinstock, Baron Weinstock of Bowden, British industrialist (born July 29, 1924, London, Eng.—died July 23, 2002, Bowden Hill, Wiltshire, Eng.), led the U.K.’s General Electric Co. (GEC) as managing director for more than three decades (1963–96); his stern management and conservative t

  • Weintraub, Aaron Roy (American author)

    Harold Brodkey, American novelist and short-story writer whose near-autobiographical fiction avoids plot, instead concentrating upon careful, close description of feeling. Brodkey attended Harvard University (B.A., 1952) and soon began publishing short stories in literary magazines. His first

  • Weintraub, Al (American businessman)

    Bell Sound: Al Weintraub opened Bell Sound in the early 1950s on West 87th Street, and when he moved closer to the midtown action (to 46th Street and 8th Avenue) in 1954, Bell became New York City’s busiest independent studio. Recording sessions in the city were closely…

  • Weintraub, Jerome Charles (American impresario)

    Jerry Weintraub, (Jerome Charles Weintraub), American impresario (born Sept. 26, 1937, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died July 6, 2015, Santa Barbara, Calif.), forged an extraordinarily successful show-business career as a concert promoter, talent manager, and film and TV producer on the strength of his colourful

  • Weintraub, Jerry (American impresario)

    Jerry Weintraub, (Jerome Charles Weintraub), American impresario (born Sept. 26, 1937, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died July 6, 2015, Santa Barbara, Calif.), forged an extraordinarily successful show-business career as a concert promoter, talent manager, and film and TV producer on the strength of his colourful

  • Weinzweig, John Jacob (Canadian composer)

    John Jacob Weinzweig, Canadian composer (born March 11, 1913, Toronto, Ont.—died Aug. 24, 2006, Toronto), introduced modernist elements to Canadian music and through his teaching influenced younger composers. A tireless promoter of his country’s music, he became known as the “dean of Canadian c

  • Weipa (Queensland, Australia)

    Weipa, Aboriginal community and mining town, northern Queensland, Australia, on the northwestern coast of Cape York Peninsula. It lies on Albatross Bay at the estuaries of the Hey, Embley, and Mission rivers, facing the Gulf of Carpentaria. In 1802 the explorer Matthew Flinders noted the red cliffs

  • weiqi (game)

    Go, board game for two players. Of East Asian origin, it is popular in China, Korea, and especially Japan, the country with which it is most closely identified. Go, probably the world’s oldest board game, is thought to have originated in China some 4,000 years ago. According to some sources, this

  • weir (engineering)

    Weir, any control or barrier placed in an open channel to permit measurement of water discharge. The latter may be computed from a formula expressing the discharge in terms of crest length of the weir, depth of flow above the weir, weir geometry, and other factors. A variety of weirs have been

  • weir (fishing)

    commercial fishing: Traps: …the big wooden corrals, or weirs, and the large pound nets. The oldest type may be the Italian tonnara, used in the Mediterranean for tuna from the Bosporus to the Atlantic. Very large pound nets are also used by the Japanese on the Pacific coast, by the Danes and their…

  • Weir of Hermiston (novel by Stevenson)

    Weir of Hermiston, fragment of an uncompleted novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, published posthumously in 1896. Stevenson used the novel in part as an effort to understand his youthful quarrel with his own father. Rich in psychological characterizations, with masterful dialogue and a beautiful prose

  • Weir of Hermiston: An Unfinished Romance (novel by Stevenson)

    Weir of Hermiston, fragment of an uncompleted novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, published posthumously in 1896. Stevenson used the novel in part as an effort to understand his youthful quarrel with his own father. Rich in psychological characterizations, with masterful dialogue and a beautiful prose

  • Weir, Bob (American musician)

    John Perry Barlow: …where he became friends with Bob Weir, future guitarist for the Grateful Dead. He then studied at Wesleyan University, graduating with a degree in comparative religion in 1969. In 1971 Barlow began writing lyrics for the Grateful Dead, and with Weir he later penned such songs as “Cassidy” and “Mexicali…

  • Weir, Ernest T. (American industrialist)

    National Intergroup, Inc.: …was formed in 1929 by Ernest T. Weir (1875–1957) through an amalgamation of Weirton Steel Company, Great Lakes Steel Corporation, and Hanna Iron Ore Company; the company controlled not only steel mills but also iron-ore mines and coalfields. National Steel was consistently one of the most profitable steel companies throughout…

  • Weir, J. Alden (American artist)

    the Ten: John Henry Twachtman, J. Alden Weir, Thomas W. Dewing, Joseph De Camp, Frank W. Benson, Willard Leroy Metcalf, Edmund Tarbell, Robert Reid, and E.E. Simmons. When Twachtman died in 1902, William Merritt Chase replaced him.

  • Weir, Johnny (American figure skater)

    Hanyu Yuzuru: …himself after Plushchenko and American Johnny Weir, eventually mastered such difficult elements as the Biellmann spin (he was one of the relatively few male skaters who performed the move) and the quadruple jump. At the end of 2009, Hanyu won the gold medal at the Junior Grand Prix final in…

  • Weir, Judith (Scottish composer)

    opera: United Kingdom: …Scottish, are Thea Musgrave and Judith Weir. Both wrote several notable semioperatic works as well as full-length operas. The latter include, by Musgrave, Mary, Queen of Scots (1977; libretto by herself, after a play by Amalia Elguera) and A Christmas Carol (1979; libretto by herself, after the book by Charles…

  • Weir, Peter (Australian director)

    Peter Weir, Australian film director and screenwriter known for intelligent emotional dramas that frequently explore the relationship between characters and their social environment. He contributed to a renaissance in Australian filmmaking and directed a string of acclaimed Hollywood movies. Weir

  • Weir, Peter Lindsay (Australian director)

    Peter Weir, Australian film director and screenwriter known for intelligent emotional dramas that frequently explore the relationship between characters and their social environment. He contributed to a renaissance in Australian filmmaking and directed a string of acclaimed Hollywood movies. Weir

  • Weir, Robert Stanley (Canadian politician)

    O Canada: …were written in 1908 by Robert Stanley Weir (1856–1926), a lawyer and recorder of Montreal.

  • Weir, Tony (British scholar)

    tort: Protection of honour, reputation, and privacy: …according to English legal scholar Tony Weir’s A Casebook on Tort (1974), it may well be that its defects arise

  • Weird Science (film by Hughes [1985])

    Bill Paxton: …older brother in John Hughes’s Weird Science (1985) and as a vampire in Kathryn Bigelow’s Near Dark (1987).

  • Weird Sisters (fictional characters)

    Weird Sisters, the creatures who prophesy the destinies of the main characters in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The term Weird Sisters was first used by Scots writers as a sobriquet for the Fates of Greek and Roman mythology. Through its appearance in Raphael Holinshed’s Chronicles, the expression passed

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看