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  • Wesley, Samuel Sebastian (English composer)

    Samuel Sebastian Wesley, composer and organist, one of the most distinguished English church musicians of his time. The natural son of Samuel Wesley, he was a chorister of the Chapel Royal and held posts in London and at Exeter cathedral, Leeds Parish Church, Winchester cathedral, and Gloucester

  • Wesleyan Church (American Protestantism)

    Wesleyan Church, U.S. Protestant church, organized in 1968 by the merger of the Wesleyan Methodist Church of America and the Pilgrim Holiness Church. The Wesleyan Methodist Church originated in 1843 after members of the Methodist Episcopal Church withdrew from that church to organize a

  • Wesleyan Methodist Church (British Methodism)

    Methodism: Origins: After the schism, English Methodism, with vigorous outposts in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, rapidly developed as a church, even though it was reluctant to perpetuate the split from the Church of England. Its system centred in the Annual Conference (at first of ministers only, later thrown open to…

  • Wesleyan Methodist Church of America

    Holiness movement: …Episcopal Church to found the Wesleyan Methodist Church of America, establishing a pattern of defections or looser ties. Sizable numbers of Protestants from the rural areas of the Midwest and South were joining the Holiness movement. These people had a penchant for strict codes of dress and behaviour. Most of…

  • Wesleyan University (university, Middletown, Connecticut, United States)

    Wesleyan University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Middletown, Connecticut, U.S. It comprises the College of Letters and the College of Social Studies and departments in the sciences, mathematics, humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Altogether it offers

  • Wess, Frank (American musician)

    Frank Wellington Wess, American jazz musician (born Jan. 4, 1922, Kansas City, Mo.—died Oct. 30, 2013, New York, N.Y.), played tenor saxophone with a smooth sound and lively lyricism but was most noted as a pioneer of modern jazz flute. After performing in U.S. Army bands during World War II, he

  • Wess, Frank Wellington (American musician)

    Frank Wellington Wess, American jazz musician (born Jan. 4, 1922, Kansas City, Mo.—died Oct. 30, 2013, New York, N.Y.), played tenor saxophone with a smooth sound and lively lyricism but was most noted as a pioneer of modern jazz flute. After performing in U.S. Army bands during World War II, he

  • Wessel Islands (islands, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Wessel Islands, chain of small islands extending 75 miles (120 km) northeast from the Napier Peninsula in northeastern Northern Territory, Australia, into the Arafura Sea. Named for a Dutch ship that explored the area in 1636, the islands form the western gate to the Gulf of Carpentaria at Cape

  • Wessel, Gerhard (German general)

    BND: …he was succeeded by General Gerhard Wessel, a noted specialist on Soviet affairs and organizations. The BND reported to the West German chancellor. Its divisions were concerned with subversion, counterintelligence, and foreign intelligence, and it was headquartered at Munich, West Germany. In addition to foreign intelligence the BND engaged in…

  • Wessel, Horst (German Nazi martyr)

    Horst Wessel, martyr of the German Nazi movement, celebrated in the song “Horst Wessel Lied,” adopted as an anthem by Nazi Germany. A student and low-life bohemian, Wessel joined the Nazi Party in 1926 and became a member of the SA (Storm Troopers). In 1930 political enemies, possibly Communists,

  • Wessel, Johan Herman (Danish author)

    Johan Herman Wessel, Norwegian-born Danish writer and wit, known for his epigrams and light verse and for a famous parody of neoclassical tragedy. From 1761 when he entered the University of Copenhagen until his death at 43, Wessel lived the bohemian life of a debt-ridden, perpetual student. He was

  • Wesselényi Conspiracy (Hungarian history)

    Wesselényi Conspiracy, (c. 1664–71), group of Hungarians, organized by Ferenc Wesselényi, that unsuccessfully plotted to overthrow the Habsburg dynasty in Hungary; its efforts resulted in the establishment of an absolutist, repressive regime in Hungary. When the Habsburg emperor Leopold I (reigned

  • Wesselényi, Ferenc (Hungarian palatine administrator)

    Wesselényi Conspiracy: …magnates, including the palatine administrator Ferenc Wesselényi; the bán (governor) of Croatia, Péter Zrínyi; the chief justice of Hungary, Ferenc Nádasdy; and Ferenc Rákóczi. They formed a conspiracy to free Hungary from Habsburg rule and secretly negotiated for assistance from France and Turkey.

  • Wesselman, Tom (American artist)

    Pop art: …fixtures, typewriters, and gigantic hamburgers; Tom Wesselman’s “Great American Nudes,” flat, direct paintings of faceless sex symbols; and George Segal’s constructed tableaux featuring life-sized plaster-cast figures placed in actual environments (e.g., lunch counters and buses) retrieved from junkyards.

  • Wessely, Naphtali Herz (Danish author)

    Judaism: In central Europe: …he joined with a poet, Naphtali Herz (Hartwig) Wessely (1725–1805), in translating the Torah into German, combining Hebrew characters with modern German phonetics in an effort to displace Yiddish, and wrote a modern biblical commentary in Hebrew, the Be?ur (“Commentary”). Within a generation, Mendelssohn’s Bible was to be found in…

  • Wessely, Paula (Austrian actress)

    Paula Wessely, Austrian actress (born Jan. 20, 1907, Vienna, Austria—died May 11, 2000, Vienna), reigned as Austria’s most distinguished and beloved stage and screen actress almost from her debut at the Vienna Volkstheater in 1924 until her retirement in 1987; although she was castigated for her a

  • Wessex (historical kingdom, United Kingdom)

    Wessex, one of the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England, whose ruling dynasty eventually became kings of the whole country. In its permanent nucleus, its land approximated that of the modern counties of Hampshire, Dorset, Wiltshire, and Somerset. At times its land extended north of the River Thames, and

  • Wessex (fictional English company)

    Thomas Hardy: Early life and works: …the Madding Crowd (1874), introduced Wessex for the first time and made Hardy famous by its agricultural settings and its distinctive blend of humorous, melodramatic, pastoral, and tragic elements. The book is a vigorous portrayal of the beautiful and impulsive Bathsheba Everdene and her marital choices among Sergeant Troy, the…

  • Wessex Poems (work by Hardy)

    Thomas Hardy: Poetry: …rated poetry above fiction, and Wessex Poems (1898), his first significant public appearance as a poet, included verse written during his years as a novelist as well as revised versions of poems dating from the 1860s. As a collection it was often perceived as miscellaneous and uneven—an impression reinforced by…

  • Wessex, Edward and Sophie, earl and countess (British nobility)

    Earl and Countess of Wessex Edward and Sophie, On June 19, 1999, Prince Edward, the youngest child of the U.K.’s Queen Elizabeth II, married Sophie Rhys-Jones, a public relations consultant. The couple insisted it was an informal, family occasion—and so it was, within the constraints imposed by a

  • Wessex, House of (British royal house)

    Wessex: …of Anglo-Saxon England, whose ruling dynasty eventually became kings of the whole country. In its permanent nucleus, its land approximated that of the modern counties of Hampshire, Dorset, Wiltshire, and Somerset. At times its land extended north of the River Thames, and it eventually expanded westward to cover Devon and…

  • Wessex, Prince Edward, earl of (British prince)

    Prince Edward, earl of Wessex, youngest child of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, duke of Edinburgh. Edward had three older siblings: Charles, Anne, and Andrew. He attended Gordonstoun School, a spartan boarding school in Scotland, and studied history at Jesus College, Cambridge. After

  • Wessex, Sophie, countess of (British royal)

    Sophie, countess of Wessex, British consort (1999– ) of Prince Edward, the youngest child of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, duke of Edinburgh. Rhys-Jones’s father ran an import-export business that sold automobile tires to Hungary, and her mother was a part-time secretary. After attending

  • Wessobrunn (Germany)

    Western sculpture: Central Europe: …the group of families from Wessobrunn in southern Bavaria that specialized in stucco work and produced a long series of masters, including Johann Georg übelherr and Joseph Anton Feuchtmayer, whose masterpieces are the Rococo figures at Birnau on Lake Constance. The sculptor Christian Wenzinger worked at Freiburg im Breisgau in…

  • Wesson, Daniel B. (American manufacturer)

    Smith &amp; Wesson: …by Horace Smith (1808–93) and Daniel B. Wesson (1825–1906) in Norwich, Connecticut, to make lever-action Volcanic repeating handguns firing caseless self-consuming bullets.

  • West Africa (region, Africa)

    Western Africa, region of the western African continent comprising the countries of Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cabo Verde, Chad, C?te d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo. Western Africa

  • West African chimpanzee (primate)

    chimpanzee: Taxonomy: …Europe; the West African, or masked, chimpanzee (P. troglodytes verus), known as the common chimpanzee in Great Britain; the East African, or long-haired, chimpanzee (P. troglodytes schweinfurthii); and the Nigerian-Cameroon chimpanzee (P. troglodytes ellioti, which was formerly classified as P. troglodytes vellerosus).

  • West African Conference (European history)

    Berlin West Africa Conference, a series of negotiations (Nov. 15, 1884–Feb. 26, 1885) at Berlin, in which the major European nations met to decide all questions connected with the Congo River basin in Central Africa. The conference, proposed by Portugal in pursuance of its special claim to control

  • West African Craton (geological region, Africa)

    Africa: The Precambrian: …stable areas, such as the West African craton (Taoudeni and Tindouf basins), the Congo craton, the Kalahari craton (Nama basin of Namibia), and the Tanzania craton (Bukoban beds). Tectonic and magmatic activity was concentrated in mobile belts surrounding the stable areas and took place throughout the late Proterozoic, during the…

  • West African Economic and Monetary Union (African organization)

    Burkina Faso: Finance: …States, an agency of the West African Economic and Monetary Union, which consists of eight countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, C?te d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and Togo) that were once French colonies in Africa. Branches of the central bank in Burkina Faso are located in Ouagadougou and Bobo Dioulasso. Among…

  • West African Frontier Force (British military group)

    Frederick Lugard: …was to become the famous West African Frontier Force. Lugard’s success in this difficult undertaking led to his appointment as high commissioner for Northern Nigeria.

  • West African green mamba (snake)

    mamba: …of Central Africa, and the West African green mamba (D. viridis) are all more timid than the black mamba and have not been reported to attack humans. Like the black mamba, they will flatten their necks into a narrow hood as a defensive posture. Green mambas prey upon birds, small…

  • West African manatee (mammal)

    manatee: Evolution and paleontology: The West African manatee is also similar to the ancestral forms and may have dispersed from South America to Africa via transoceanic currents. Amazonian manatees appear to be descendants of Miocene trichechids isolated in a closed interior basin of South America.

  • West African monsoon

    West African monsoon, a major wind system that affects West African regions between latitudes 9° and 20° N and is characterized by winds that blow southwesterly during warmer months and northeasterly during cooler months of the year. Although areas just outside of this region also experience wind

  • West African Shield (geological formation, Africa)

    Liberia: Drainage: Liberia forms part of the West African Shield, a rock formation 2.7 to 3.4 billion years old, composed of granite, schist, and gneiss. In Liberia the shield has been intensely folded and faulted and is interspersed with iron-bearing formations known as itabirites. Along the coast lie beds of sandstone, with…

  • West African sleeping sickness (pathology)

    eflornithine: …gambiense, which causes Gambian (or West African) sleeping sickness. It is not effective against T. brucei rhodesiense, which causes Rhodesian (or East African) sleeping sickness.

  • West African trypanosomiasis (pathology)

    eflornithine: …gambiense, which causes Gambian (or West African) sleeping sickness. It is not effective against T. brucei rhodesiense, which causes Rhodesian (or East African) sleeping sickness.

  • West Alligator River (river, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Alligator Rivers: …for nearly 100 miles; the West Alligator (50 miles [80 km]) generally parallels the course of the South Alligator. The region includes Kakadu National Park.

  • West Allis (Wisconsin, United States)

    West Allis, city, western suburb of Milwaukee, Milwaukee county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It is situated just south of Wauwatosa. Potawatomi and Menominee Indians were among the early inhabitants of the region. In 1835 settlers from New York arrived and began farming along Honey Creek, for

  • West Antarctic Ice Sheet (ice sheet, Antarctica)

    glacier: West Antarctica: The part of the main continent lying south of the Americas, between longitudes 45° W and 165° E, is characterized by irregular bedrock and ice-surface topography and numerous nunataks and deep troughs. Two large ice shelves occur in West Antarctica: the Filchner-Ronne Ice…

  • West Antarctica (region, Antarctica)

    Antarctica: Structural framework: …and Cenozoic mobile belt in West Antarctica—separated by the fault-block belt, or horst, of the Transantarctic Mountains. East and West Antarctica have come to be known respectively as the Gondwana and Andean provinces, indicating general affinities of each sector with other regions; that is, the east seems to have affinity…

  • West Aramaic (language)

    Aramaic language: West Aramaic dialects include Nabataean (formerly spoken in parts of Arabia), Palmyrene (spoken in Palmyra, which was northeast of Damascus), Palestinian-Christian, and Judeo-Aramaic. West Aramaic is still spoken in a small number of villages in Syria.

  • West Area Computing (American organization)

    Mary Jackson: …its West Area Computing unit—the West Computers, comprising African American female mathematicians—and Jackson’s supervisor was Dorothy Vaughan. The women provided data that were later essential to the early success of the U.S. space program. At the time, NACA was segregated, with black employees required to use separate bathrooms and dining…

  • West Asia (region, Asia)

    Asia: West Asia: West Asia includes the highlands of Anatolia, the Caucasus, and the Armenian and Iranian highlands.

  • West Atlantic languages (African language)

    Atlantic languages, branch of the Niger-Congo language family spoken primarily in Senegal, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. The approximately 45 Atlantic languages are spoken by about 30 million people. One language cluster, Fula (also called Fulani, Peul, Fulfulde, and

  • West Australian (racehorse)

    Triple Crown: In 1853 West Australian became Britain’s first Triple Crown winner. Other countries involved in Thoroughbred racing then followed suit with their own series of “Triple Crown” races, most notably the United States.

  • West Australian Current (ocean current)

    West Australian Current, relatively cold surface current of the southeast Indian Ocean, part of the general counterclockwise movement in the southern section of that ocean. As the South Indian Current (part of the West Wind Drift) approaches the west coast of Australia, it turns north to parallel

  • West Bank (region, Palestine)

    West Bank, area of the former British-mandated (1920–47) territory of Palestine west of the Jordan River, claimed from 1949 to 1988 as part of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan but occupied from 1967 by Israel. The territory, excluding East Jerusalem, is also known within Israel by its biblical

  • West Barney Peak (mountain, Queensland-New South Wales, Australia)

    McPherson Range: …to its highest point at West Barney Peak, 4,459 feet (1,359 m). In 1770 the British navigator Captain James Cook sighted the range from the coast; he named the peak he saw Mount Warning. In 1827 Captain Patrick Logan became the first European to explore the interior of the range,…

  • West Bend (Wisconsin, United States)

    West Bend, city, seat (1853) of Washington county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It lies on a bend in the Milwaukee River, about 35 miles (55 km) northwest of Milwaukee. Potawatomi and Menominee Indians were early inhabitants of the area. The city was founded in 1845 and became a stopping place on

  • West Bengal (state, India)

    West Bengal, state of India, located in the eastern part of the country. It is bounded to the north by the state of Sikkim and the country of Bhutan, to the northeast by the state of Assam, to the east by the country of Bangladesh, to the south by the Bay of Bengal, to the southwest by the state of

  • West Bengal Duars (region, India)

    West Bengal Duars, physiographic region in extreme northeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It is bounded by Sikkim state and Bhutan to the north, Assam state to the east, the continuation of West Bengal state to the south, and Nepal to the west. The West Bengal Duars were ceded to the

  • West Bengal Panchayat Act (Indian history [1956])

    West Bengal: Constitutional framework: Established under the West Bengal Panchayat Act of 1956, panchayats are entrusted with sanitary and conservation services and with the supervision of the village police and the development of cottage industries. A three-tiered panchayat system, comprising several thousand village-level panchayats, several hundred intermediate-level panchayats, and more than a…

  • West Berkshire (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    West Berkshire, unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Berkshire, southern England. The unitary authority, which occupies the southwestern third of the historic county, covers a large, mainly rural area centred on the town of Newbury, the administrative centre. West Berkshire extends

  • West Berlin

    Isolated by the Cold War and divided by the wall that shaped life in the city until its fall in 1989, Berlin turned in on itself for four decades, looking back to its louche but rich Weimar past and reveling in a cynical present of spies, government subsidies, and anarchic activism. Foreigners who

  • West Berlin (historical division, Berlin, Germany)

    West Berlin, the western half of the German city of Berlin (q.v.), which until the reunification of the German state in 1990 was treated as a city and Land (state) of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany), though it was not constitutionally part of that

  • West Berlin discothèque bombing (terrorist attack, West Berlin, Germany [1986])

    1986 West Berlin discotheque bombing, attack carried out on April 5, 1986, in West Berlin, in which Libyan agents detonated a bomb at the La Belle discotheque, a nightclub frequented by U.S. soldiers stationed in Germany during the Cold War. The bomb, packed with plastic explosives and shrapnel,

  • West Bridgewater (Massachusetts, United States)

    West Bridgewater, town (township), Plymouth county, eastern Massachusetts, approximately 25 miles (40 km) south of Boston. The area was deeded by Massasoit, a Wampanoag Indian chief and sachem (intertribal leader) of all Wampanoags, to six people in trust for 56 proprietors of Duxbury plantation

  • West Bridgford (England, United Kingdom)

    West Bridgford, town, Rushcliffe district, administrative and historic county of Nottinghamshire, England. The town now functions largely as a residential suburb of Nottingham, which lies just to the northwest. West Bridgford’s parish church was built in the 14th century. There is some modern light

  • West Bromwich (England, United Kingdom)

    West Bromwich, locality in the metropolitan borough of Sandwell, metropolitan county of West Midlands, historic county of Staffordshire, west-central England. It lies about 5 miles (8 km) northwest of the city of Birmingham. Though the town is of ancient origin, its appearance is modern and

  • West Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States)

    Arlington, town (township), Middlesex county, east-central Massachusetts, U.S. It is a northwestern suburb of Boston. Settled in 1635 as part of Cambridge, it was known as Menotomy (from an Algonquian word meaning “swift waters”) until separately incorporated as West Cambridge in 1807. It was

  • West Caroline Trench (submarine trench, Pacific Ocean)

    Yap Trench, deep submarine trench in the western Pacific Ocean located east of the Yap Ridge and the Yap island group. The Yap Trench is about 400 miles (650 km) long from north to south and reaches a maximum depth of 27,976 feet (8,527 m) some 300 miles (480 km) northeast of the Palau Islands. It

  • West Chester (Pennsylvania, United States)

    West Chester, borough (town), seat (1786) of Chester county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies 27 miles (43 km) west of Philadelphia. Settlement began in the early 1700s, and Turk’s Head Inn was established there in 1761; but the town’s growth was delayed by a prolonged dispute with Chester

  • West Chester Academy (university, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States)

    West Chester University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the College of Arts and Sciences and schools of Education, Health Sciences,

  • West Chester Normal School (university, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States)

    West Chester University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the College of Arts and Sciences and schools of Education, Health Sciences,

  • West Chester State College (university, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States)

    West Chester University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the College of Arts and Sciences and schools of Education, Health Sciences,

  • West Chester University of Pennsylvania (university, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States)

    West Chester University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the College of Arts and Sciences and schools of Education, Health Sciences,

  • West Coast (regional council, New Zealand)

    West Coast, regional council in west-central South Island, New Zealand. It is bounded by the Tasman Sea (west), the unitary authority of Tasman (north), and the regional councils of Canterbury and Otago (east) and Southland (south). The Southern Alps, with their towering peaks and rugged terrain,

  • West Coast jazz (music)

    Dave Brubeck: …epitomized that of the “West Coast movement.”

  • West Coast offense (football)

    Bill Walsh: His “West Coast offense” was a ball-control offense that featured short passes and quick slanting pass routes by receivers and running backs. This resulted in coverage mismatches and space for the backs and receivers to break long runs. Walsh was inducted into the Pro Football Hall…

  • West Computers (American organization)

    Mary Jackson: …its West Area Computing unit—the West Computers, comprising African American female mathematicians—and Jackson’s supervisor was Dorothy Vaughan. The women provided data that were later essential to the early success of the U.S. space program. At the time, NACA was segregated, with black employees required to use separate bathrooms and dining…

  • West Country wrestling (sport)

    Cornish wrestling, style of wrestling developed and still practiced in southwestern England. It is also known as the Cornwall and Devon, or West Country, style. Cornish wrestlers wear stout, loose canvas jackets; rules allow wrestlers to take hold anywhere above the waist or by any part of the

  • West Covina (Los Angeles county, California, United States)

    West Covina, city, Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. It lies at the eastern end of the San Gabriel Valley and is about 20 miles (30 km) east of the city centre of Los Angeles. Settled in 1905, it began as an agricultural community surrounded by citrus and walnut groves. After World War

  • West Cuvette (region, Republic of the Congo)

    Cuvette: …(Kinshasa) to the southeast; and West Cuvette (Cuvette Oueste), bordered by Gabon to the west. The capital of Cuvette is Owando, while the capital of West Cuvette is Ewo.

  • West Denver (Colorado, United States)

    Grand Junction, city, seat (1883) of Mesa county, western Colorado, U.S. It lies in the Grand Valley (elevation 4,586 feet [1,398 metres]), at the confluence of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers. The area was settled by ranchers in 1881 after the expulsion of the Ute Indians and was first called Ute

  • West Derbyshire (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Derbyshire Dales, district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, England. About half of the district lies within the scenic Peak District National Park. The Romans mined lead in the area between Wirksworth and Castleton, and lead mining continued until the 19th century. Cotton textiles

  • West Des Moines (Iowa, United States)

    West Des Moines, city and suburb of Des Moines (which lies immediately to the east), Polk county, central Iowa, U.S. The area was settled in the 1840s and became an important rail junction in the 1850s called Valley Junction. James Cunningham Jordan, the town’s first settler, operated a station on

  • West Devon (district, England, United Kingdom)

    West Devon, borough (district), administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. The borough lies directly north and east of the city of Plymouth. West Devon encompasses most of Dartmoor in the county’s southeast and is separated from the county of Cornwall on the west by the

  • West Division Parish (Connecticut, United States)

    West Hartford, urban town (township), Hartford county, central Connecticut, U.S. Founded in 1679 as an agricultural community, it was known as West Division Parish or West Society. It became a wealthy residential suburb of Hartford, was named West Hartford in 1806, and was separately incorporated

  • West Dorset (district, England, United Kingdom)

    West Dorset, district, administrative county of Dorset, southern England. The city of Dorchester, in southern West Dorset, is the seat of both the county of Dorset and the district. The district lies almost entirely within the historic county of Dorset, except for small areas along the northern

  • West Dunbartonshire (council area, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    West Dunbartonshire, council area, west-central Scotland, along the north bank of the lower River Clyde, northwest of Glasgow. It extends north to the shore of Loch Lomond, Scotland’s largest lake, and encompasses an area of lowlands surrounding the Kilpatrick Hills, which stand in the centre of

  • West Edmonton Mall (shopping centre, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

    Edmonton: The contemporary city: …world’s largest shopping malls, the West Edmonton Mall, containing a large selection of retail outlets (more than 800 stores), theme parks, hotels, theatres, and many other attractions.

  • West End (area, London, United Kingdom)

    West End, in London, loosely defined area in the boroughs of Westminster and Kensington and Chelsea. Because many of its neighbourhoods and retail districts are among the more affluent of the metropolis, the West End is considered the fashionable end of London. For centuries it has been known for

  • West End Girls (song by Tennant and Lowe)

    Pet Shop Boys: Their first single, “West End Girls,” recorded with American producer Bobby Orlando, became a hit in France and Belgium in 1984, but it was not until two years later that a rerecorded version of the song shot to number one in Britain, the United States, and several other…

  • West Falkland (island, Atlantic Ocean)

    West Falkland, one of the two major islands of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is 80 miles (130 km) long and 45 miles (70 km) wide and rises to 2,297 feet (700 metres) at Mount Adam. The coastline is deeply indented, and the settlement of Port Stephens is located in the

  • West Flanders (province, Belgium)

    Belgium: …northern and northeastern provinces (West Flanders, East Flanders [West-Vlaanderen, Oost-Vlaanderen], Flemish Brabant, Antwerp, and Limburg). Just north of the boundary between Walloon Brabant (Brabant Walloon) and Flemish (Vlaams) Brabant lies the officially bilingual

  • West Florida Controversy (United States history)

    West Florida Controversy, in U.S. history, dispute over the status of the territory lying on the Gulf of Mexico between the Apalachicola and Mississippi rivers. Though Spain claimed the area as part of its New World discovery in 1492, France occupied it as a portion of Louisiana after 1695. Under

  • West Florida Republic (American colony, North America)

    flag of Mississippi: …Mississippi was included in the West Florida Republic, which was proclaimed in 1810 by American settlers in opposition to Spanish rule. Their flag had a blue background with a single white star in the centre. (A similar design was used in the 1830s by pro-independence Americans in Texas.) It was…

  • West Florida Seminary (university, Tallahassee, Florida, United States)

    Florida State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. It is part of the State University System of Florida and consists of eight schools and eight colleges, including a college of engineering that is jointly operated with Florida Agricultural

  • West Florida, University of (university, Pensacola, Florida, United States)

    Pensacola: …there in 1948, and the University of West Florida opened in 1967.

  • West Fork River (river, United States)

    Des Moines River, river rising in Lake Shetek in southwestern Minnesota, U.S., near Pipestone, and flowing 525 mi (845 km) in a southeasterly direction to join the Mississippi River 2 mi southwest of Keokuk, Iowa. Above Humboldt, Iowa, the river is known as the West Fork. The East Fork and the

  • West Fork White River (river, Indiana, United States)

    White River, river of central and southern Indiana, U.S. It rises in Randolph county in the east-central part of the state and flows generally westward past Muncie and Anderson for about 65 miles (105 km). Turning southwestward northeast of Indianapolis, it flows through the city and for another

  • West Francia (historic region, Europe)

    history of Europe: Charlemagne and the Carolingian dynasty: …840 into the regions of West Francia, the Middle Kingdom, and East Francia. The last of these regions gradually assumed control over the Middle Kingdom north of the Alps. In addition, an independent kingdom of Italy survived into the late 10th century. The imperial title went to one of the…

  • West Friese Eilanden (islands, Netherlands)

    West Frisian Islands, part of the chain of Frisian Islands, which lie in the North Sea just off the coast of northwestern Europe. They belong to the

  • West Frisian Islands (islands, Netherlands)

    West Frisian Islands, part of the chain of Frisian Islands, which lie in the North Sea just off the coast of northwestern Europe. They belong to the

  • West Frisian language (language)

    West Germanic languages: Characteristics: …the more or less standard West Frisian that is developing in the province of Friesland.

  • West German Radio (radio station, Cologne, Germany)

    Cologne: Cultural life: …the concert hall of the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR; “West German Radio”), the high reputation of the latter being largely due to the WDR’s encouragement of contemporary music. A full repertoire is offered in theatre and opera as well, and the municipal theatre has its own ballet ensemble.

  • West Germanic languages

    West Germanic languages, group of Germanic languages that developed in the region of the North Sea, Rhine-Weser, and Elbe. Out of the many local West Germanic dialects the following six modern standard languages have arisen: English, Frisian, Dutch (Netherlandic-Flemish), Afrikaans, German, and

  • West Greek (dialect)

    Doric dialect, a dialect of Ancient Greek that in Mycenaean times was spoken by seminomadic Greeks living around the Pindus Mountains. After the Dorian migrations near the end of the 2nd millennium bc, Doric-speaking Greeks were found in the northwest of Greece as well as throughout the P

  • West Greenland Current (current, Atlantic Ocean)

    West Greenland Current, cool flow of water proceeding northward along the west coast of Greenland. See Greenland

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