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  • white admiral (butterfly)

    admiral: The white admiral (L. arthemis), a species made up of a white form and a red-spotted purple form, was once thought to be two distinct species. The white admiral occurs in North America and from Great Britain across Eurasia to Japan, feeds on honeysuckle. The Indian…

  • White Album, The (essays by Didion)

    Joan Didion: In a second collection, The White Album (1979), Didion continued her analysis of the turbulent 1960s. The inner decay of the Establishment is a major theme of the essays constituting the volume After Henry (1992; also published as Sentimental Journeys).

  • White Album, The (album by the Beatles)

    John Lennon: …and “I’m So Tired” on The Beatles (1968) through the solo debut Plastic Ono Band (1970) through his half of Double Fantasy (1980)—reflects Ono’s belief in art without artifice. Whether or not they actually eschewed artifice, that was one impression they strove to create.

  • white alder (plant genus)

    Clethra, genus of 65 species of flowering trees and shrubs, of the family Clethraceae, occurring in North and South America, in Asia, and on the Mediterranean island of Madeira. Often called white alders, they are commonly cultivated for their handsome spikes of white fragrant flowers. The leaves

  • white alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    alder: …on their lower surfaces; the white, or Sierra, alder (A. rhombifolia), an early-flowering tree with orange-red twigs and buds; the speckled alder (A. rugosa), a small tree with conspicuous whitish, wartlike, porous markings, or lenticels; the aromatic-leaved American green alder (A. crispa or A. mitchelliana); the closely related but taller…

  • White Angel Breadline (photograph by Lange)

    Dorothea Lange: Pictures such as White Angel Breadline (1932), showing the desperate condition of these men, were publicly exhibited and received immediate recognition both from the public and from other photographers, especially members of of Group f.64. These photographs also led to a commission in 1935 from the federal Resettlement…

  • White Angel of the Slums (American religious leader)

    Evangeline Cory Booth, Anglo-American Salvation Army leader whose dynamic administration expanded that organization’s services and funding and who became its fourth general. Born in the South Hackney section of London, Eva Booth was the daughter of William Booth, soon afterward founder of the

  • white ant (insect)

    Termite, (order Isoptera), any of a group of cellulose-eating insects, the social system of which shows remarkable parallels with those of ants and bees, although it has evolved independently. Even though termites are not closely related to ants, they are sometimes referred to as white ants.

  • White Army (Russian history)

    Russian Civil War: Seeds of conflict: …Assembly and (2) the rightist whites, whose main asset was the Volunteer Army in the Kuban steppes. This army, which had survived great hardships in the winter of 1917–18 and which came under the command of Gen. Anton I. Denikin (April 1918), was now a fine fighting force, though small…

  • white arsenic (chemical compound)

    arsenic: Commercial production and uses: …principal forms of which are arsenious oxide (As4O6) and arsenic pentoxide (As2O5). Arsenious oxide, commonly known as white arsenic, is obtained as a by-product from the roasting of the ores of copper, lead, and certain other metals as well as by the roasting of arsenopyrite and arsenic sulfide ores. Arsenious…

  • white ash (tree)

    ash: Major species: …important of these are the white ash (Fraxinus americana) and the green ash (F. pennsylvanica), which grow throughout the eastern and much of the central United States and northward into parts of Canada. These two species furnish wood that is stiff, strong, resilient, and yet lightweight. This “white ash” is…

  • white asparagus (plant)

    asparagus: Garden asparagus: This white asparagus is prized for its tenderness and delicate flavour. In classic French culinary nomenclature, the word “Argenteuil” denotes an asparagus garnish.

  • White Australia policy (Australian history)

    White Australia policy, in Australian history, fundamental legislation of the new Commonwealth of Australia that effectively stopped all non-European immigration into the country and that contributed to the development of a racially insulated white society. It reflected a long-standing and unifying

  • White Balloon, The (film by Panahi [1995])

    Jafar Panahi: …film was Bādkonak-e sefīd (1995; The White Balloon), about a young girl who wants to buy a goldfish but loses her money down a sewer drain. The drama—which was written by Kiarostami—earned Panahi the Caméra d’Or, the prize for first-time directors, at the Cannes film festival. In Ayneh (1997; The…

  • white baneberry (plant)

    baneberry: The white baneberry (A. pachypoda; sometimes A. alba), which is native to North America, is 30 to 45 cm (12 to 18 inches) tall and bears white berries. The cohosh, or herb Christopher (A. spicata), native to Eurasia, is approximately 30 to 60 cm (12 to…

  • white bass (fish)

    sea bass: …14 kg (30 pounds); the white bass (M. chrysops), a dark-striped river fish of the eastern United States; and the white perch, a North American Atlantic species reaching a maximum of about 38 cm (15 inches) and 1.4 kg (3 pounds).

  • white basswood (plant)

    linden: caroliniana) and white basswood (T. heterophylla), from the eastern United States, are native on moist soils; they are bee trees that yield a fragrant honey.

  • white bear (mammal)

    Polar bear, (Ursus maritimus), great white northern bear (family Ursidae) found throughout the Arctic region. The polar bear travels long distances over vast desolate expanses, generally on drifting oceanic ice floes, searching for seals, its primary prey. Except for one subspecies of grizzly bear,

  • White Beech: The Rainforest Years (work by Greer)

    Germaine Greer: The memoir White Beech: The Rainforest Years (2013) documents her efforts to restore a plot of rainforest that she purchased in 2001.

  • white bellbird (bird)

    bellbird: …Procnias, although only one, the white bellbird (P. alba), has a call that can actually be described as “bell-like.” Females are drably coloured, but the males are mostly or entirely white. Only the males vocalize, and in three of the four species, the males possess fleshy ornamentation on the head.…

  • white birch (plant)

    Paper birch, (Betula papyrifera), ornamental, shade, and timber tree of the family Betulaceae, native to northern and central North America. Usually about 18 metres (60 feet) tall but occasionally reaching 40 m, the tree has ovate, dark-green, sharp-pointed leaves about 10 centimetres long. The

  • white birch (tree group)

    White birch, any of several species of ornamental and timber trees of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae. The trees are native to cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere and have white, peeling bark. The name white birch also refers to paper birch. One species of white birch, B. pubescens,

  • white blood cell (biology)

    White blood cell, a cellular component of the blood that lacks hemoglobin, has a nucleus, is capable of motility, and defends the body against infection and disease by ingesting foreign materials and cellular debris, by destroying infectious agents and cancer cells, or by producing antibodies. A

  • White Blood Cells (album by the White Stripes)

    the White Stripes: …Stripes released their breakthrough album, White Blood Cells. Michel Gondry’s eye-catching video for the single “Fell in Love with a Girl” received regular airplay on MTV, and the group became media darlings. The duo followed with Elephant (2003), a percussion-driven collection of songs that featured Meg’s debut as a vocalist.…

  • White Bone Yi (people)

    Yi: The far more numerous White Bone Yi and the Jianu (“Family Slaves”) were formerly subjugated or enslaved by the Black Bones. The subjugation of the White Bones and the Jianu was ended by the Chinese government in the 1950s. The White Bones have spread over the highlands of Yunnan…

  • White Boy Rick (film by Demange [2018])

    Matthew McConaughey: … informant and drug trafficker in White Boy Rick (2018). McConaughey’s credits from 2019 included Serenity, a thriller in which his character is solicited by his ex-wife (Anne Hathaway) to commit murder; The Beach Bum, in which he played a pot-smoking poet; and The Gentlemen, a crime dramedy about a drug…

  • White Brahma (Tibetan deity)

    Tshangs-pa Dkar-po, in Tibetan Buddhism, one of the eight fierce protection deities. See

  • White Brahman, the (Jesuit missionary)

    India: The Portuguese: …Roberto de Nobili (1577–1656), nicknamed the White Brahman, and the Jesuit missions to the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar. Of the latter, there was the Inquisition at Goa and the forcible subjection of the Syrian church to Rome at the Synod of Diamper in 1599.

  • white brass (alloy)

    brass: Characteristics of the alloy: Such brasses, known as white brasses, are of little industrial importance, though a granulated form is used in brazing (soldering); they also form the basis for certain alloys used in die-casting. The malleable brasses may be further subdivided into those that can be worked cold (generally those with less…

  • white bread (food)

    human nutrition: Cereals: …to the relative merits of white bread and bread made from whole wheat flour. White flour consists of about 72 percent of the grain but contains little of the germ (embryo) and of the outer coverings (bran). Since the B vitamins are concentrated mainly in the scutellum (covering of the…

  • White Bridge, The (painting by Twachtman)

    John Henry Twachtman: , The White Bridge (1895). Among his best-known works are landscapes depicting winter or early spring scenes with delicate, high-keyed colour and strong, underlying formal construction—e.g., Hemlock Pool (c. 1902). Like the work of other American Impressionists, including William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, Twachtman’s mature…

  • white bryony (plant)

    bryony: White bryony (B. alba) differs from Cretan bryony in having male and female flowers on the same plant and black berries.

  • White Butte (butte, North Dakota, United States)

    North Dakota: Relief: …point in North Dakota is White Butte (3,506 feet [1,069 metres]), near the southwest corner of the state in the Badlands area.

  • White Butterfly (novel by Mosley)

    Walter Mosley: In White Butterfly (1992) the police call on Rawlins to help investigate the vicious murders of four young women—three black and one white. Other novels featuring Rawlins included Black Betty (1994) and A Little Yellow Dog (1996). For the publication of Gone Fishin’ (1997), a prequel…

  • white butterfly (insect)

    White butterfly, (subfamily Pierinae), any of a group of butterflies in the family Pieridae (order Lepidoptera) that are named for their white wings with black marginal markings. The family Pieridae also includes the orange-tip and sulfur butterflies and consists of approximately 1,100 species. The

  • white cake (foodstuff)

    baking: Cakes: Common cake varieties include white cake, similar in formula to yellow cake, except that the white cake uses egg whites instead of whole eggs; devil’s food cake, differing from chocolate cake chiefly in that the devil’s food batter is adjusted to an alkaline level with sodium bicarbonate; chiffon cakes,…

  • White Camelia, Knights of the (American secret society)

    Ku Klux Klan: A similar organization, the Knights of the White Camelia, began in Louisiana in 1867.

  • White Canon (religious order)

    Premonstratensian, a Roman Catholic religious order founded in 1120 by St. Norbert of Xanten, who, with 13 companions, established a monastery at Prémontré, Fr. The order combines the contemplative with the active religious life and in the 12th century provided a link between the strictly

  • White Card, The (play by Rankine)

    Claudia Rankine: …later works included the play The White Card, which explores the racism found in everyday life; it was first staged in 2018.

  • White Cargo (film by Thorpe [1942])

    Hedy Lamarr: …as that of Tondelayo in White Cargo (1942). Hoping to secure more substantial parts, she set up her own production company in 1946, but within three years she returned to her exotic stock-in-trade in Cecil B. DeMille’s Samson and Delilah (1949), her most commercially successful film.

  • White Castle, The (novel by Pamuk)

    Orhan Pamuk: …fame with Beyaz kale (1985; The White Castle), his third novel, which explores the nature of identity through the story of a learned young Italian captured and made a slave to a scholar in 17th-century Istanbul. His subsequent novels, which were widely translated, included Kara kitap (1990; The Black Book),…

  • White Cave (archaeological site, Gobi Desert, Mongolia)

    Gobi: Geology: …during the 1990s at the Tsagaan Agui (White Cave) in southwest-central Mongolia have produced artifacts up to 35,000 years old.

  • white cedar (tree)

    Incense cedar, (species Calocedrus decurrens), ornamental and timber evergreen conifer of the cypress family (Cupressaceae). It is native primarily to the western slopes of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges of North America, at altitudes of 300 to 2,800 metres (1,000 to 9,200 feet). The

  • white cedar (tree)

    False cypress, (genus Chamaecyparis), any of some seven or eight species of ornamental and timber evergreen conifers (family Cupressaceae) native to North America and eastern Asia. The trees differ from the true cypresses in having smaller, rounded cones with fewer seeds. A young tree is pyramidal

  • white cedar (common name of several species of trees)

    White cedar, in the lumber trade, any American arborvitae (q.v.), some species of false cypress (q.v.), and McNab cypress, incense cedar (q.v.), and California juniper. Nonconiferous trees that are called white cedar include the chinaberry and some members of the flowering plant families

  • white cedar (plant)

    American arborvitae, (Thuja occidentalis), ornamental and timber evergreen conifer of the cypress family (Cupressaceae), native to eastern North America. In the lumber trade it is called, among other names, white cedar, eastern white cedar, and New Brunswick cedar. Often 20 m (65 feet) tall, the

  • White Chalk (album by Harvey)

    PJ Harvey: Harvey’s 2007 album, White Chalk, was a return to art song: it was sung almost entirely in falsetto and accompanied by piano (an instrument Harvey barely knew) rather than guitar. Rarely had a rocker so capable of letting go also been so determined to hold back.

  • White Christmas (song by Berlin)

    Irving Berlin: …introduced the touching ballad “White Christmas,” which became one of the most popular songs ever recorded. Altogether Berlin wrote the scores for 19 Broadway shows and 18 motion pictures.

  • White Christmas (film by Curtiz [1954])

    Danny Kaye: …Danish master of fairy tales; White Christmas (1954), a perennial holiday favourite featuring Kaye and Bing Crosby as a song-and-dance team; The Court Jester (1956), a swashbuckler spoof and perhaps Kaye’s most-renowned film; and Merry Andrew (1958), in which Kaye portrayed a mild-mannered archeology professor who becomes a

  • White Citizens Council (American segregation organization)
  • White City (buildings, Tel Aviv–Yafo, Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo: City layout: The White City, as about 4,000 such buildings are collectively known, was constructed in Tel Aviv by European-trained architects between the early 1930s and the late ’40s and was based on the urban plan of Scottish sociologist Sir Patrick Geddes. The White City’s simple, functional style…

  • White City (fort, Moscow, Russia)

    Bely Gorod, fortress and settlement comprising the third defense belt around Moscow, which joined the Kremlin and Kitay-gorod on the left bank of the Moskva River. Built between 1585 and 1593 of stone walls, the fortifications of Bely Gorod were important in providing defense for the Moscow

  • White City (buildings, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Daniel Burnham: The World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893: Nicknamed the “White City,” the fair’s grand Neoclassical buildings were planned as a cohesive whole in a landscaped setting; they made a lasting impression on millions of visitors. Often noted as the inspiration for the City Beautiful movement, the fair proved to be a turning point both…

  • White Cliffs of Dover, The (song by Kent and Burton)

    Vera Lynn: …following year she recorded “The White Cliffs of Dover,” another song that for many came to epitomize the sentiment of the war years. In 1942 she appeared in the film We’ll Meet Again, in which she portrayed a character based on herself. In 1944 Lynn joined the Entertainment National…

  • White Cliffs of Dover, The (film by Brown [1944])

    Clarence Brown: The 1940s and ’50s: The White Cliffs of Dover (1944) was another sentimental but nicely observed wartime tale. The film featured Irene Dunne, Roddy McDowall, and Peter Lawford, and Elizabeth Taylor appeared in an unbilled role. Later in 1944, Taylor starred in Brown’s National Velvet, a classic about a…

  • White Cliffs, The (work by Miller)

    Alice Duer Miller: …1940 with the publication of The White Cliffs, a verse tale of love and fortitude in war-torn Britain. More than 700,000 copies had sold by the end of the war, and Lynn Fontanne’s reading of it had been broadcast on radio twice and recorded. The motion picture The White Cliffs…

  • White Cloud (Winnebago religious leader)

    Black Hawk War: Indian removal and growing tensions in Illinois: … (Winnebago), including a Ho-Chunk prophet, White Cloud.

  • white cloud mountain fish (fish)

    White cloud mountain minnow, (Tanichthys albonubes), small aquarium fish of the carp family, Cyprinidae, native to White Cloud Mountain (Baiyun Shan), Guangdong province, China. It is a slender, hardy fish, about 4 cm (1.5 inches) long. It is greenish brown with a silvery belly and red patches on

  • white cloud mountain minnow (fish)

    White cloud mountain minnow, (Tanichthys albonubes), small aquarium fish of the carp family, Cyprinidae, native to White Cloud Mountain (Baiyun Shan), Guangdong province, China. It is a slender, hardy fish, about 4 cm (1.5 inches) long. It is greenish brown with a silvery belly and red patches on

  • White Cloud Temple (temple, Beijing, China)

    Pai-yün kuan, (Chinese: “White Cloud Temple”) major Taoist temple in Beijing, which was traditionally the center of the Lung-men subsect of the Ch’üan-chen, or Perfect Realization, school of Taoism. Today it is the center of the state-controlled Taoist Association and is both a religious and a

  • white clover (plant)

    clover: …are red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (T. repens), and alsike clover (T. hybridum). Red clover, a biennial, or short-lived perennial, bears an oval purplish flower head about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in diameter. White clover, a low creeping perennial, is often used in lawn-grass mixtures and bears a white…

  • white coal (fossil fuel)

    algae: Evolution and paleontology of algae: …the Permian “white coal,” or tasmanite, deposits of Tasmania and accumulated to a depth of several feet in deposits that extend for miles. Similar deposits in Alaska yield up to 568 litres (150 gallons) of oil per ton of sediment. Certain Ulvophyceae fossils that date from about one billion years…

  • White Company, The (novel by Conan Doyle)

    Arthur Conan Doyle: …his tale of 14th-century chivalry, The White Company (1891), its companion piece, Sir Nigel (1906), and his adventures of the Napoleonic war hero Brigadier Gerard and the 19th-century skeptical scientist Professor George Edward Challenger.

  • white copper (metal alloy)

    Nickel silver, a range of alloys of copper, nickel, and zinc which are silvery in appearance but contain no silver. Its composition varies from 7 to 30 percent nickel, the alloy most widely used being 18 percent nickel silver (18 percent nickel, 62 percent copper, 20 percent zinc). In general the

  • white corpuscle (biology)

    White blood cell, a cellular component of the blood that lacks hemoglobin, has a nucleus, is capable of motility, and defends the body against infection and disease by ingesting foreign materials and cellular debris, by destroying infectious agents and cancer cells, or by producing antibodies. A

  • white crappie (fish)

    crappie: The white crappie (P. annularis) generally inhabits rather warm, silty lakes and rivers. Silvery, with irregular dark markings, it is usually lighter in colour than the similar black crappie, or calico bass (P. nigromaculatus), which tends to frequent clear lakes and streams.

  • White Crow, The (film by Fiennes [2018])

    Ralph Fiennes: He then helmed The White Crow (2018), a biopic about the Russian ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev, who defected to France in 1961. Fiennes portrayed a renowned dance instructor.

  • White Crucifixion (work by Chagall)

    Christology: Early 20th century to the present: …allusions—the cross is barely discernible—his White Crucifixion (1938) categorically puts Jesus in a Jewish context by depicting him with a Jewish prayer shawl around his waist.

  • white cypress (plant)

    false cypress: The white cypress (C. thyoides) of North America, 21 to 27 metres (70 to 90 feet) tall, an economically important timber tree, also has many cultivated varieties. Its reddish brown fragrant wood is used for mine timbers, fence posts, and other supporting structures.

  • white cypress pine (plant)

    cypress pine: …of the genus are the Murray River pine, or white cypress pine (Callitris columellaris), found throughout Australia; the black cypress pine (C. endlicheri) of eastern Australia, locally also called black pine, red pine, and scrub pine; the Port Macquarie pine, or stringybark (C. macleayana), of southeastern Australia; and the common…

  • white damp (chemical compound)

    Carbon monoxide, (CO), a highly toxic, colourless, odourless, flammable gas produced industrially for use in the manufacture of numerous organic and inorganic chemical products; it is also present in the exhaust gases of internal-combustion engines and furnaces as a result of incomplete conversion

  • White Dawn, The (film by Kaufman [1974])

    Philip Kaufman: Early work: …to northern Canada to film The White Dawn (1974), a beautifully photographed (by Michael Chapman) tale about whalers (Warren Oates, Louis Gossett, Jr., and Timothy Bottoms) who are stranded in the Arctic at the turn of the 20th century. They are saved and sheltered by a tribe of Inuit, but…

  • White Dawns (work by Racin)

    Macedonian literature: …poems in Beli mugri (1939; White Dawns), which include many elements of oral folk poetry, were prohibited by the government of pre-World War II Yugoslavia because of their realistic and powerful portrayal of the exploited and impoverished Macedonian people. Some writers, such as Kole Nedelkovski, worked and published abroad because…

  • white death (fish)

    White shark, (Carcharodon carcharias), any member of the largest living species of the mackerel sharks (Lamnidae) and one of the most powerful and dangerous predatory sharks in the world. Starring as the villain of movies such as Jaws (1975), the white shark is much maligned and publicly feared.

  • White Deer Grotto Academy (Chinese philosophical society)

    Confucianism: The Song masters: Zhu Xi reestablished the White Deer Grotto in present Jiangxi province as an academy. It became the intellectual centre of his age and provided an instructional model for all schools in East Asia for generations to come.

  • White Devil, The (play by Webster)

    The White Devil, tragedy in five acts by John Webster, performed and published as The White Divel in 1612. Based on historical events that occurred in Italy during the 1580s, this dark Jacobean drama is considered one of the finest of the period. The White Devil centres on the love affair between

  • White Divel, The (play by Webster)

    The White Devil, tragedy in five acts by John Webster, performed and published as The White Divel in 1612. Based on historical events that occurred in Italy during the 1580s, this dark Jacobean drama is considered one of the finest of the period. The White Devil centres on the love affair between

  • White Dog (film by Fuller [1982])

    Samuel Fuller: Last films: &gt;White Dog (1982) was to have followed immediately after, but Paramount deemed the story—an African American dog trainer (Paul Winfield) is asked by an actress (Kristy McNichol) to retrain an animal that was reared to attack African Americans—too controversial for release. Although the film (based…

  • white dwarf star (astronomy)

    White dwarf star, any of a class of faint stars representing the endpoint of the evolution of intermediate- and low-mass stars. White dwarf stars, so called because of the white colour of the first few that were discovered, are characterized by a low luminosity, a mass on the order of that of the

  • White Egrets (poetry by Walcott)

    Derek Walcott: …is a central theme in White Egrets (2010), a volume of new poems.

  • white end refinery (sugar refining)

    sugar: Sugar refining: …remainder is consumed as plantation white or as raw sugar. In tropical regions, small “white end” refineries are often built to refine the raw sugar produced by cane-processing plants. Raw sugar factories produce their own steam by burning bagasse, and a reasonably efficient plant has as much as 20 percent…

  • white ensign (British flag)

    ensign: Since 1864 the white ensign (further distinguished by having a red St. George’s cross quartered upon it) has been reserved for use by the Royal Navy and by the Royal Yacht Squadron. Passenger liners or other merchant vessels manned by a prescribed percentage of officers and men of…

  • White Fang (novel by London)

    White Fang, novel by Jack London, published in 1906. The novel was intended as a companion piece to The Call of the Wild (1903), in which a domesticated dog reverts to a wild state. White Fang is the story of a wolf dog that is rescued from its brutal owner and gradually becomes domesticated

  • White Fang (film by Kleiser [1991])

    Ethan Hawke: …in 15 motion pictures, including White Fang (1991), an adaptation of Jack London’s novel; Alive (1993), a drama based on the true story of a Uruguayan rugby team’s fight for survival after its plane crashes in the Andes Mountains; and Reality Bites (1994), which centred on a group of twentysomethings…

  • white fat cell (biology)

    adipose cell: …two types of adipose cells: white adipose cells contain large fat droplets, only a small amount of cytoplasm, and flattened, noncentrally located nuclei; and brown adipose cells contain fat droplets of differing size, a large amount of cytoplasm, numerous mitochondria, and round, centrally located nuclei. The chief chemical constituents of…

  • White Fathers (Roman Catholic society)

    White Father, a Roman Catholic international missionary society of priests and brothers whose sole field of activity is Africa. It was founded in North Africa in 1868 by the archbishop of Algiers, Charles-Martial-Allemand Lavigerie. The society’s first missions were in northern Algeria. In 1878 its

  • White Fence, Port Kent, N.Y. (photograph by Strand)

    Paul Strand: …boldest photographs of the period, White Fence (1916), Strand deliberately destroyed perspective to build a powerful composition from tonal planes and rhythmic pattern.

  • white fibre (physiology)

    fish processing: Structure of skeletal muscles: The high percentage of white fibres allows fish to swim with sudden, rapid movements and gives the meat its white colour. These fibres primarily metabolize glucose, a simple sugar released from muscle glycogen stores, for energy production through anaerobic (i.e., in the absence of oxygen) glycolysis. Therefore, white fibres…

  • White Flag Party (political party, Myanmar)

    Thakin Than Tun: …in March 1948, establishing his White Flag Party. He organized guerrilla forces in central Burma, but the government was largely successful in containing his insurgents.

  • white flood (hydrology)

    Niger River: Hydrology: …Niger, a first high-water discharge—the white flood (so called because of the light sediment content of the water)—occurs soon after the rainy season between July and October; a second rise—the black flood (so called because of the greater sediment content)—begins in December with the arrival of floodwaters from upstream. May…

  • white forest (vegetation)

    South America: Caatinga: Caatinga (white forest) refers to the generally stunted, somewhat sparse, and often thorny vegetation of the dry interior of northeastern Brazil. Trees, leafless for long periods and able to resist drought, also are characteristic, particularly in the basin of the S?o Francisco River. Dominant…

  • white fox (mammal)

    Arctic fox, (Vulpes lagopus), northern fox of the family Canidae, found throughout the Arctic region, usually on tundra or mountains near the sea. Fully grown adults reach about 50–60 cm (20–24 inches) in length, exclusive of the 30-cm (12-inch) tail, and a weight of about 3–8 kg (6.6–17 pounds).

  • White Friar (religious order)

    Carmelite: …Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel; White Friars; O.Carm.) is engaged primarily in preaching and teaching. The Discalced Carmelite Fathers (Order of Discalced Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel; O.C.D.) is active in parishes and in foreign missions, having become primarily a pastoral and devotional order. Both branches…

  • white ginger (plant)

    ginger lily: coronarium, known as white ginger, and the yellow-flowered H. flavum, or yellow ginger, are among the most commonly used species in the leis of Hawaii.

  • white glue (adhesive)

    polyvinyl acetate: …common household adhesive known as white glue or Elmer’s glue.

  • White Goddess, The (work by Graves)

    The White Goddess, scholarly work by Robert Graves, published in 1948 and revised in 1952 and 1961. Graves’s controversial and unorthodox theories of mythology, part invention and part based on his research into pre-Classical religions, shocked many because of their basic feminist premise.

  • White Goddess; A Historical Grammar of Poetic Myth, The (work by Graves)

    The White Goddess, scholarly work by Robert Graves, published in 1948 and revised in 1952 and 1961. Graves’s controversial and unorthodox theories of mythology, part invention and part based on his research into pre-Classical religions, shocked many because of their basic feminist premise.

  • white gossamer (plant)

    spiderwort: Major species: White velvet, or white-gossamer (T. sillamontana), has leaves and stems covered with a whitish fuzz. Flowering inch plant (T. cerinthoides), with leaves green and smooth above and purplish and fuzzy beneath, has purplish hairy blossoms. T.×andersoniana comprises a complex series of garden hybrids. Also grown…

  • white gourd (plant)

    Wax gourd, (Benincasa hispida), fleshy vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), grown for its edible fruits. The wax gourd is native to tropical Asia, where it is commonly used in soups, curries, and stir-fries and is sometimes made into a beverage. Like other gourds, the fruit has a long shelf

  • white granite (pottery)

    Granite City: …base for the production of graniteware (enameled ironware), and the city was founded four years later. Although graniteware gave the city its name, the product is no longer manufactured there. Steel founding began in Granite City in 1894 and is the basis of the economy. The manufacture of automotive parts…

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