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  • Wilco (American band)

    Wilco, American band led by singer-songwriter Jeff Tweedy that spun off from the group Uncle Tupelo in the mid-1990s and evolved from its alternative country roots into one of the most successful and multifaceted rock groups of its time. The original members were Jeff Tweedy (in full Jeffrey Scott

  • Wilco (The Album) (album by Wilco)

    Wilco: … (2007) and the career-spanning compendium Wilco (The Album), released in 2009. On a track from the latter, “Wilco (The Song),” Tweedy even demonstrated a sense of humour, singing, “Wilco will love you, baby.”

  • Wilcox, Desmond John (British director)

    Desmond John Wilcox, British television executive and documentarian (born May 21, 1931, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, Eng.—died Sept. 6, 2000, London, Eng.), made memorable television documentaries noted for their humanitarian aspects, among them Americans (1979) and, especially, The Boy D

  • Wilcox, Ella Wheeler (American poet and journalist)

    Ella Wheeler Wilcox, American poet and journalist who is perhaps best remembered for verse tinged with an eroticism that, while rather oblique, was still unconventional for her time. Ella Wheeler from an early age was an avid reader of popular literature, especially the novels of E.D.E.N.

  • Wilcox, Fred M. (American director)

    Forbidden Planet: Production notes and credits:

  • Wilcox, Harvey (American Prohibitionist)

    Hollywood: …real-estate subdivision in 1887 by Harvey Wilcox, a prohibitionist from Kansas who envisioned a community based on his sober religious principles. Real-estate magnate H.J. Whitley, known as the “Father of Hollywood,” subsequently transformed Hollywood into a wealthy and popular residential area. At the turn of the 20th century, Whitley was…

  • Wilcox, Marjorie (British actress)

    Dame Anna Neagle, British actress and dancer, known for her work in stage plays, musicals, and films. Her motion-picture career was guided by her husband, producer-director Herbert Wilcox. Neagle debuted as a dancer in The Wonder Tales (London, 1917). Her first real lead was as a juvenile with Jack

  • Wilcox, Thomas (British clergyman)

    Admonition to Parliament: …London clergymen John Field and Thomas Wilcox, that demanded that Queen Elizabeth I restore the “purity” of New Testament worship in the Church of England and eliminate the remaining Roman Catholic elements and practices from the Church of England. Reflecting wide Presbyterian influence among Puritans, the admonition advocated greater direct…

  • Wilcoxon signed-rank test (statistics)

    statistics: Nonparametric methods: The Wilcoxon signed-rank test can be used to test hypotheses about two populations. In collecting data for this test, each element or experimental unit in the sample must generate two paired or matched data values, one from population 1 and one from population 2. Differences between…

  • Wilcy (people)

    Polab: …principalities, the Obodrites and the Lutycy, or Wilcy. The many Lutycy tribes, of which the Ratarowie and Stodoranie (Hawolanie) were the most important, were subdued by Lothar of Saxony and Albert the Bear of Brandenburg in the 12th century. The other Polab groups were also subjugated by the Germans in…

  • Wilczek, Frank (American physicist)

    Frank Wilczek, American physicist who, with David J. Gross and H. David Politzer, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2004 for discoveries regarding the strong force—the nuclear force that binds together quarks (the smallest building blocks of matter) and holds together the nucleus of the

  • Wild (film by Vallée [2014])

    Nick Hornby: …the screenplays for the films Wild (2014), based on Cheryl Strayed’s inspirational memoir about hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, and Brooklyn (2015), an adaptation of Colm Toibin’s novel about the romantic entanglements of a young Irish immigrant to the United States. His work on the latter film earned Hornby his…

  • Wild 2 (comet)

    comet: Spacecraft exploration of comets: …dust from the coma of Comet 81P/Wild 2. At a flyby speed of 6.1 km per second (13,600 miles per hour), the dust samples would be completely destroyed by impact with a hard collector. Therefore, Stardust used a material made of silica (sand) called aerogel that had a very low…

  • wild allspice (plant)

    Spicebush, (Lindera benzoin), deciduous, dense shrub of the laurel family (Lauraceae), native to eastern North America. It occurs most often in damp woods and grows about 1.5–6 m (about 5–20 feet) tall. The alternate leaves are rather oblong, but wedge-shaped near the base, and 8–13 cm (3–5 inches)

  • Wild Angels, The (film by Corman [1966])

    Roger Corman: The Wild Angels (1966) was a sordid biker film that was based on the exploits of the Hell’s Angels and starred Peter Fonda, Bruce Dern, and Nancy Sinatra. The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1967) was a relatively faithful account of the notorious 1929 slaughter, starring…

  • wild animal act (circus)

    circus: Wild animal acts: Until the late 20th century there was a marked difference between European and American styles of presenting wild animal acts. In the 19th century Van Amburgh, believing that the trainer must demonstrate physical superiority over his “pupils,” had customarily beat his animals…

  • Wild Animals I Have Known (work by Seton)

    Ernest Thompson Seton: …into his most popular book, Wild Animals I Have Known (1898). He continued to write such books into the 1940s.

  • wild ass (mammal)

    Ass, either of two species belonging to the horse family, Equidae, especially the African wild ass (Equus africanus) sometimes referred to as the true ass. The related Asiatic wild ass, sometimes called the Asian wild ass or the half-ass (E. hemionus), is usually known by the local names of its

  • Wild Ass’s Skin, The (novel by Balzac)

    The Wild Ass’s Skin, novel by Honoré de Balzac, published in two volumes in 1831 as La Peau de chagrin and later included as part of the études philosophiques section of La Comédie humaine (The Human Comedy). A poor young writer, Raphael de Valentin, is given a magical ass’s skin that will grant

  • Wild at Heart (film by Lynch [1990])

    David Lynch: Wild at Heart (1990), Lynch’s adaptation of Barry Gifford’s novel about a young couple who take to the road, pursued by various hit men, won the Palm d’Or at the Cannes film festival. However, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992), a prequel to the…

  • wild Bactrian camel (mammal)

    camel: bactrianus) and the wild Bactrian camel (C. ferus) have two.

  • wild bean (plant)

    groundnut: …nut; Apois americana, also called wild bean and potato bean, the tubers of which are edible; and Lathyrus tuberosa, also called earth-nut pea. Cyperus esculentus, nut sedge or yellow nut grass, is a papyrus relative (family Cyperaceae) that also bears edible tubers, especially in the variety called chufa or earth…

  • wild bergamot (herb)

    Monarda: M. fistulosa, growing to 1.5 m (5 feet) tall, has a minty aroma. The more sharply scented Oswego tea (M. didyma), shorter and with scarlet flowers, is native in eastern North America but is widely cultivated elsewhere.

  • Wild Berries (novel by Yevtushenko)

    Yevgeny Yevtushenko: …and published in English as Wild Berries in 1984; that same year, a novella, Ardabiola, appeared in English translation. In 1978 he embarked on an acting career, and in 1981 a book of his photographs, Invisible Threads, was published. He published more poetry in The Collected Poems, 1952–1990 (1991), The…

  • wild bleeding heart (plant)

    bleeding heart: …as the shorter eastern, or wild, bleeding heart (D. eximia), which produces sprays of small pink flowers from April to September in the Allegheny mountain region of eastern North America. The Pacific, or western, bleeding heart (D. formosa) of mountain woods, which ranges from California to British Columbia, has several…

  • wild boar

    Wild boar, any of the wild members of the pig species Sus scrofa (family Suidae, order Artiodactyla), the ancestors of domestic pigs. See

  • wild boar (mammal)

    Boar, any of the wild members of the pig species Sus scrofa, family Suidae. The term boar is also used to designate the male of the domestic pig, guinea pig, and various other mammals. The term wild boar, or wild pig, is sometimes used to refer to any wild member of the Sus genus. The wild

  • Wild Boy of Aveyron, The (work by Itard)

    Jean-Marc-Gaspard Itard: …le sauvage de l’Aveyron (1807; Reports on the Savage of Aveyron), he explained the methods that he used (1801–05) in trying to train and educate an unsocialized 11-year-old boy who had been found in a forest in Aveyron, south of Paris.

  • Wild Boys of the Road (film by Wellman [1933])

    William Wellman: Films of the early to mid-1930s: …turning to the pre-Code gem Wild Boys of the Road (1933), a message film in the best Warner Brothers tradition about three Great Depression-ravaged kids who take to the road in search of a better life.

  • Wild Bull of the Pampas (Argentine boxer)

    Luis Firpo, Argentine professional boxer. Firpo moved to the United States in 1922 after having compiled an outstanding record during the first three years of his career in South America. He won his first 10 American matches by knockout before being involved in a 10-round no-decision match against

  • Wild Bunch (American outlaws)

    Wild Bunch, a collection of cowboy-outlaws who flourished in the 1880s and ’90s in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and surrounding states and territories. Their chief hideouts were Hole in the Wall, a nearly inaccessible grassy canyon and rocky retreat in north-central Wyoming; Brown’s Hole (now Brown’s

  • Wild Bunch, The (film by Peckinpah [1969])

    The Wild Bunch, American western film, released in 1969, that is a classic of the genre and widely considered Sam Peckinpah’s finest movie. Although the film’s graphic violence caused much controversy at the time of its release, the climactic shoot-out is arguably the best-directed and

  • wild calla (plant)

    calla: …known as the arum lily, water arum, or wild calla. As a common name calla is also generally given to several species of Zantedeschia, which are often called calla lilies.

  • wild canary (bird)

    goldfinch: The 13-cm (5-inch) American goldfinch (C. tristis), also called wild canary, is found across North America; the male is bright yellow, with black cap, wings, and tail. The 10-cm (4-inch) dark-backed goldfinch (C. psaltria) ranges from the western U.S. (where it is called lesser goldfinch) to Peru.

  • wild cane (plant)

    sugarcane: Breeding: For example, the wild cane S. spontaneum contains little sugar, and it is immune to most diseases; it has been used extensively by breeders to improve commercial varieties.

  • wild Canterbury bell (plant)

    Phacelia: …similar areas the closely related California bluebell, or wild Canterbury bell (P. whitlavia), has urn-shaped blooms.

  • wild card (playing card)

    poker: Cards: …certain cards may be designated wild cards. A wild card stands for any other card its holder wishes to name. There are many methods of introducing wild cards into the game. The most popular are:

  • Wild Card team (baseball)

    baseball: Movement and expansion: …an additional round and a Wild Card (the team with the best record among the non-division-winning teams in each league). The play-offs were again expanded in 2012, when a second Wild Card was added to each league. Under the revised system, the two Wild Card teams play a one-game play-off,…

  • wild carrot (plant)

    Queen Anne’s lace, (Daucus carota carota), biennial subspecies of plant in the parsley family (Apiaceae) that is an ancestor of the cultivated carrot. It grows to 1.5 metres (5 feet) tall and has bristly, divided leaves. It bears umbels (flat-topped clusters) of white or pink flowers with a single

  • wild cashew (tree)

    Wild cashew, (Anacardium excelsum), tropical forest tree of the cashew family (Anacardiaceae), native to Central and South America. Wild cashew trees are characteristic of both secondary and old growth forests. As its name suggests, the wild cashew is closely related to the domesticated cashew

  • Wild Cat Falling (novel by Johnson)

    Colin Johnson: Johnson’s first novel, Wild Cat Falling (1965), is the story of a young outcast of partial Aboriginal ancestry who is searching for his identity. The protagonist of Long Live Sandawara (1979) attempts to establish his own resistance movement in the slums of Perth. Doctor Wooreddy’s Prescription for Enduring…

  • wild chestnut (plant)
  • wild children

    Feral children, children who, through either accident or deliberate isolation, have grown up with limited human contact. Such children have often been seen as inhabiting a boundary zone between human and animal existence; for this reason the motif of the child reared by animals is a recurring theme

  • wild cinnamon (plant)

    Canellales: Economic and ecological importance: …West Indian Canella alba (wild cinnamon), known sometimes by the synonym C. winterana, have some use as a condiment and for medicinal purposes. It has been used to flavour tobacco and as a fish poison. The timber is known as Bahama whitewood. The trees of this species are cultivated…

  • Wild Coast (historical region, South America)

    Guyana: Early history: …region long known as the Wild Coast. It was the Dutch who finally began European settlement, establishing trading posts upriver in about 1580. By the mid-17th century the Dutch had begun importing slaves from West Africa to cultivate sugarcane. In the 18th century the Dutch, joined by other Europeans, moved…

  • wild coffee (plant)

    feverwort: …plants are tinker’s weed and wild coffee.

  • wild columbine (plant)

    columbine: The wild columbine of North America (A. canadensis) grows in woods and on rocky ledges from southern Canada southward. It is 30 to 90 cm tall. The flowers are red with touches of yellow and are pollinated by hummingbirds.

  • Wild Company (film by McCarey [1930])

    Leo McCarey: Feature films: …Twentieth Century-Fox) and then made Wild Company (1930), an account of a spoiled youth (played by Frank Albertson) who is framed for murder; the drama is memorable for featuring Bela Lugosi, who portrayed a nightclub owner. McCarey next directed the popular musical Let’s Go Native (1930), which starred Jeanette MacDonald,…

  • wild cucumber (plant)

    Wild cucumber, (species Echinocystis lobata), climbing plant of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to eastern North America. The true balsam apple is Momordica balsamina. The wild cucumber has leaves with three to seven sharp lobes; forked, coiled tendrils; six-petaled white flowers; and a

  • wild dog, African (mammal)

    African wild dog, (Lycaon pictus), wild African carnivore that differs from the rest of the members of the dog family (Canidae) in having only four toes on each foot. Its coat is short, sparse, and irregularly blotched with yellow, black, and white. The African wild dog is about 76–102 cm (30–41

  • wild duck (bird)

    Mallard, (Anas platyrhynchos), abundant “wild duck” of the Northern Hemisphere that is the ancestor of most domestic ducks. Breeding throughout Europe, most of Asia, and northern North America, mallards winter as far south as North Africa, India, and southern Mexico. During the 20th century,

  • Wild Duck, The (play by Ibsen)

    The Wild Duck, drama in five acts by Henrik Ibsen, published in 1884 as Vildanden and produced the following year. In the play, an idealistic outsider’s gratuitous truth-telling destroys a family. Gregers Werle, who has a compulsion to tell the truth at all costs, reveals to the Ekdal family

  • Wild Flag (American rock band)

    Sleater-Kinney: …an actress—helped found the band Wild Flag, which debuted with a self-titled album in 2011. In addition, Brownstein was a creator, writer, and actress on the popular television show Portlandia (2011–18).

  • wild flax (plant)

    community ecology: Gene-for-gene coevolution: …best-studied example is that of wild flax (Linum marginale) and flax rust (Melampsora lini) in Australia. Local populations of flax plants and flax rust harbour multiple matching genes for resistance and avirulence. The number of genes and their frequency within local populations fluctuate greatly over time as coevolution continues. In…

  • wild flower (plant)

    Wildflower, any flowering plant that has not been genetically manipulated. Generally the term applies to plants growing without intentional human aid, particularly those flowering in spring and summer in woodlands, prairies, and mountains. Wildflowers are the source of all cultivated garden

  • Wild Gallant, The (play by Dryden)

    John Dryden: Writing for the stage: His first play, The Wild Gallant, a farcical comedy with some strokes of humour and a good deal of licentious dialogue, was produced in 1663. It was a comparative failure, but in January 1664 he had some share in the success of The Indian Queen, a heroic tragedy…

  • Wild Garden (work by Robinson)

    William Robinson: …English wildflowers, led to his Wild Garden (1870; reprinted in facsimile, 1978). This and his Alpine Flowers for English Gardens (1870) and The English Flower Garden (1883) were, in effect, an assault on the contemporary formal architectural garden, on the use of exotics, and all obviously artificial gardening practices. The…

  • Wild Geese (work by Ostenso)

    Canadian literature: Modern period, 1900–60: Martha Ostenso’s Wild Geese (1925), a tale of a strong young girl in thrall to her cruel father, and Frederick Philip Grove’s Settlers of the Marsh (1925) and Fruits of the Earth (1933), depicting man’s struggle for mastery of himself and his land, are moving testaments to…

  • Wild Geese, The (film by McLaglen [1978])

    Richard Burton: Where Eagles Dare (1968), The Wild Geese (1978), and 1984 (1984), the latter of which was his final feature film. Burton also occasionally appeared on television, notably playing Winston Churchill in the TV movie The Gathering Storm (1974) and Richard Wagner in the miniseries Wagner, which first aired in…

  • Wild Gift (album by X)

    X: …effort and the follow-up albums Wild Gift (1981) and Under the Big Black Sun (1982) drew critical raves, as X broadened punk’s do-it-yourself ethos with excellent musicianship (Zoom, who had once played with rock-and-roll pioneer Gene Vincent, blazed through country, rockabilly, heavy metal, and punk licks with dispassionate

  • wild ginger (herb)

    Wild ginger, any of about 75 species of the genus Asarum, perennial herbs of the birthwort family (Aristolochiaceae), distributed throughout North Temperate areas of the world. The leaves and underground stems (rhizomes) of some Asarum species give off a pleasant odour when bruised, and dried

  • Wild Grass (film by Resnais)

    Alain Resnais: …comedy Les Herbes folles (Wild Grasses) premiered at Cannes, and the film festival presented Resnais with a Lifetime Achievement Award. His final films, Vous n’avez encore rien vu (2012; You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet) and Aimer, boire et chanter (2014; Life of Riley), were also praised by critics.

  • wild horse (mammal)

    Assateague Island National Seashore: …Island is renowned for its wild horses, which actually are feral, formerly domesticated animals. They are the size of ponies; their diminutive size is mainly attributed to a relatively poor diet of mostly beach grass and cordgrass and exposure to often harsh environmental conditions. They live in two herds, one…

  • Wild Horses (film by Duvall [2015])

    Robert Duvall: …movies included the crime drama Wild Horses (2015), which he also directed and cowrote, and the thriller Widows (2018).

  • wild hyacinth (plant)

    bluebell: …clusters of English bluebell, or wild hyacinth (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), and Spanish bluebell (H. hispanica) are borne on plants about 30 cm (1 foot) tall. Both species are cultivated as garden ornamentals.

  • wild hydrangea (plant)

    hydrangea: Hills-of-snow, or wild hydrangea (H. arborescens), a shrub slightly more than 1 metre (4 feet) tall, has rounded clusters of white flowers. The French hydrangea, or hortensia (H. macrophylla), is widely cultivated in many varieties for its large globular flower clusters in colours of rose,…

  • wild ipecac (plant)

    Feverwort, any of the four North American plant species of the genus Triosteum, all coarse perennials belonging to the family Caprifoliaceae. Several other species of the genus are East Asian. The common names feverwort, wild ipecac, and horse gentian resulted from former medicinal uses of the

  • Wild Iris, The (poetry by Glück)

    Louise Glück: …won a Pulitzer Prize for The Wild Iris (1992). Her later works included Meadowlands (1996), The First Five Books of Poems (1997), and The Seven Ages (2001). Averno (2006) was her well-received treatment of the Persephone myth. The poems collected in A Village Life (2009)—about existence in a small Mediterranean…

  • Wild Irish Girl, The (novel by Morgan)

    Irish literature: Ferguson, Owenson, and Edgeworth: …it was her romantic novel The Wild Irish Girl (1806) that made her a household name. This partly epistolary novel, set in Ireland, concerns the romance between Horatio, a young Englishman, and Glorvina, whose father’s Irish estate has been destroyed by Horatio’s father. Owenson was also one of the earliest…

  • Wild Is the Wind (film by Cukor [1957])

    Anthony Quinn: …in the memorable motion pictures Wild Is the Wind (1957), The Savage Innocents (1959), The Guns of Navarone (1961), Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), and Lawrence of Arabia (1962).

  • wild lavender (plant)

    Chaste tree, (Vitex agnus-castus), aromatic shrub growing to 5 metres (about 16 feet) tall, bearing spikes of rose-lavender flowers. It belongs in the verbena family (Verbenaceae), order Lamiales. Its pliable twigs are used in basketry, and its red fruits are used for flavouring. The undersides of

  • wild madder (plant)
  • wild mallard (bird)

    Mallard, (Anas platyrhynchos), abundant “wild duck” of the Northern Hemisphere that is the ancestor of most domestic ducks. Breeding throughout Europe, most of Asia, and northern North America, mallards winter as far south as North Africa, India, and southern Mexico. During the 20th century,

  • wild mango (plant)

    Wild mango, any of several species of tropical African trees belonging to the genus Irvingia of the family Irvingiaceae. Irvingia gabonensis, or dika, and other species (such as I. wombolu) are notable for their edible yellow fruit, which somewhat resembles the mango. Dika seeds are rich in a fat

  • wild marjoram (herb)

    Oregano, (Origanum vulgare), aromatic perennial herb of the mint family (Lamiaceae) known for its flavourful dried leaves and flowering tops. Oregano is native to the hills of the Mediterranean countries and western Asia and has naturalized in parts of Mexico and the United States. The herb has

  • wild mint (plant)

    mint: Wild mint (M. arvensis), native in North America and Eurasia, reaches about 1 metre (about 3.3 feet) high. Pennyroyal, M. pulegium, has small oval obtuse leaves and flowers in axillary whorls; it is remarkable for its creeping habit and pungent odour. It has been used…

  • wild oat (plant)

    Wild oat, (genus Avena), genus of tufted annual grasses of the family Poaceae, native to Eurasia and Africa. Wild oats are sometimes cut for hay, and young plants provide forage for grazing animals. All species have edible seeds, and domesticated oats (Avena sativa) are an important cereal crop in

  • Wild Oats (film by Tennant [2016])

    Shirley MacLaine: In Wild Oats (2016) MacLaine was cast as a widow who, after mistakenly receiving a life insurance check for $5 million, goes to the Canary Islands with her best friend (played by Jessica Lange). The film underwent numerous production delays because of financial difficulties, and MacLaine…

  • wild oleander (plant)

    loosestrife: Swamp loosestrife, water willow, or wild oleander (Decodon verticillatus) is a perennial herb native to swamps and ponds of eastern North America.

  • Wild One, The (film by Benedek [1953])

    The Wild One, American dramatic film, released in 1953, that was deemed scandalous for its day. Marlon Brando’s portrayal of a brooding biker in a black leather jacket helped launch both the film and an international interest in motorcycle gangs such as the Hell’s Angels. The plot is loosely based

  • Wild Orchid, The (work by Undset)

    Norwegian literature: Poetry and the novel: Her later novels, Gymnadenia (1929; The Wild Orchid) and Den br?ndende busk (1930; The Burning Bush), were overtly influenced by her conversion to Roman Catholicism. Olav Duun, also of the midnorth region, revealed his insight into life as endless conflict in a six-volume novel cycle about the development of a…

  • Wild Orchids (film by Franklin [1929])

    Sidney Franklin: …of a Javanese prince in Wild Orchids (1929).

  • Wild Palms, The (novel by Faulkner)

    William Faulkner: Later life and works: The novel The Wild Palms (1939) was again technically adventurous, with two distinct yet thematically counterpointed narratives alternating, chapter by chapter, throughout. But Faulkner was beginning to return to the Yoknapatawpha County material he had first imagined in the 1920s and subsequently exploited in short-story form. The…

  • wild pansy (plant)

    pansy: The wild pansy, also known as johnny-jump-up, heartsease, and love-in-idleness, has been widely naturalized in North America. The flowers of this form are usually purple and yellow and less than 2 cm (0.8 inch) across.

  • wild passion-flower (plant)

    passion-flower: The wild passion-flower, passion vine, or maypop (P. incarnata) climbs about 3 to 9 m (10 to 30 feet) high and has pink and white flowers about 4 to 7.5 cm (1.5 to 3 inches) across and a yellow, berrylike, edible fruit about 5 cm long.…

  • wild pig (mammal)

    Boar, any of the wild members of the pig species Sus scrofa, family Suidae. The term boar is also used to designate the male of the domestic pig, guinea pig, and various other mammals. The term wild boar, or wild pig, is sometimes used to refer to any wild member of the Sus genus. The wild

  • wild pink (plant)

    Dragon’s-mouth, (Arethusa bulbosa), species of terrestrial orchid (family Orchidaceae) found only in North American bogs. The plant is the only species in the genus Arethusa. The dragon’s-mouth orchid is a perennial plant with a small corm and a single grasslike leaf. It produces a solitary reddish

  • wild pitch (baseball)

    baseball: The scorecard: …from the catcher is a wild pitch (a pitch so off target that the catcher had no chance to catch it) or a passed ball (a pitch that should have been handled by the catcher). Members of the media and fans often choose to keep score of the game also.…

  • wild potato (plant)

    Christopher McCandless: …that the seeds of the wild potato, or Eskimo potato (Hedysarum alpinum), had disabled him. Research undertaken years afterward at the behest of McCandless’s biographer Jon Krakauer and others identified the most probable agent of harm as l-canavanine, an amino acid that is found in wild potato seeds and functions…

  • wild pumpkin (plant)

    Calabazilla, (Cucurbita foetidissima), perennial prostrate vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to southwestern North America. Although calabazilla is a fairly unattractive plant with a fetid odour, it is sometimes grown as an ornamental in arid and semiarid areas for its colourful

  • wild radish (plant)

    Wild radish, (Raphanus raphanistrum), widespread annual plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), native to Eurasia. Wild radish has naturalized throughout much of the world and is a noxious agricultural weed in many places. The plant is believed by some authorities to be the ancestor of the

  • Wild Reef (exhibit, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Shedd Aquarium: Three years later, a Wild Reef exhibit was inaugurated, with 26 interconnected habitats that allowed patrons to explore a Philippine coral reef.

  • wild rice (plant)

    Wild rice, (genus Zizania), genus of four species of coarse grasses of the family Poaceae, the grain of which is sometimes grown as a delicacy. Despite their name, the plants are not related to true rice (Oryza sativa). Wild rice grows naturally in shallow freshwater marshes and along the shores of

  • Wild River (film by Kazan [1960])

    Elia Kazan: Films, stage work, and writing of the 1960s and ’70s: …Hollywood in 1960 to make Wild River, which proved to be a strong vehicle for the talents of Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick. Splendor in the Grass (1961) was a hit on an entirely different scale, with Warren Beatty (in his movie debut) and Natalie Wood at the centre of…

  • Wild Rose (art glass)

    Libbey Inc.: …included a peachblow glass called Wild Rose, which was an opaque coloured glass with a glossy finish shading from white to deep rose; the amberina glass, with pale amber and ruby tones; and the Pomona, which has a frosted surface and a light yellow colour.

  • Wild Rovers, The (film by Edwards [1971])

    Blake Edwards: Films of the 1970s: …more modest in scale was The Wild Rovers (1971), a western buddy film with William Holden and Ryan O’Neal. It was dismissed at the time, but critical esteem for it grew over the years. The Carey Treatment (1972), a mystery set in a Boston hospital, was taken out of Edwards’s…

  • wild rye (plant)

    Wild rye, (genus Elymus), genus of some 50–100 species of perennial grasses in the family Poaceae, native to temperate and cool parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Wild ryes are named for their similarity to true rye (Secale cereale) and are generally good forage plants. Wild rye plants are typically

  • wild sarsaparilla (plant)

    Araliaceae: Wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis) has an aromatic root that is used as a substitute for sarsaparilla. Ginseng root, from Panax ginseng, has long been used by the Chinese in the treatment of various diseases; its American relative, Panax quinquefolium (see photograph), is used in the…

  • wild silk moth (insect)
  • wild spikenard (plant)

    spikenard: …family Asparagaceae, is sometimes called wild spikenard.

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