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  • Williamson, Sonny Boy (American musician)

    Sonny Boy Williamson, American blues vocalist and the first influential harmonica virtuoso, a self-taught player who developed several technical innovations on his instrument. Williamson traveled through Tennessee and Arkansas with mandolinist Yank Rachell and guitarist Sleepy John Estes, working

  • Williamson, William Crawford (English naturalist)

    William Crawford Williamson, English naturalist, a founder of modern paleobotany. Apprenticed to an apothecary in 1832, Williamson, during his spare time, studied natural history and wrote several outstanding papers on fossils. In 1835 he was appointed curator of the museum of the Manchester

  • Williamsoniaceae (plant family)

    Cycadeoidophyta: …Cycadeoidophyta contained two important families: Williamsoniaceae and Cycadeoidaceae (Bennettitaceae). Williamsonia, the best-known genus of its family, had a columnar trunk with frondlike leaves at branch tips; its fossil cones are not well defined. Williamsoniella, a related genus, was shrubby; fossil leaves placed in the genus Nilssoniopteris are believed to belong…

  • Williamsport (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Williamsport, city, seat (1796) of Lycoming county, north-central Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies on the West Branch Susquehanna River, opposite South Williamsport, and in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains, 75 miles (121 km) north of Harrisburg. The area was inhabited by Andastes Indians (a

  • Williamsport Academy (college, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lycoming College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Emphasizing a curriculum in the liberal arts, the college offers bachelor’s degrees in more than 30 fields and several preprofessional

  • Williamsport Dickinson Junior College (college, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lycoming College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Emphasizing a curriculum in the liberal arts, the college offers bachelor’s degrees in more than 30 fields and several preprofessional

  • Williamstown (Massachusetts, United States)

    Williamstown, town (township), Berkshire county, northwestern Massachusetts, U.S., on the Hoosic River 21 miles (34 km) north of Pittsfield. Settled as West Hoosac in 1749, it was incorporated in 1765 and renamed for Colonel Ephraim Williams, killed in the French and Indian War (1754–63), who had

  • Willibald, Christoph, Ritter von Gluck (German composer)

    Christoph Willibald Gluck, German classical composer, best known for his operas, including Orfeo ed Euridice (1762), Alceste (1767), Paride ed Elena (1770), Iphigénie en Aulide (1774), the French version of Orfeo (1774), and Iphigénie en Tauride (1779). He was knighted in 1756. Gluck’s paternal

  • Willibrord of Utrecht (Anglo-Saxon missionary)

    Saint Willibrord, ; feast day November 7), Anglo-Saxon bishop and missionary, apostle of Friesland, and a patron saint of the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The son of the hermit St. Wilgis, Willibrord was sent by him to the Benedictine monastery of Ripon, England, under Abbot St. Wilfrid of York.

  • Willibrord, Saint (Anglo-Saxon missionary)

    Saint Willibrord, ; feast day November 7), Anglo-Saxon bishop and missionary, apostle of Friesland, and a patron saint of the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The son of the hermit St. Wilgis, Willibrord was sent by him to the Benedictine monastery of Ripon, England, under Abbot St. Wilfrid of York.

  • Willich, August von (German revolutionary)

    Karl Marx: Early years in London: …of the revolution,” such as August von Willich, a communist who proposed to hasten the advent of revolution by undertaking direct revolutionary ventures. Such persons, Marx wrote in September 1850, substitute “idealism for materialism” and regard

  • Willie and Joe (characters by Mauldin)

    Bill Mauldin: …Many of his cartoons featured Willie and Joe, a pair of disheveled enlisted men who managed to retain their humanity though caught between the horrors of war and an unrealistic and often fatuous army hierarchy.

  • Willie and the Hand Jive (recording by Otis)

    Johnny Otis: …biggest success was with “Willie and the Hand Jive” in 1958. An artist, pastor, civil rights activist, and author, Otis wrote Listen to the Lambs (1968), an insightful account of the 1965 Watts riots, and Upside Your Head! Rhythm and Blues on Central Avenue (1993). In 1994 Otis was…

  • Willie Horton ad (American political history)

    United States presidential election of 1988: The campaign: …of the campaign, the so-called Willie Horton ad featuring a felon who was let out on a weekend furlough in Massachusetts and subsequently assaulted and raped a woman, was considered racist by many but was actually run by an independent group rather than the Bush campaign.) By mid-August Bush had…

  • Willie Masters’ Lonesome Wife (novella by Gass)

    William H. Gass: His novella Willie Masters’ Lonesome Wife (1968)—a woman’s reflections on her life and on language—makes use of typographical and other visual devices. Gass’s lush, acrobatic style has been criticized by some as being achieved at the expense of characterization, plot, and such conventions as punctuation.

  • Willie the Actor (American criminal)

    Willie Sutton, celebrated American bank robber and prison escapee who earned his nickname “the Actor” because of his talent for disguises, posing as guard, messenger, policeman, diplomat, or window cleaner to fool authorities. Raised in a tough Irish-American district in Brooklyn, he was a veteran

  • Willie’s Lady (ballad)

    ballad: The supernatural: …the dead as revenants; “Willie’s Lady” cannot be delivered of her child because of her wicked mother-in-law’s spells, an enchantment broken by a beneficent household spirit; “The Great Silkie of Sule Skerry” begets upon an “earthly” woman a son, who, on attaining maturity, joins his seal father in the…

  • Willie’s Stash, Vol. 1: December Day (album by Nelson [2014])

    Willie Nelson: …comprised largely new material, and Willie’s Stash, Vol. 1: December Day, the first in a series of releases from his vast catalogue of recordings. The latter record focused on his collaborations with his sister and pianist, Bobbie. God’s Problem Child (2017) and Last Man Standing (2018) are collections of original…

  • Willimantic (Connecticut, United States)

    Willimantic, city and principal community in the town (township) of Windham, Windham county, east-central Connecticut, U.S., at the junction of the Willimantic and Natchaug rivers. The site was settled about 1686 and developed because of the availability of waterpower for gristmills and sawmills.

  • Willingboro (New Jersey, United States)

    Willingboro, township, Burlington county, western New Jersey, U.S. It lies midway between Camden and Trenton (both in New Jersey) on Rancocas Creek, just upstream from the creek’s mouth in the Delaware River. English Quakers settled there about 1677. The community, which originally included what is

  • Willingham, Calder (American writer)

    Calder Willingham, U.S. novelist and screenwriter (born Dec. 22, 1922, Atlanta, Ga.—died Feb. 19, 1995, Laconia, N.H.), was lionized at the age of 24 after the publication of the explicit End as a Man (1947), a graphic and lurid account of life at a southern military school resembling South C

  • Willink (New York, United States)

    East Aurora, village, Erie county, western New York, U.S. It lies 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Buffalo and, oddly enough, 90 miles (145 km) west of Aurora. Settled in 1804, it was incorporated as Willink in 1849 and as East Aurora in 1874. Inspired by the English designer William Morris and his

  • Willis Tower (building, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Willis Tower, skyscraper office building in Chicago, Illinois, located at 233 South Wacker Drive, that is one of the world’s tallest buildings. The Sears Tower opened to tenants in 1973, though construction was not actually completed until 1974. Built for Sears, Roebuck and Company, the structure

  • Willis, Bill (American football player)

    Bill Willis, (William Karnet Willis), American football player (born Oct. 5, 1921, Columbus, Ohio—died Nov. 27, 2007, Columbus), became one of the first African American players in professional football’s modern era when he joined (1946) the Cleveland Browns of the newly formed All-America Football

  • Willis, Bruce (American actor)

    Bruce Willis, American actor best known for his performances in blockbuster action films, particularly the Die Hard series. Willis was born in West Germany, where his father was stationed at an American military base, and the family moved to New Jersey in 1957. After high-school graduation he took

  • Willis, circle of (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: The aorta and its principal branches: …considered as branches of the circle of Willis, which is made up of the two vertebral and the two internal carotid arteries and connecting arteries between them.

  • Willis, Dorothy Ann (American politician)

    Ann Richards, (Dorothy Ann Willis), American politician (born Sept. 1, 1933, Lakeview, Texas—died Sept. 13, 2006, Austin, Texas), served (1991–95) as the feisty governor of Texas and was the first woman to gain the office in her own right. During her tenure Richards, an ardent feminist, appointed a

  • Willis, Ellen Jane (American feminist and journalist)

    Ellen Jane Willis, American feminist and journalist (born Dec. 14, 1941, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 9, 2006, Queens, N.Y.), agitated for women’s rights, especially abortion rights, as the author of numerous articles; as a founder in 1969 of the influential Redstockings, a short-lived radical f

  • Willis, Gordon (American cinematographer)

    Gordon Hugh Willis, American cinematographer (born May 28, 1931, Queens, N.Y.—died May 18, 2014, North Falmouth, Mass.), pioneered a masterful lighting technique that not only illuminated scenes but also provided intriguing shadows in such classic films as Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather

  • Willis, Gordon Hugh (American cinematographer)

    Gordon Hugh Willis, American cinematographer (born May 28, 1931, Queens, N.Y.—died May 18, 2014, North Falmouth, Mass.), pioneered a masterful lighting technique that not only illuminated scenes but also provided intriguing shadows in such classic films as Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather

  • Willis, Grata Payson (American author and newspaper writer)

    Sara Payson Willis Parton, American novelist and newspaper writer, one of the first woman columnists, known for her satiric commentary on contemporary society. Grata Payson Willis early changed her first name to Sara. Her family had a strong literary and journalistic tradition: her father,

  • Willis, Henry (British organ maker)

    Henry Willis, British organ builder, a meticulous craftsman and designer whose splendid instruments, though limited and perhaps decadent in comparison with the 18th-century German classical organ, were perfectly suited to the music played in England during his time. Willis was the son of an organ

  • Willis, John (British stenographer)

    shorthand: History and development of shorthand: …important inventors of shorthand systems: John Willis, who is considered to be the father of modern shorthand; Thomas Shelton, whose system was used by Samuel Pepys to write his famous diary; Jeremiah Rich, who popularized the art by publishing not only his system but also the Psalms and the New…

  • Willis, Thomas (British physician)

    Thomas Willis, British physicians, leader of the English iatrochemists, who attempted to explain the workings of the body from current knowledge of chemical interactions; he is known for his careful studies of the nervous system and of various diseases. An Oxford professor of natural philosophy

  • Willis, Walter Bruce (American actor)

    Bruce Willis, American actor best known for his performances in blockbuster action films, particularly the Die Hard series. Willis was born in West Germany, where his father was stationed at an American military base, and the family moved to New Jersey in 1957. After high-school graduation he took

  • Willis, William Karnet (American football player)

    Bill Willis, (William Karnet Willis), American football player (born Oct. 5, 1921, Columbus, Ohio—died Nov. 27, 2007, Columbus), became one of the first African American players in professional football’s modern era when he joined (1946) the Cleveland Browns of the newly formed All-America Football

  • Williston (North Dakota, United States)

    Williston, city, seat (1891) of Williams county, northwestern North Dakota, U.S. It lies on the Missouri River, 20 miles (30 km) east of the Montana state line and 65 miles (105 km) south of the Canadian border. The Lewis and Clark Expedition passed through the area in 1804–05. Assiniboin, Crow,

  • Williston Basin (region, United States)

    Williston Basin, large sedimentary basin along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in western North Dakota, eastern Montana, and southern Saskatchewan, Can. The basin is characterized by thick sequences of sediments that underlie an area of about 285,000 square kilometres (110,000 square

  • Williwaw (novel by Vidal)

    Gore Vidal: His first novel, Williwaw (1946), which was based on his wartime experiences, received critical praise. His third novel, The City and the Pillar (1948), shocked the public with its direct and unadorned examination of a homosexual main character. In 1974 Vidal explained to The Paris Review why he

  • Willkie, Wendell (American politician)

    Wendell Willkie, U.S. Republican presidential candidate in 1940 who tried unsuccessfully to unseat President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He subsequently became identified with his famous “One World” concept of international cooperation. Willkie earned his law degree from Indiana University in 1916 and

  • Willkie, Wendell L. (American politician)

    Wendell Willkie, U.S. Republican presidential candidate in 1940 who tried unsuccessfully to unseat President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He subsequently became identified with his famous “One World” concept of international cooperation. Willkie earned his law degree from Indiana University in 1916 and

  • Willkie, Wendell Lewis (American politician)

    Wendell Willkie, U.S. Republican presidential candidate in 1940 who tried unsuccessfully to unseat President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He subsequently became identified with his famous “One World” concept of international cooperation. Willkie earned his law degree from Indiana University in 1916 and

  • Willmann, Michael (Bohemian painter)

    Western painting: Central Europe: Michael Willmann, originally from K?nigsberg (modern Kaliningrad) on the southeastern Baltic coast, developed a highly charged, emotional Baroque style, based on Rubens, at Lubi?? (modern Dorf Leubus, northwest of Wroc?aw) from 1661 to 1700 and at Prague after 1700. In Karel ?kréta ?otnovosky, Bohemia possessed…

  • Willmar (Minnesota, United States)

    Willmar, city, seat (1871) of Kandiyohi county, southwest-central Minnesota, U.S. It is situated on Foot and Willmar lakes, in a lake region about 60 miles (95 km) southwest of St. Cloud. Settlers began arriving in the area in 1856, but the community was later deserted because of the Sioux uprising

  • Willmes press (technology)

    wine: Juice separation: The Willmes press, widely employed for white musts, consists of a perforated cylinder containing an inflatable tube. The crushed grapes are introduced into the cylinder, and the tube is inflated, pressing the grapes against the rotating cylinder sides and forcing the juice out through the perforations.…

  • Willmore City (California, United States)

    Long Beach, city, port, Los Angeles county, California, U.S. Long Beach lies on San Pedro Bay, 22 miles (35 km) south of Los Angeles, and surrounds the independent city of Signal Hill. The area was originally an Indian trading camp. In 1542 Spanish explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo anchored off the

  • Willmore, Alfred Lee (actor, scenic designer, and playwright)

    Micheál MacLiammóir, English-born actor, scenic designer, and playwright whose nearly 300 productions in Gaelic and English at the Gate Theatre in Dublin enriched the Irish Renaissance by internationalizing the generally parochial Irish theatre. Willmore made his debut on the London stage in 1911

  • Willmott, Peter (British sociologist)

    Peter Willmott, British sociologist (born Sept. 18, 1923, Oxford, Eng.—died April 8, 2000, London, Eng.), examined patterns of kinship and the changing networks of familial relationships found in contemporary urban Great Britain and published a series of books—many of them prepared with his f

  • Willochra Plain (region, Australia)

    Australia: The Western Plateau: The Willochra Plain occupies an elongate intermontane basin excavated from a major upwarped structure and achieved through the erosion of some 20,000 feet (6,000 metres) of sediments. There are remnants of old land surfaces of low relief, and, in the north, extremely rugged relief developed on…

  • Willoughby of Parham, Francis Willoughby, 5th Baron (governor of Barbados)

    Francis Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby, governor of Barbados who in 1651 brought about the settlement of Suriname (then nominally Spanish territory) by immigrants from Caribbean and other South American colonies. Originally a supporter of Parliament in the English Civil War, he joined the

  • Willoughby, Bob (American photographer)

    Bob Willoughby, (Robert Hanley Willoughby), American photographer (born June 30, 1927, Los Angeles, Calif.—died Dec. 18, 2009, Vence, France), specialized in creating portraits that captured Hollywood stars in unguarded moments, especially when they were involved in film rehearsals or relaxing

  • Willoughby, Hugh (English explorer)

    Richard Chancellor: …appointed pilot general of Sir Hugh Willoughby’s expedition in search of a northeast passage from England to China. The three-vessel fleet was to rendezvous at Vard?, Nor., but because of stormy weather Chancellor’s was the only ship to make it to Vard?. Willoughby and his crew died in Lapland, but…

  • willow (plant genus)

    Willow, shrubs and trees of the genus Salix, family Salicaceae, mostly native to north temperate areas and valued for ornament, shade, erosion control, and timber. Salicin, source of salicylic acid used in pain relievers, is derived from certain willows. All species have alternate, usually narrow

  • willow bellflower (plant)

    bellflower: Peach-leaved bellflower (C. persicifolia), found in Eurasian woodlands and meadows, produces slender-stemmed spikes, 30 to 90 cm (12 to 35 inches) tall, of long-stalked outward-facing bells. Rampion (C. rapunculus) is a Eurasian and North African biennial grown for its turniplike roots and leaves, which are…

  • willow family (plant family)

    Malpighiales: The Salicaceae group: Salicaceae, Violaceae, Achariaceae, Malesherbiaceae, Turneraceae, Passifloraceae, and Lacistemataceae form a related group. Glands on the leaves are common; there are often three carpels; ovules are borne on the walls of the ovary; and the reserve endosperm in the seeds is persistent and oily.

  • willow grouse (bird)

    ptarmigan: Also distributed circumpolarly is the willow ptarmigan, or willow grouse (L. lagopus), a more northerly bird of lowlands. On Rocky Mountain tundra south to New Mexico is the white-tailed ptarmigan.

  • willow herb (plant genus)

    Epilobium, genus of about 200 plants, in the evening primrose family (Onagraceae), native to most temperate regions. It includes fireweed (q.v.; species E. angustifolium), which rapidly covers newly burned areas. The young parts of some species can be cooked and eaten as potherbs. The plants are

  • willow oak (tree species, Quercus phellos)

    Willow oak, any of several species of North American ornamental and timber trees belonging to the red oak group of the genus Quercus, in the beech family (Fagaceae), which have willowlike leaves. Specifically, willow oak refers to Quercus phellos, native to poorly drained areas of the Atlantic and

  • Willow Palisade (wall, China)

    Willow Palisade, ditch and embankment built across parts of southern Northeast China (historically called Manchuria) and planted with willows during the early Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12). Possibly from as early as 1000 bce, the Chinese (Han) inhabiting Manchuria primarily occupied a triangular area

  • Willow pattern (pottery)

    Willow pattern, landscape design developed by Thomas Turner at Caughley, Shropshire, Eng., in 1779 in imitation of the Chinese. Its classic components are a weeping willow, pagoda-like structures, three men on a quaint bridge, and a pair of swallows, and the usual colour scheme is blue on white,

  • willow ptarmigan (bird)

    ptarmigan: Also distributed circumpolarly is the willow ptarmigan, or willow grouse (L. lagopus), a more northerly bird of lowlands. On Rocky Mountain tundra south to New Mexico is the white-tailed ptarmigan.

  • Willow Springs (New Mexico, United States)

    Raton, city, seat (1897) of Colfax county, northeastern New Mexico, U.S. It lies at the southern end of Raton Pass (7,834 feet [2,388 metres] above sea level) in the Sangre de Cristo Range, near the Colorado state line. Located on the old Santa Fe Trail and settled in 1871, it was used as a

  • willow tit (bird)

    Paridae: …Europe there is the similar willow tit (P. montanus), immortalized by Gilbert and Sullivan.

  • Willow Tree, The (opera by Cadman)

    Charles Wakefield Cadman: …Witch of Salem (1926) and The Willow Tree (1931), the first American opera written for radio; the American Suite for strings; the Thunderbird Suite for piano; and the cantata The Vision of Sir Launfal.

  • willowleaf podocarpus (tree)

    yellowwood: andinus) and willowleaf podocarpus, or ma?ío (P. salignus), of the Chilean Andes; and the yacca (P. coriaceus) of the West Indies.

  • willowmore cedar (tree)

    African cypress: Willowmore cedar (W. schwarzii), a tree from the Cape Province region of South Africa, is usually gnarled and about 15 metres (49 feet) tall under unfavourable growing conditions; it may reach a height of 30 metres (98 feet) and have a graceful shape in less…

  • Wills, Bob (American musician)

    Bob Wills, American bandleader, fiddler, singer, and songwriter whose Texas Playboys popularized western swing music in the 1930s and ’40s. Taught to play the mandolin and fiddle by his father and other relatives, Wills began performing in country string bands in Texas in the late 1920s. In 1933 he

  • Wills, Chill (American actor and singer)

    The Alamo: …backlash mounted after Oscar nominee Chill Wills implied that voting for anyone else would be anti-American. In the end, the film won two Academy Awards, for sound and cinematography.

  • Wills, Garry (American historian, journalist, and author)

    Garry Wills, American historian, journalist, and author of provocative books on Roman Catholicism, history, and politics. Wills grew up in Wisconsin and Michigan, where he spent his childhood immersed in books—to the chagrin of his father, an appliance salesman and boxing coach. Wills studied

  • Wills, Helen (American tennis player)

    Helen Wills, outstanding American tennis player who was the top female competitor in the world for eight years (1927–33 and 1935). Wills began playing tennis when she was 13 and won her first major title, the U.S. girls’ championship, in 1921. She repeated as national girls’ champion in 1922 and

  • Wills, Helen Newington (American tennis player)

    Helen Wills, outstanding American tennis player who was the top female competitor in the world for eight years (1927–33 and 1935). Wills began playing tennis when she was 13 and won her first major title, the U.S. girls’ championship, in 1921. She repeated as national girls’ champion in 1922 and

  • Wills, James Robert (American musician)

    Bob Wills, American bandleader, fiddler, singer, and songwriter whose Texas Playboys popularized western swing music in the 1930s and ’40s. Taught to play the mandolin and fiddle by his father and other relatives, Wills began performing in country string bands in Texas in the late 1920s. In 1933 he

  • Wills, Maurice Morning (American baseball player)

    Maury Wills, American professional baseball player and manager, who set base-stealing records in his playing career. Wills was a star football quarterback and baseball pitcher for Cardozo High School (Washington, D.C.) and was signed to a contract by the National League (NL) Brooklyn (later Los

  • Wills, Maury (American baseball player)

    Maury Wills, American professional baseball player and manager, who set base-stealing records in his playing career. Wills was a star football quarterback and baseball pitcher for Cardozo High School (Washington, D.C.) and was signed to a contract by the National League (NL) Brooklyn (later Los

  • Wills, Statute of (English history)

    inheritance: Historical development: …by the enactment of the Statute of Wills, to open the way for true testamentary disposition of land. Restrictions limiting devises of those lands of which ownership was connected with the duty of rendering military service were abolished at the time of the Restoration by the Military Tenures Act of…

  • Wills, Thomas Wentworth (Australian cricketer)

    Australian rules football: Origins: Concerned about off-season fitness, cricketer Thomas Wentworth Wills (1835–80), who was born in Australia but educated at Rugby School in England—where he captained the cricket team and excelled in football—believed that a football club should be formed to keep his teammates fit during winter. The Melbourne Cricket Club agreed with…

  • Wills, William John (Australian explorer)

    Robert O'Hara Burke: …by his second in command, William John Wills, and by Charles Gray and John King. The four reached northern Australia in February 1861 but could not penetrate the swamps and jungle scrub that lay between them and the Gulf of Carpentaria.

  • Willst?tter, Richard (German chemist)

    Richard Willst?tter, German chemist whose study of the structure of chlorophyll and other plant pigments won him the 1915 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Willst?tter obtained his doctorate from the University of Munich (1894) for work on the structure of cocaine. While serving as an assistant to Adolf

  • Willughby, Francis (English naturalist)

    John Ray: Life: …and Cornwall with the naturalist Francis Willughby was a turning point in his life. Willughby and Ray agreed to undertake a study of the complete natural history of living things, with Ray responsible for the plant kingdom and Willughby the animal.

  • Willumsen, Dorit (Danish author)

    Danish literature: Postwar literary trends: The language of Dorrit Willumsen, another modernist focusing on the question of identity in a materialistic society, reflects the emptiness of the lives of her female characters. In the 1980s she turned to the semidocumentary historical novel with Marie: en roman om Madame Tussaud’s liv (1983; Marie) and…

  • Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (film by Stuart [1971])

    Jack Albertson: Albertson played Grandpa Joe in Willy Wonka &amp; the Chocolate Factory (1971) and Manny Rosen in the popular disaster movie The Poseidon Adventure (1972). He also had guest roles in dozens of TV series and variety shows as well as several made-for-television movies. He showed his versatility as an actor…

  • Wilm, Alfred (German chemist)

    metallurgy: Metallography: …discovery of age hardening by Alfred Wilm in Berlin about 1906 yielded a material that was twice as strong with only a small change in weight. In Wilm’s process, a solute such as magnesium or copper is trapped in supersaturated solid solution, without being allowed to precipitate out, by quenching…

  • Wilmarth, Lemuel (American painter)

    Art Students League: …first president was American painter Lemuel Wilmarth, who had studied under the French sculptor and painter Jean-Léon Gér?me at the école des Beaux-Arts. Wilmarth had been the director of the National Academy of Design beginning in 1870. He took a two-year hiatus to head the Art Students League (1875–77) before…

  • Wilmette (Illinois, United States)

    Wilmette, village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. Lying on Lake Michigan, it is a primarily residential suburb of Chicago, about 15 miles (24 km) north of downtown. Illinois and later Potawatomi Indians were early inhabitants of the area, which was visited by the French explorer Jacques

  • Wilmette (United States Naval ship)

    Eastland disaster: …entered service as the USS Wilmette. However, World War I ended before it saw any combat. The Wilmette was then used as a training vessel until 1945, when it was struck from the navy’s registry. It was sold for scrap the following year. The documentary Eastland: Chicago’s Deadliest Day was…

  • Wilmette, Adolphe (French cartoonist)

    comic strip: The 19th century: …the heirs to Busch were Adolphe Willette and Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, both pioneers in Le Chat Noir (“The Black Cat”)—house magazine of the world’s first cabaret—of the wordless, or “silent,” strip (first employed by Busch). Willette created a black-clad Pierrot, a volatile, poetic, and amoral trickster (1882–84), and Steinlen specialized in…

  • Wilmington (Delaware, United States)

    Wilmington, largest city in Delaware, U.S., and seat of New Castle county at the influx of the Christina River and Brandywine Creek into the Delaware River. It is the state’s industrial, financial, and commercial centre and main port. The oldest permanent European settlement in the Delaware River

  • Wilmington (North Carolina, United States)

    Wilmington, city, seat of New Hanover county, southeastern North Carolina, U.S. It is the state’s chief seaport and lies on the Cape Fear River, about 30 miles (48 km) above its mouth. Settled in the early 1730s and called New Carthage and then New Liverpool, it was incorporated (1740) as New Town

  • Wilmington Ten (United States history)

    Wilmington Ten, 10 civil rights activists who were falsely convicted and incarcerated for nearly a decade following a 1971 riot in Wilmington, North Carolina, over school desegregation. Wrongfully convicted of arson and conspiracy, the Wilmington Ten—eight African American high-school students, an

  • Wilmington, Baron (English noble)

    Spencer Compton, earl of Wilmington, British politician, favourite of King George II and nominal prime minister of Great Britain from February 1742 to July 1743. Third son of James Spencer, 3rd earl of Northampton, he first entered Parliament in 1698; in 1715 he became speaker of the House of

  • Wilmington, Spencer Compton, earl of, Viscount Pevensey (English noble)

    Spencer Compton, earl of Wilmington, British politician, favourite of King George II and nominal prime minister of Great Britain from February 1742 to July 1743. Third son of James Spencer, 3rd earl of Northampton, he first entered Parliament in 1698; in 1715 he became speaker of the House of

  • Wilmot Proviso (United States history)

    Wilmot Proviso, in U.S. history, important congressional proposal in the 1840s to prohibit the extension of slavery into the territories, a basic plank upon which the Republican Party was subsequently built. Soon after the Mexican War, Pres. James K. Polk asked Congress for $2,000,000 to negotiate

  • Wilmot River (river, Tasmania, Australia)

    Wilmot River, river in northern Tasmania, Australia. It rises on the island’s Central Plateau and plunges over the plateau’s edge to flow north for approximately 30 miles (48 km) to join the River Forth. It is an important part of the Mersey Forth hydroelectric power

  • Wilmot, David (American politician)

    Free-Soil Party: …within the national government, Representative David Wilmot of Pennsylvania in 1846 introduced into Congress his famous Wilmot Proviso, calling for the prohibition of slavery in the vast southwestern lands that had been newly acquired from Mexico. The Wilmot concept, which failed in Congress, was a direct ideological antecedent to the…

  • Wilmot, Frank Leslie Thompson (Australian poet)

    Furnley Maurice, Australian poet, best known for his book To God: From the Warring Nations (1917), a powerful indictment of the waste, cruelty, and stupidity of war. He was also the author of lyrics, satirical verses, and essays. At age 14 Wilmot worked in a Melbourne bookshop, rising to the

  • Wilmot, John (English poet)

    John Wilmot, 2nd earl of Rochester, court wit and poet who helped establish English satiric poetry. Wilmot succeeded his father to the earldom in 1658, and he received his M.A. at Oxford in 1661. Charles II, probably out of gratitude to the 1st earl, who had helped him to escape after the Battle of

  • Wilms’ tumour

    Nephroblastoma, malignant renal (kidney) tumour of early childhood. In 75 percent of the cases, the tumour grows before the age of five; about two-thirds of the instances are apparent by two years of age. The tumour grows rapidly and can approach the weight of the rest of the body. It rarely

  • Wilmut, Sir Ian (British biologist)

    Sir Ian Wilmut, British developmental biologist who was the first to use nuclear transfer of differentiated adult cells to generate a mammalian clone, a Finn Dorset sheep named Dolly, born in 1996. Wilmut was raised in Coventry, a town in the historic English county of Warwickshire, and he attended

  • Wilno (national capital, Lithuania)

    Vilnius, city, capital of Lithuania, at the confluence of the Neris (Russian Viliya) and Vilnia rivers. A settlement existed on the site in the 10th century, and the first documentary reference to it dates from 1128. In 1323 the town became capital of Lithuania under Grand Duke Gediminas; it was

  • Wilno dispute (European history)

    Vilnius dispute, post-World War I conflict between Poland and Lithuania over possession of the city of Vilnius (Wilno) and its surrounding region. Although the new Lithuanian government established itself at Vilnius in late 1918, it evacuated the city when Soviet forces moved in on January 5, 1919.

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