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  • Woodruff, Hale Aspacio (American painter, draftsman, printer, and educator)

    Hale Woodruff, American painter, draftsman, printer, and educator who is probably best known for his murals, especially the Amistad mutiny murals (1939) at the Savery Library at Talladega College in Alabama. The murals tell the story of the mutiny aboard the slave ship Amistad, the trial of the

  • Woodruff, John Youie (American track and field athlete)

    John Youie Woodruff, American track and field athlete (born July 5, 1915, Connellsville, Pa.—died Oct. 30, 2007, Fountain Hills, Ariz.), won gold in the 800-m race at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games in a come-from-behind (he was running last) finish that established him as a world-class runner. His

  • Woodruff, Robert Winship (American businessman)

    The Coca-Cola Company: His son, Robert Winship Woodruff, guided the company as president and chairman for more than three decades (1923–55).

  • Woodruff, Wilford (American religious leader)

    Wilford Woodruff, fourth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), who issued the proclamation that relinquished the church practice of polygyny, or polygamy as it was popularly called. Converted in 1833, Woodruff joined the Mormons in Kirtland, Ohio, moved with them

  • woods forget-me-not (plant)

    forget-me-not: The woods forget-me-not (M. sylvatica), like most other Myosotis, changes colour from pink to blue as the tubular, flaring, five-lobed flower matures. The water forget-me-not (M. scorpioides) is shorter and has weaker stems; it grows in marshlands but is otherwise similar. Both are perennial and occur…

  • Woods Hole (Massachusetts, United States)

    Woods Hole, unincorporated village in Falmouth town (township), Barnstable county, southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies at the southwestern end of Cape Cod. Woods Hole is the cape’s principal port and a point of departure for the islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. Within the village

  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (research centre, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, United States)

    Marine Biological Laboratory: The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), an offshoot of the laboratory established in 1930, is maintained by a permanent staff of more than 850. WHOI has supported hundreds of research projects and activities, including studies of marine life, the chemical composition of oceans, global climate changes,…

  • Woods Near Oele (work by Mondrian)

    Piet Mondrian: Influence of Post-Impressionists and Luminists: By the time he painted Woods near Oele in 1908, new values began to appear in his work, including a linear movement that was somewhat reminiscent of the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch and a colour scheme—based on hues of yellow, orange, blue, violet, and red—that was suggestive of the palette…

  • Woods, Abraham Lincoln, Jr. (American civil rights activist)

    Abraham Lincoln Woods, Jr., American civil rights activist (born Oct. 7, 1928, Birmingham, Ala.—died Nov. 7, 2008, Birmingham), led the protesters who staged (1963) the first sit-ins at a whites-only lunch counter in downtown Birmingham, a landmark event in the fight for civil rights; authorities

  • woods, cock of the (bird)

    Capercaillie, European game bird of the grouse family. See

  • Woods, Don (American electronic games programmer)

    electronic game: Interactive fiction: In 1977 Don Woods of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory came across a copy of the source code for Crowther’s “ADVENT” program and carefully revised the game, adding new elements that increased its popularity. This version and its variants were widely distributed around the network of connected…

  • Woods, Donald (South African journalist)

    Donald Woods, South African journalist and antiapartheid campaigner (born Dec. 15, 1933, Elliotdale, S.Af.—died Aug. 19, 2001, Sutton, Surrey, Eng.), captured the attention of the world in 1977 with an exposé on the death while in police custody of his friend Steve Biko, a prominent young black a

  • Woods, Eldrick (American golfer)

    Tiger Woods, American golfer who enjoyed one of the greatest amateur careers in the history of the game and became the dominant player on the professional circuit in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In 1997 Woods became the first golfer of either African American or Asian descent to win the Masters

  • Woods, Gordon L. (American equine reproduction specialist)

    Gordon L. Woods, American equine reproduction specialist who led research efforts resulting in the generation of the first equine clone—a mule named Idaho Gem, born in 2003. Woods also was known for his pioneering research into the use of equines as models for better understanding of human disease.

  • Woods, Helen (British author)

    Anna Kavan, British novelist and short-story writer known for her semiautobiographical surreal fiction dealing with the themes of mental breakdown and self-destruction. She was born into a wealthy family and traveled widely as a child. Under the name Helen Ferguson she wrote six novels, most

  • woods, hen of the (fungus)

    Polyporales: The edible hen of the woods (P. frondosus), which grows on old trees and stumps, produces a cluster of grayish mushrooms with two or three caps on a stalk; the undersides of the caps are porous. The sulfur mushroom, P. (Laetiporus) sulphureus, a common shelflike fungus that…

  • Woods, Lake of the (lake, North America)

    Lake of the Woods, scenic lake astride the Canadian–United States boundary where the provinces of Ontario and Manitoba and the state of Minnesota meet. Relatively shallow and irregular in shape, it is 70 miles (110 km) long and up to 60 miles (95 km) wide and has an area of 1,727 square miles

  • Woods, Phil (American musician)

    Phil Woods, (Philip Wells Woods), American jazz musician (born Nov. 2, 1931, Springfield, Mass.—died Sept. 29, 2015, East Stroudsburg, Pa.), played bright-sounding, rhythmically complex, and technically sophisticated bebop on his alto saxophone throughout a six-decade-long career. At the age of 12,

  • Woods, Philip Wells (American musician)

    Phil Woods, (Philip Wells Woods), American jazz musician (born Nov. 2, 1931, Springfield, Mass.—died Sept. 29, 2015, East Stroudsburg, Pa.), played bright-sounding, rhythmically complex, and technically sophisticated bebop on his alto saxophone throughout a six-decade-long career. At the age of 12,

  • Woods, Robert Carr (newspaper publisher)

    The Straits Times: …as a single-sheet weekly by Robert Carr Woods to provide commercial information needed by Singapore’s bustling port community. The paper became a daily in 1858. Its facilities were destroyed by fire in 1869, but the paper did not miss an issue. Under Alexander William Still, editor in the early 1900s,…

  • Woods, Rose Mary (American secretary)

    Rose Mary Woods, American personality (born Dec. 26, 1917, Sebring, Ohio—died Jan. 22, 2005, Alliance, Ohio), served as personal secretary for Richard M. Nixon from 1951, when he entered the U.S. Senate, until some time after he resigned the presidency in 1974 because of the Watergate scandal. S

  • Woods, The (album by Sleater-Kinney)

    Sleater-Kinney: …most radical departure, however, was The Woods (2005). Working with noted producer Dave Fridmann, the band displayed a new sense of open-ended improvisation, along with its most dense and bombastic arrangements. Having earned a reputation that far outpaced its moderate commercial success, Sleater-Kinney disbanded at the conclusion of its 2006…

  • Woods, Tiger (American golfer)

    Tiger Woods, American golfer who enjoyed one of the greatest amateur careers in the history of the game and became the dominant player on the professional circuit in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In 1997 Woods became the first golfer of either African American or Asian descent to win the Masters

  • Woods, William A. (United States jurist)

    In re Debs: The trial of Eugene V. Debs: circuit court judge William A. Woods ruled that Debs and the others were in contempt of court for violating the original injunction issued on July 2. The long opinion written by Woods displayed his antiunion views. He ordered the defendants to serve three to six months in the…

  • Woods, William B. (United States jurist)

    William B. Woods, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1880–87). After being admitted to the bar in 1847, Woods entered private practice, in which he remained until the outbreak of the American Civil War. In the prewar years he served first as mayor of Newark and then as a state

  • Woods, William Burnham (United States jurist)

    William B. Woods, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1880–87). After being admitted to the bar in 1847, Woods entered private practice, in which he remained until the outbreak of the American Civil War. In the prewar years he served first as mayor of Newark and then as a state

  • Woodsiaceae (plant family)

    Woodsiaceae, the cliff fern family, containing 15 genera and about 700 species, in the division Pteridophyta. Members of Woodsiaceae are distributed nearly worldwide, but species are most diverse in temperate regions and in mountainous tropical areas. Most species are terrestrial in forested

  • Woodson, Carter G. (American historian)

    Carter G. Woodson, American historian who first opened the long-neglected field of black studies to scholars and also popularized the field in the schools and colleges of black people. To focus attention on black contributions to civilization, he founded (1926) Negro History Week. Of a poor family,

  • Woodson, Carter Godwin (American historian)

    Carter G. Woodson, American historian who first opened the long-neglected field of black studies to scholars and also popularized the field in the schools and colleges of black people. To focus attention on black contributions to civilization, he founded (1926) Negro History Week. Of a poor family,

  • Woodson, Rod (American football player)

    Baltimore Ravens: …end Shannon Sharpe, and cornerback Rod Woodson. Over the remainder of the decade, the Ravens remained competitive, qualifying for the playoffs in six of the 10 seasons from 2001 to 2010—which included a loss to the rival Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC championship game following the 2008 season—and featuring a…

  • Woodstock (film by Wadleigh [1970])

    Rock and film: …than just a concert film, Woodstock (1970) brilliantly chronicled “three days of peace, music…and love” and remains a monument to hippie culture. In stark contrast, a sense of dread permeates Gimme Shelter (1970), the Maysles brothers’ disturbing documentary of the Rolling Stones’ concert at the Altamont Speedway in California, which…

  • Woodstock (American music festival [1969])

    Woodstock, the most famous of the 1960s rock festivals, held on a farm property in Bethel, New York, August 15–18, 1969. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was organized by four inexperienced promoters who nonetheless signed a who’s who of current rock acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Sly and the Family

  • Woodstock (Ontario, Canada)

    Woodstock, city, seat of Oxford county, southeastern Ontario, Canada, on the Thames River. The first settler was Zacharius Burtch, who built a log cabin (1798) on a hill overlooking the town site. The actual founder was Rear Admiral Henry Vansittart of the Royal Navy, who in 1834 formed the nucleus

  • Woodstock (cartoon character)

    Charlie Brown: …and a little yellow bird, Woodstock—were featured in many animated television specials, beginning with A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965); in an award-winning, highly successful, long-running live-action stage musical, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (1967); and in many cartoon films, including A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969) and The Peanuts…

  • Woodstock (New York, United States)

    Woodstock, unincorporated village and town (township) in Ulster county, southeastern New York, U.S., lying in the foothills of the southern Catskills near the Ashokan Reservoir. Located 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Kingston, the village is a year-round resort and also a noted artists’ colony,

  • Woodstock Music and Art Fair, The (American music festival [1969])

    Woodstock, the most famous of the 1960s rock festivals, held on a farm property in Bethel, New York, August 15–18, 1969. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was organized by four inexperienced promoters who nonetheless signed a who’s who of current rock acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Sly and the Family

  • Woodstock Remembered: The 40th Anniversary

    A free concert to mark the 40th anniversary of a cultural and musical phenomenon—the legendary Rock festival known as Woodstock—being organized by Michael Lang, one of the original promoters in 1969, to take place in Brooklyn, N.Y., in August 2009 was canceled just days prior to the event but an

  • Woodstock, Thomas of (English noble)

    Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, powerful opponent of King Richard II of England (ruled 1377–99). The seventh son of King Edward III (ruled 1327–77), he was created Duke of Gloucester in 1385 and soon became the leader of a party opposed to Richard II, his young nephew. In 1386 Gloucester

  • Woodstock, William Henry Cavendish Bentinck, Viscount (prime minister of Great Britain)

    William Henry Cavendish Bentinck, 3rd duke of Portland, British prime minister from April 2 to Dec. 19, 1783, and from March 31, 1807, to Oct. 4, 1809; on both occasions he was merely the nominal head of a government controlled by stronger political leaders. The eldest son of William, 2nd Duke of

  • woodswallow (bird genus)

    Woodswallow, (genus Artamus), any of about 16 species of songbirds constituting the family Artamidae (order Passeriformes). Woodswallows are found from eastern India, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines southward to Australia and Tasmania. They resemble swallows in wing shape and aerial feeding

  • Woodville, Elizabeth (queen of England)

    Elizabeth Woodville, wife of King Edward IV of England. After Edward’s death popular dislike of her and her court facilitated the usurpation of power by Richard, duke of Gloucester (King Richard III). A woman of great beauty, she was already a widow with two sons when Edward IV married her in May

  • Woodville, William (British physician)

    Edward Jenner: …the doctors George Pearson and William Woodville. Difficulties arose, some of them quite unpleasant; Pearson tried to take credit away from Jenner, and Woodville, a physician in a smallpox hospital, contaminated the cowpox matter with smallpox virus. Vaccination rapidly proved its value, however, and Jenner became intensely active promoting it.…

  • woodwarbler (bird)

    Wood warbler, any of the species in the songbird family Parulidae. Wood warblers are New World birds, distinct from the true warblers of the Old World, which represent a taxonomically diverse group. Because most wood warblers are brightly coloured and active, they are known as the “butterflies of

  • Woodward (Oklahoma, United States)

    Woodward, city, seat (1907) of Woodward county, northwestern Oklahoma, U.S. The city lies along the North Canadian River on the Western Trail, a northbound cattle route. It was originally a train stop, settled in 1893 when the Cherokee Strip was opened for homesteading, and was probably named for

  • Woodward’s rules (chemistry)

    Roald Hoffmann: …of statements now called the Woodward-Hoffmann rules, accounts for the failure of certain cyclic compounds to form from apparently appropriate starting materials, though others are readily produced; it also clarifies the geometric arrangement of the atoms in the products formed when the rings in cyclic compounds are broken.

  • Woodward’s wallaroo (marsupial)

    kangaroo: Descriptions of selected species: …Woodward’s, or black, wallaroo (M. bernardus).

  • Woodward, Arthur Smith (British paleontologist)

    Piltdown man: Dawson took the specimens to Arthur Smith Woodward, keeper of the British Museum’s paleontology department, who announced the find at a meeting of the Geological Society of London on December 18, 1912. Woodward claimed that the fossils represented a previously unknown species of extinct hominin (Eoanthropus dawsoni) that could be…

  • Woodward, Bob (American journalist and author)

    Bob Woodward, American journalist and author who, with Carl Bernstein, earned a Pulitzer Prize for The Washington Post in 1973 for his investigative reporting on the Watergate scandal. Woodward grew up in Wheaton, a suburb of Chicago, where his father was a prominent jurist. It was thought that he

  • Woodward, C. Vann (American historian and educator)

    C. Vann Woodward, American historian and educator who became the leading interpreter of the post-Civil War history of the American South. Woodward graduated from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1930, took a master’s degree from Columbia University in 1932, and received a Ph.D. from the

  • Woodward, Comer Vann (American historian and educator)

    C. Vann Woodward, American historian and educator who became the leading interpreter of the post-Civil War history of the American South. Woodward graduated from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1930, took a master’s degree from Columbia University in 1932, and received a Ph.D. from the

  • Woodward, Edward (British actor)

    Edward Woodward, (Edward Albert Arthur Woodward), British actor (born June 1, 1930, Croydon, Surrey, Eng.—died Nov. 16, 2009, Truro, Cornwall, Eng.), received five Emmy Award nominations for his portrayal of a disillusioned intelligence agent turned good-guy vigilante in the American television

  • Woodward, Edward Albert Arthur (British actor)

    Edward Woodward, (Edward Albert Arthur Woodward), British actor (born June 1, 1930, Croydon, Surrey, Eng.—died Nov. 16, 2009, Truro, Cornwall, Eng.), received five Emmy Award nominations for his portrayal of a disillusioned intelligence agent turned good-guy vigilante in the American television

  • Woodward, Emmeline Blanche (American religious leader and feminist)

    Emmeline Blanche Woodward Wells, American religious leader and feminist who made use of her editorship of the Mormon publication Woman’s Exponent to campaign energetically for woman suffrage. Emmeline Woodward followed her widowed mother in converting to Mormonism in 1842. She moved with her first

  • Woodward, Joan (British management scholar)

    organizational analysis: Special topics: … (1965), the English management scholar Joan Woodward argued that an organization’s methods are determined by the class of “core technologies” that characterize its work: small batch (where the work must be adapted to the peculiarities of the current batch—e.g., emergency medical care and residential construction), large batch (such as automobile…

  • Woodward, Joanne (American actress)

    Joanne Woodward, American actress best known for her role in The Three Faces of Eve (1957) and for her 50-year marriage to actor Paul Newman. Woodward, who was naturally beautiful and poised, was highly respected and much lauded for her convincing portrayals in film, on television, and onstage. Her

  • Woodward, Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier (American actress)

    Joanne Woodward, American actress best known for her role in The Three Faces of Eve (1957) and for her 50-year marriage to actor Paul Newman. Woodward, who was naturally beautiful and poised, was highly respected and much lauded for her convincing portrayals in film, on television, and onstage. Her

  • Woodward, John (English scientist)

    Earth sciences: The rise of subterranean water: …was resurrected in 1695 in John Woodward’s Essay Towards a Natural History of the Earth and Terrestrial Bodies.

  • Woodward, John (British admiral)

    Sir John Forster Woodward, (“Sandy”), British admiral (born May 1, 1932, Penzance, Cornwall, Eng.—died Aug. 4, 2013, Bosham, West Sussex, Eng.), commanded the British Royal Navy fleet during the Falkland Islands War. After graduating from Britannia Royal Naval College in Dartmouth, Woodward served

  • Woodward, Patti (American actress)

    The Devil and Daniel Webster: Cast: Assorted References

  • Woodward, R. B. (American chemist)

    Robert Burns Woodward, American chemist best known for his syntheses of complex organic substances, including cholesterol and cortisone (1951), strychnine (1954), and vitamin B12 (1971). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1965, “for his outstanding achievements in the art of organic

  • Woodward, Robert Burns (American chemist)

    Robert Burns Woodward, American chemist best known for his syntheses of complex organic substances, including cholesterol and cortisone (1951), strychnine (1954), and vitamin B12 (1971). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1965, “for his outstanding achievements in the art of organic

  • Woodward, Robert Upshur (American journalist and author)

    Bob Woodward, American journalist and author who, with Carl Bernstein, earned a Pulitzer Prize for The Washington Post in 1973 for his investigative reporting on the Watergate scandal. Woodward grew up in Wheaton, a suburb of Chicago, where his father was a prominent jurist. It was thought that he

  • Woodward, Thomas John (Welsh-born singer)

    Tom Jones, Welsh-born singer with broad musical appeal who first came to fame as a sex symbol with a fantastic voice and raucous stage presence. He is known best for his songs “It’s Not Unusual,” “What’s New, Pussycat?,” “Green, Green Grass of Home,” and “Delilah” from the 1960s, but he enjoyed a

  • Woodward, William (American banker and racehorse owner)

    William Woodward, American banker and an influential breeder, owner, and racer of horses. Woodward was educated at Groton School, Groton, Mass., and Harvard College and, upon graduation from Harvard Law School in 1901, became secretary to Joseph H. Choate, U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James.

  • Woodward, William H. (American college secretary)

    Dartmouth College case: The trustees then sued William H. Woodward, college secretary and ally of Wheelock, but lost in the state courts.

  • Woodward–Hoffmann rules (chemistry)

    Roald Hoffmann: …of statements now called the Woodward-Hoffmann rules, accounts for the failure of certain cyclic compounds to form from apparently appropriate starting materials, though others are readily produced; it also clarifies the geometric arrangement of the atoms in the products formed when the rings in cyclic compounds are broken.

  • Woodwardia (fern genus)

    Blechnaceae: …fern), Doodia (hacksaw fern), and Woodwardia (chain fern) are cultivated as ornamentals in gardens, greenhouses, conservatories, and homes.

  • woodwind (musical instrument)

    Woodwind, any of a group of wind musical instruments, composed of the flutes and reed pipes (i.e., clarinet, oboe, bassoon, and saxophone). Both groups were traditionally made of wood, but now they may also be constructed of metal. Woodwinds are distinguished from other wind instruments by the

  • Woodwind Sonatas (works by Saint-Sa?ns)

    Woodwind Sonatas, group of three sonatas for piano and a woodwind instrument composed by Camille Saint-Sa?ns and completed in 1921. The three complementary works are the Sonata for Oboe and Piano in D Major, Op. 166, the Sonata for Clarinet and Piano in E-flat Major, Op. 167, and the Sonata for

  • woodworking (construction)

    Carpentry, the art and trade of cutting, working, and joining timber. The term includes both structural timberwork in framing and items such as doors, windows, and staircases. In the past, when buildings were often wholly constructed of timber framing, the carpenter played a considerable part in

  • Woodworth Personal Data Sheet (psychology)

    personality assessment: Personality inventories: …early self-report inventory, the so-called Woodworth Personal Data Sheet, was developed during World War I to detect soldiers who were emotionally unfit for combat. Among its ostensibly face-valid items were these: Does the sight of blood make you sick or dizzy? Are you happy most of the time? Do you…

  • Woodworth, Robert S. (American psychologist)

    Robert S. Woodworth, American psychologist who conducted major research on learning and developed a system of “dynamic psychology” into which he sought to incorporate several different schools of psychological thought. Woodworth worked as a mathematics instructor before turning to psychology. He

  • Woodworth, Robert Sessions (American psychologist)

    Robert S. Woodworth, American psychologist who conducted major research on learning and developed a system of “dynamic psychology” into which he sought to incorporate several different schools of psychological thought. Woodworth worked as a mathematics instructor before turning to psychology. He

  • Woody Guthrie disease (pathology)

    Huntington disease , a relatively rare, and invariably fatal, hereditary neurological disease that is characterized by irregular and involuntary movements of the muscles and progressive loss of cognitive ability. The disease was first described by American physician George Huntington in 1872.

  • woody nightshade (plant)

    bittersweet: ) or woody nightshade (Solanum dulcamara), belongs to the family Solanaceae. It is an herbaceous vine, up to 4.5 m long; the violet and yellow star-shaped flowers are followed by shiny green berries that gradually turn bright red.

  • woody plant (plant)

    tropical rainforest: Origin: …thought to have been massive, woody plants appropriate for a rainforest habitat. Most of the smaller, more delicate plants that are so widespread in the world today evolved later, ultimately from tropical rainforest ancestors. While it is possible that even earlier forms existed that await discovery, the oldest angiosperm fossils—leaves,…

  • Woody Woodpecker (animated character)

    Walter Lantz: His most famous creation was Woody Woodpecker, who first appeared in a bit part in the cartoon short Knock, Knock (1940) and who became the star of a long-running series of cartoons the following year. Lantz’s wife, Gracie, provided Woody’s voice, and renowned voice artist Mel Blanc originated Woody’s familiar…

  • woof (weaving)

    Filling, in woven fabrics, the widthwise, or horizontal, yarns carried over and under the warp, or lengthwise, yarns and running from selvage to selvage. Filling yarns are generally made with less twist than are warp yarns because they are subjected to less strain in the weaving process and

  • woofer (electroacoustical device)

    loudspeaker: …low-frequency speaker is called a woofer, and the high-frequency speaker is called a tweeter. In many sound reproduction systems a third, or midrange, speaker is also used, and in a few systems there are separate “subwoofers” and “supertweeters” to reproduce the extremities of the audible spectrum.

  • Wooing of Luaine..., The (Irish saga)

    satire: The satiric spirit: Assorted ReferencesdramaEnglish theatreKorean

  • wool (animal fibre)

    Wool, animal fibre forming the protective covering, or fleece, of sheep or of other hairy mammals, such as goats and camels. Prehistoric man, clothing himself with sheepskins, eventually learned to make yarn and fabric from their fibre covering. Selective sheep breeding eliminated most of the

  • Wool Act (United Kingdom [1699])

    American colonies: New shapes of colonial development: The Wool Act of 1699 prohibited the shipment of woolen fabrics across any colonial boundary. The Hat Act of 1732 similarly forbade any colony to export its hats and limited the number of apprentices. Late in the colonial period the Iron Act of 1750 stopped the…

  • wool carder bee (insect)

    Leaf-cutter bee, (family Megachilidae), any of a group of bees (order Hymenoptera), particularly genus Megachile, that differ from most other bees in that they collect pollen on their abdomens rather than on their hind legs. The solitary female, after mating, makes a nest in soil, a hollow plant

  • wool fat (chemical compound)

    Lanolin, purified form of wool grease or wool wax (sometimes erroneously called wool fat), used either alone or with soft paraffin or lard or other fat as a base for ointments, emollients, skin foods, salves, superfatted soaps, and fur dressing. Lanolin, a translucent, yellowish-white, soft,

  • wool grease (chemical compound)

    Lanolin, purified form of wool grease or wool wax (sometimes erroneously called wool fat), used either alone or with soft paraffin or lard or other fat as a base for ointments, emollients, skin foods, salves, superfatted soaps, and fur dressing. Lanolin, a translucent, yellowish-white, soft,

  • Wool Products Labeling Act (United States [1939])

    specialty hair fibre: …the United States, however, the Wool Products Labeling Act (1939) allows the designation of such fibres as “wool” in fibre-content labels.

  • wool wax (chemical compound)

    Lanolin, purified form of wool grease or wool wax (sometimes erroneously called wool fat), used either alone or with soft paraffin or lard or other fat as a base for ointments, emollients, skin foods, salves, superfatted soaps, and fur dressing. Lanolin, a translucent, yellowish-white, soft,

  • Wooldridge, Anna Marie (American vocalist, songwriter, and actress)

    Abbey Lincoln, (Anna Marie Wooldridge; Gaby Lee; Aminata; Moseka), American vocalist, songwriter, and actress (born Aug. 6, 1930, Chicago, Ill.—died Aug. 14, 2010, New York, N.Y.), wrote songs about black culture and civil rights and sang them in a dramatic, evocative style. She grew up in southern

  • Wooldridge, Dean E. (American engineer)

    Simon Ramo: Ramo and fellow engineer Dean E. Wooldridge left Hughes Aircraft in 1953 to form the Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation, obtaining financial support from Thompson Products, Inc. (a manufacturer of parts for aircraft engines). Ramo-Wooldridge had the primary responsibility for developing the Atlas, Titan, and Minuteman ICBMs as well as other missiles…

  • Wooldridge, Ian Edmund (British sportswriter)

    Ian Edmund Wooldridge, (“Woolers”), British sportswriter (born Jan. 14, 1932—died March 4, 2007, London, Eng.), was considered one of England’s best sports journalists, writing with wit and a passionate enthusiasm for sports in a career that lasted almost 60 years (1948–2007). He started as a

  • Wooldridge, Sidney William (British geographer)

    geography: Geography in the United States: …to a leading British geographer, Sidney William Wooldridge, in The Geographer as Scientist: Essays on the Scope and Nature of Geography (1956, reprinted 1969), regional geography aimed

  • Woolf, Arthur (British engineer)

    Arthur Woolf, British engineer who pioneered in the development of the compound steam engine. Woolf began as a carpenter and then worked for the engineer and inventor Joseph Bramah. As engineer for a London brewery, he began experimenting with steam power and patented the Woolf high-pressure

  • Woolf, Douglas (American author)

    Douglas Woolf, American author of gently comic fiction about people unassimilated into materialistic, technological society. The heir of a prominent professional family, Woolf studied at Harvard University (1939–42) before serving in the American Field Service (1942–43) and the Army Air Forces

  • Woolf, Leonard (British writer)

    Leonard Woolf, British man of letters, publisher, political worker, journalist, and internationalist who influenced literary and political life and thought more by his personality than by any one achievement. Woolf’s most enduring accomplishment was probably his autobiography, an expression of the

  • Woolf, Leonard Sidney (British writer)

    Leonard Woolf, British man of letters, publisher, political worker, journalist, and internationalist who influenced literary and political life and thought more by his personality than by any one achievement. Woolf’s most enduring accomplishment was probably his autobiography, an expression of the

  • Woolf, Sir John (British film producer)

    Sir John Woolf, British film and television producer who cofounded (1948) the independent production company Romulus Films Ltd. with his brother, James, and produced such acclaimed motion pictures as Pandora and the Flying Dutchman, The African Queen, Moulin Rouge, I Am a Camera, Richard III, Beat

  • Woolf, Virginia (British writer)

    Virginia Woolf, English writer whose novels, through their nonlinear approaches to narrative, exerted a major influence on the genre. While she is best known for her novels, especially Mrs. Dalloway (1925) and To the Lighthouse (1927), Woolf also wrote pioneering essays on artistic theory, literary

  • Woolfe, H. Bruce (British film director)

    documentary film: …same time, the British director H. Bruce Woolfe reconstructed battles of World War I in a series of compilation films, a type of documentary that bases an interpretation of history on factual news material. The German Kulturfilme, such as the feature-length film Wege zu Kraft und Sch?nheit (1925; Ways to…

  • woolflower (plant)

    Celosia: …ornamentals and are sometimes called woolflowers for their dense chaffy flower spikes that somewhat glisten. Lagos spinach, or silver cockscomb (C. argentea), is an important food crop in West Africa, where it is grown for its nutritious leafy greens.

  • Woolgar, Steve (British sociologist)

    Bruno Latour: …Laboratory Life (1979), written with Steven Woolgar, a sociologist, was the result of more than a year spent observing molecular biologists at the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences in La Jolla, California. Latour and Woolgar’s account broke away from the positivist view of scientific inquiry as a rational and largely…

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