<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Yahgan (people)

    Yámana, South American Indian people, very few in number, who were the traditional occupants of the south coast of Tierra del Fuego and the neighbouring islands south to Cape Horn. In the 19th century they numbered between 2,500 and 3,000. The Yámana language forms a distinct linguistic group m

  • Yahia, pas de chance (work by Farès)

    Nabile Farès: In his first novel, Yahia, pas de chance (1970; “Yahia, No Chance”), Farès introduced a quest that was to haunt his later works; the search for the self takes him back to his childhood and, further still, to the pre-Islamic voices of inspiration tied to the earth. Farès’s successive…

  • Yahoo (fictional character)

    Houyhnhnm: …are contrasted with the monstrous Yahoos, members of a brutish humanoid race that the Houyhnhnms have tamed into submission.

  • Yahoo! (American company)

    Yahoo!, global Internet services provider based in Sunnyvale, California, and owned by Verizon Communications since 2017. It was founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, graduate students at Stanford University in California. Yahoo! provides users with online utilities, information, and access

  • Yahoo! Inc. (American company)

    Yahoo!, global Internet services provider based in Sunnyvale, California, and owned by Verizon Communications since 2017. It was founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, graduate students at Stanford University in California. Yahoo! provides users with online utilities, information, and access

  • yahrzeit (Judaism)

    Yahrzeit, (Yiddish: “year time”) in Judaism, the anniversary of the death of a parent or close relative, most commonly observed by burning a candle for an entire day. On the anniversary, a male (or female, in Reform and Conservative congregations) usually recites the Qaddish (doxology) in the

  • Yahuar Huacac (Inca emperor)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The beginnings of external expansion: …of sons, one of whom, Yahuar Huacac (Yawar Waqaq), was kidnapped by a neighbouring group when he was about eight years old. The boy’s mother, Mama Mikay, was a Huayllaca (Wayllaqa) woman who had been promised to the leader of another group called the Ayarmaca (’Ayarmaka). When the promise was…

  • Yahweh

    Yahweh, the god of the Israelites, whose name was revealed to Moses as four Hebrew consonants (YHWH) called the tetragrammaton. After the Babylonian Exile (6th century bce), and especially from the 3rd century bce on, Jews ceased to use the name Yahweh for two reasons. As Judaism became a universal

  • Yahweh, the God of Israel, Garden of

    Garden of Eden, in the Old Testament Book of Genesis, biblical earthly paradise inhabited by the first created man and woman, Adam and Eve, prior to their expulsion for disobeying the commandments of God. It is also called in Genesis the Garden of Yahweh, the God of Israel, and, in Ezekiel, the

  • Yahwist source (biblical criticism)

    Yahwist source, (labeled J after the German transliteration of YHWH), an early source that provides a strand of the Pentateuchal narrative. The basis for identifying a strand of the Pentateuch as the writing of the Yahwist—the Yahwist strand being represented specifically in Genesis 2–16, 18–22,

  • Ya?yā (imām of Yemen)

    Ya?yā, Zaydī imam of Yemen from 1904 to 1948. When Ya?yā was a child, Yemen was a province of the Ottoman Empire. His youth was spent in the service of his father’s administration, and, when his father died in 1904, Ya?yā succeeded him as imam. The Yemenis had always resented Turkish rule, and

  • Ya?yā (Jewish prophet and Christian saint)

    St. John the Baptist, ; feast day June 24), Jewish prophet of priestly origin who preached the imminence of God’s Final Judgment and baptized those who repented in self-preparation for it; he is revered in the Christian church as the forerunner of Jesus Christ. After a period of desert solitude,

  • Ya?yā al-Ma?mūn (Dhū an-Nūnid ruler)

    Dhū an-Nūnid Dynasty: His son Ya?yā al-Ma?mūn (reigned 1043–75) allied with Christians several times against his Muslim enemies and even entertained King Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon at his court (1072). In 1065 al-Ma?mūn seized the ?āmirid capital of Valencia and in 1074–75 was able to take Córdoba, the…

  • Ya?yā al-Mu?talī (?ammūdid ruler)

    ?ammūdid dynasty: …Berbers, however, induced ?Alī’s son Ya?yā al-Mu?talī to take Córdoba and proclaimed him caliph in 1021, only to drive him out in 1022. Al-Qāsim returned that year, but he too was forced out in 1023. Ya?yā, now ruler of Málaga, was invited back to Córdoba in 1025, but by this…

  • Ya?yā al-Qādir (Dhū an-Nūnid ruler)

    Dhū an-Nūnid Dynasty: But Ya?yā al-Qādir (reigned 1075–92), al-Ma?mūn’s grandson, soon lost both Valencia and Córdoba. An alliance with Alfonso VI hastened the end of the Dhū an-Nūnid kingdom: while al-Qādir was briefly restored to Toledo, he bargained away his capital to the Christians in return for Valencia (1085),…

  • Ya?yā ibn Ibrāhīm (Berber leader)

    Almoravids: …Islamic doctrine by their leader Ya?yā ibn Ibrāhīm and the Moroccan theologian ?Abd Allāh ibn Yasīn. Under Abū Bakr al-Lamtūnī and later Yūsuf ibn Tāshufīn, the Almoravids merged their religious reform fervour with the conquest of Morocco and western Algeria as far as Algiers between 1054 and 1092. They established…

  • Ya?yā ibn Khalid (?Abbāsid vizier)

    al-Wāqidī: Ya?yā ibn Khalid, the vizier there, gave him money and, some reports say, made him qā?ī (religious judge) of the western district of the city. In 819 al-Wāqidī was appointed qā?ī of Rusafah on the east side by the caliph al-Ma?mūn, who was his close…

  • Ya?yā ibn Ma?mūd al-Wāsi?ī (Iraqi painter)

    Ya?yā ibn Ma?mūd al-Wāsi?ī, Muslim painter and illustrator who produced work of originality and excellence. He was the outstanding painter of the Baghdad school of illustration, which blended Turkish art and native Christian (probably Jacobite or Syriac Miaphysite) painting in a lively Islamic

  • Ya?yā ibn Mu?ammad (imām of Yemen)

    Ya?yā, Zaydī imam of Yemen from 1904 to 1948. When Ya?yā was a child, Yemen was a province of the Ottoman Empire. His youth was spent in the service of his father’s administration, and, when his father died in 1904, Ya?yā succeeded him as imam. The Yemenis had always resented Turkish rule, and

  • Ya?yā Ma?mūd al-Mutawakkil (imām of Yemen)

    Ya?yā, Zaydī imam of Yemen from 1904 to 1948. When Ya?yā was a child, Yemen was a province of the Ottoman Empire. His youth was spent in the service of his father’s administration, and, when his father died in 1904, Ya?yā succeeded him as imam. The Yemenis had always resented Turkish rule, and

  • Ya?yā ?ob?-e Azal, Mīrzā (Iranian religious leader)

    Mīrzā Ya?yā ?ob?-e Azal, half brother of Bahā? Ullāh (the founder of the Bahā?ī faith) and leader of his own Bābist movement in the mid-19th century Ottoman Empire. Ya?yā was the designated successor of Sayyid Alī Mu?ammad, a Shī?ī sectarian leader known as the Bāb (Arabic: “gate,” referring to one

  • Ya?yā the Barmakid (?Abbāsid vizier)

    al-Wāqidī: Ya?yā ibn Khalid, the vizier there, gave him money and, some reports say, made him qā?ī (religious judge) of the western district of the city. In 819 al-Wāqidī was appointed qā?ī of Rusafah on the east side by the caliph al-Ma?mūn, who was his close…

  • Yaik Cossack (people)

    Cossack: …the Greben (in Caucasia), the Yaik (on the middle Ural River), the Volga, the Dnieper, and the Zaporozhian (mainly west of the Dnieper).

  • Yaik River (river, Central Asia)

    Ural River, river in Russia and Kazakhstan. The Ural is 1,509 miles (2,428 km) long and drains an area of 91,500 square miles (237,000 square km). It rises in the Ural Mountains near Mount Kruglaya and flows south along their eastern flank past Magnitogorsk. At Orsk it cuts westward across the

  • Yaitsky Gorodok (Kazakhstan)

    Oral, city, western Kazakhstan, along the Ural (Zhayyq) River. Founded in 1613 or 1622 by Cossacks fleeing a tsarist punitive campaign, it was known as Yaitsky Gorodok until 1775, when its name was changed following the Pugachov Rebellion. The town was a centre of both the Stenka Razin (1667) and

  • Yaizu (Japan)

    Yaizu, city, Shizuoka ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, on the west coast of Suruga Bay. Since the Tokugawa era (1603–1867), Yaizu has been one of the important coastal fishing ports for tuna, bonito, skipjack, and mackerel. Canning and freezing plants operate there. Deep-sea fishing developed in

  • Yāj (Islamic mythology)

    Yājūj and Mājūj, in Islamic eschatology, two hostile, corrupt forces that will ravage the earth before the end of the world. They are the counterparts of Gog and Magog in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian New Testament. They are mentioned in suras 18 and 21 of the Qur?ān, the holy book of Islam.

  • Yāj and Mājūj (Islamic mythology)

    Yājūj and Mājūj, in Islamic eschatology, two hostile, corrupt forces that will ravage the earth before the end of the world. They are the counterparts of Gog and Magog in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian New Testament. They are mentioned in suras 18 and 21 of the Qur?ān, the holy book of Islam.

  • yajé (drug)

    Ayahuasca, hallucinogenic drink made from the stem and bark of the tropical liana Banisteriopsis caapi and other botanical ingredients. First formulated by indigenous South Americans of the Amazon basin, ayahuasca is now used in many parts of the world. Some users experience visions and sensations,

  • yaj?a (Hinduism)

    Yajna, (Sanskrit: “sacrifice”) in Hinduism, offerings to the gods based on rites prescribed in the earliest scriptures of ancient India, the Vedas, in contrast to puja, a later practice that may include image worship and other devotional practices. A yajna is always purposeful, even though the aim

  • yajna (Hinduism)

    Yajna, (Sanskrit: “sacrifice”) in Hinduism, offerings to the gods based on rites prescribed in the earliest scriptures of ancient India, the Vedas, in contrast to puja, a later practice that may include image worship and other devotional practices. A yajna is always purposeful, even though the aim

  • Yajnashri Shatakarni (Satavahana ruler)

    India: The Andhras and their successors: …the important Andhra kings was Yajnashri Shatakarni, who ruled at the end of the 2nd century ce and asserted his authority over the Shakas. The 3rd century saw the decline of Satavahana power, as the kingdom broke into small pockets of control under various branches of the family.

  • Yajnavalkya (Indian sage)

    Yajnavalkya, sage and teacher who figures prominently in the earliest of the Hindu philosophical and metaphysical texts known as the Upanishads, the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad. The teachings attributed to Yajnavalkya include many that are representative of the break with earlier Vedic ritualism and

  • yaj?opavīta (Hinduism)

    upanayana: …and the sacred thread (upavita, or yajnopavita). The thread, consisting of a loop made of three symbolically knotted and twisted strands of cotton cord, is replaced regularly so that it is worn throughout the lifetime of the owner, normally over the left shoulder and diagonally across the chest to…

  • Yājūj and Mājūj (Islamic mythology)

    Yājūj and Mājūj, in Islamic eschatology, two hostile, corrupt forces that will ravage the earth before the end of the world. They are the counterparts of Gog and Magog in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian New Testament. They are mentioned in suras 18 and 21 of the Qur?ān, the holy book of Islam.

  • Yajurveda (Hindu literature)

    Yajurveda, collection of mantras (sacred formulas) and verses that forms part of the ancient sacred literature of India known as the Vedas. See

  • Yak (airplane)

    Aleksandr Sergeyevich Yakovlev: …noted for his series of Yak aircraft, most of them fighters used by the Soviet Union in World War II.

  • yak (mammal)

    Yak, (Bos grunniens), long-haired, short-legged oxlike mammal that was probably domesticated in Tibet but has been introduced wherever there are people at elevations of 4,000–6,000 metres (14,000–20,000 feet), mainly in China but also in Central Asia, Mongolia, and Nepal. Wild yaks are sometimes

  • Yaka (people)

    Yaka, a people inhabiting the wooded plateau and savanna areas between the Kwango and Wamba rivers in southwestern Congo (Kinshasa) directly bordering Angola on the west. Their origins are not certain, and Yaka is now an ethnic name given to the people of several heritages, including those related

  • Yakama (people)

    Yakama, North American Indian tribe that lived along the Columbia, Yakima, and Wenatchee rivers in what is now the south-central region of the U.S. state of Washington. As with many other Sahaptin-speaking Plateau Indians, the Yakama were primarily salmon fishers before colonization. In the early

  • Yakama Indian Wars (North American history)

    Yakama: …acquired historical distinction in the Yakama Indian Wars (1855–58), an attempt by the tribe to resist U.S. forces intent upon clearing the Washington Territory for prospectors and settlers. The conflict stemmed from a treaty that had been negotiated in 1855, according to which the Yakama and 13 other tribes (identified…

  • Yakan (people)

    Yakan, ethnic group living primarily on Basilan Island but also on Sacol, Malanipa, and Tumalutab islands, all off the southern tip of the Zamboanga Peninsula, in the southern Philippines. Smaller groups of Yakan live elsewhere in the Philippines—particularly on the island of Mindanao—as well as in

  • yakazu haikai (Japanese competition)

    Japan: Commerce, cities, and culture: He was especially skilled at yakazu haikai, a competition to compose as many haikai as possible within a fixed period of time that derived its name from a popular arrow-shooting competition (yakazu). Saikaku set a new record by composing 23,500 haikai in a single day and night—one verse every four…

  • Yakety Yak (song by Leiber and Stoller)

    the Coasters: …“Young Blood” (both 1957), “Yakety Yak” (1958), and “Charlie Brown” and “Poison Ivy” (both 1959). The Coasters alternated lead singers and featured clever arrangements, including amusing bass replies and tenor saxophone solos by King Curtis, who played a crucial role in creating Atlantic’s rhythm-and-blues sound. With further personnel changes…

  • Yaki (people)

    Central America: Pre-Columbian Central America: …coast, notable especially among the Pipil of El Salvador and the Chorotega and Nicarao of Nicaragua. In Panama and Costa Rica, South American Chibcha influence was prevalent, while Caribbean cultural patterns penetrated the coastal plain from Panama to Honduras. Fugitives from the European conquistadores in the Caribbean increased this influence…

  • Yakī būd yakī nabūd (work by Jamalzadah)

    Muhammad ?Ali Jamalzadah: …was reprinted in 1921/22 in Yakī būd yakī nabūd (Once Upon a Time), a collection of his short stories that laid the foundation for modern Persian prose. Yakī būd yakī nabūd caused a great stir, not only because of its innovative prose style, modern diction, and its use of colloquial…

  • Yakima (Washington, United States)

    Yakima, city, seat (1886) of Yakima county, south-central Washington, U.S., on the Yakima River. In 1884 the Northern Pacific Railway selected the site of Yakima City (now Union Gap) as a construction headquarters. This plan was abandoned and a new settlement, known as North Yakima, was established

  • Yakima (people)

    Yakama, North American Indian tribe that lived along the Columbia, Yakima, and Wenatchee rivers in what is now the south-central region of the U.S. state of Washington. As with many other Sahaptin-speaking Plateau Indians, the Yakama were primarily salmon fishers before colonization. In the early

  • Yakima River (river, Washington, United States)

    Yakima River, river, south-central Washington, U.S., rising in the Cascade Range, near Snoqualmie Pass. It flows southeastward about 200 miles (320 km) past Ellensburg and Yakima to join the Columbia River near Kennewick in Benton county. The Yakima and its tributaries irrigate about 460,000 acres

  • Yakini, Abraham ha- (Jewish Kabbalist)

    Shabbetai Tzevi: …forceful Jewish preacher and Kabbalist, Abraham ha-Yakini, who possessed a false prophetic document affirming that Shabbetai was the messiah. Shabbetai then traveled to Palestine and after that to Cairo, where he won over to his cause Raphael Halebi, the wealthy and powerful treasurer of the Turkish governor.

  • Yak? (people)

    Yak?, people of the Cross River region of eastern Nigeria; they speak Luko, a language of the Benue-Congo branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Yak? are mainly yam farmers; subsidiary crops include cocoyams (taro), corn (maize), okra, and pumpkin. The main cash crop is palm oil. The Yak? occupy

  • Yako (people)

    Yak?, people of the Cross River region of eastern Nigeria; they speak Luko, a language of the Benue-Congo branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Yak? are mainly yam farmers; subsidiary crops include cocoyams (taro), corn (maize), okra, and pumpkin. The main cash crop is palm oil. The Yak? occupy

  • Yakoba (Nigeria)

    Bauchi, town, capital of Bauchi state and traditional emirate, northeastern Nigeria. Bauchi town lies on the railroad from Maiduguri to Kafanchan (where it joins the line to Port Harcourt) and has road connections to Jos, Kano, and Maiduguri. The emirate was founded (1800–10) by Yakubu, one of

  • Yakonan languages

    Penutian languages: …Costanoan languages), Sahaptin (two languages), Yakonan (two extinct languages), Yokutsan (three languages), and Maiduan (four languages)—plus Klamath-Modoc, Cayuse (extinct), Molale (extinct), Coos, Takelma (extinct), Kalapuya, Chinook (not to be

  • Yakov Pasynkov (work by Turgenev)

    Ivan Turgenev: First novels: …such extended character studies as Yakov Pasynkov (1855) and the subtle if pessimistic examinations of the contrariness of love found in “Faust” and “A Correspondence” (1856). Time and national events, moreover, were impinging upon him. With the defeat of Russia in the Crimean War (1854–56), Turgenev’s own generation, “the men…

  • Yakovlev, Aleksandr N. (Soviet economist and official)

    Aleksandr Nikolayevich Yakovlev, Soviet Russian historian and government adviser (born Dec. 2, 1923, Korolyovo, Yaroslavl oblast, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now in Russia]—died Oct. 18, 2005, Moscow, Russia), was an important ally of Soviet Pres. Mikhail Gorbachev and a principal architect of glasnost (

  • Yakovlev, Aleksandr Nikolayevich (Soviet economist and official)

    Aleksandr Nikolayevich Yakovlev, Soviet Russian historian and government adviser (born Dec. 2, 1923, Korolyovo, Yaroslavl oblast, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now in Russia]—died Oct. 18, 2005, Moscow, Russia), was an important ally of Soviet Pres. Mikhail Gorbachev and a principal architect of glasnost (

  • Yakovlev, Aleksandr Sergeyevich (Soviet aircraft designer)

    Aleksandr Sergeyevich Yakovlev, aircraft designer noted for his series of Yak aircraft, most of them fighters used by the Soviet Union in World War II. After graduation from the Air Force Engineering Academy in 1931, Yakovlev immediately began to design aircraft, both piston- and jet-engined. Just

  • Yakovlev, Anatoly A. (Soviet official)

    Julius Rosenberg and Ethel Rosenberg: …who then passed it to Anatoly A. Yakovlev, the Soviet Union’s vice-consul in New York City.

  • yaksa (Hindu mythology)

    Yaksha, in the mythology of India, a class of generally benevolent but sometimes mischievous, capricious, sexually rapacious, or even murderous nature spirits who are the custodians of treasures that are hidden in the earth and in the roots of trees. They are powerful magicians and shape-shifters.

  • yaksha (Hindu mythology)

    Yaksha, in the mythology of India, a class of generally benevolent but sometimes mischievous, capricious, sexually rapacious, or even murderous nature spirits who are the custodians of treasures that are hidden in the earth and in the roots of trees. They are powerful magicians and shape-shifters.

  • Yaksha Malla (Nepalese ruler)

    Nepal: Middle period: Jaya Sthiti’s successor, Yaksha Malla (reigned c. 1429–c. 1482), divided his kingdom among his three sons, thus creating the independent principalities of Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur (Bhadgaon) in the valley. Each of these states controlled territory in the surrounding hill areas, with particular importance attached to the trade…

  • yakshagana (Indian dance-drama)

    Yakshagana, dance-drama of South India, associated most strongly with the state of Karnataka. Elaborate and colourful costumes, makeup, and masks constitute some of the most-striking features of the art form. Traditionally, yakshagana was performed in the open air by all-male troupes sponsored by

  • yakshi (Hindu mythology)

    Yaksha, in the mythology of India, a class of generally benevolent but sometimes mischievous, capricious, sexually rapacious, or even murderous nature spirits who are the custodians of treasures that are hidden in the earth and in the roots of trees. They are powerful magicians and shape-shifters.

  • yak?ī (Hindu mythology)

    Yaksha, in the mythology of India, a class of generally benevolent but sometimes mischievous, capricious, sexually rapacious, or even murderous nature spirits who are the custodians of treasures that are hidden in the earth and in the roots of trees. They are powerful magicians and shape-shifters.

  • yak?inī (Hindu mythology)

    Yaksha, in the mythology of India, a class of generally benevolent but sometimes mischievous, capricious, sexually rapacious, or even murderous nature spirits who are the custodians of treasures that are hidden in the earth and in the roots of trees. They are powerful magicians and shape-shifters.

  • Yaku Island (island, Japan)

    Japan: Flora: …2,300 feet (700 metres) on Yaku Island, south of Kyushu.

  • Yakub Beg (Muslim adventurer)

    Yakub Beg, Muslim adventurer of Tajik or Uzbek descent who entered northwestern China in 1864 and through a series of military and political maneuvers took advantage of the anti-Chinese uprisings of its Muslim inhabitants to establish himself as head of the kingdom of Kashgaria (centred at

  • Yakuba (African people)

    Dan, an ethnolinguistic grouping of people inhabiting the mountainous west-central C?te d’Ivoire and adjacent areas of Liberia. The Dan belong to the Southern branch of the Mande linguistic subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family. They originated somewhere to the west or northwest of their

  • Yakubu (emir of Bauchi)

    Bauchi: …emirate was founded (1800–10) by Yakubu, one of Sheikh Usman dan Fodio’s commanders. Yakubu conquered a sparsely wooded savanna region (the Bauchi High Plains) mainly inhabited by non-Muslim peoples. After successful campaigns, he founded (1809) the town of Bauchi. Yakubu built the town’s walls, the circumference of which measures 6.5…

  • Yakubu, Balaraba Ramat (Nigerian author)

    African literature: Hausa: … [1997; “Agree with Me”]) and Balaraba Ramat Yakubu (Budurwar zuciya [1987; “Young at Heart”], Alhaki kuykuyo ne [1990; “Retribution Is Inescapable”], and Wa zai auri jahila? [1990; “Who Will Marry the Ignorant Woman?”]). These works deal with the experiences of Hausa women and address such subjects as polygamy, women and…

  • Yakult Swallows (Japanese baseball team)

    Central League: Hanshin Tigers, Hiroshima Tōyō Carp, Tokyo Yakult Swallows, Yokohama BayStars, and Yomiuri (Tokyo) Giants. The regular playing season culminates in the Japan Series, a seven-game series between the respective champion teams of the Pacific and Central leagues.

  • Yakup (Armenian actor)

    Islamic arts: Turkey: …company headed by an Armenian, Agop, who was later converted to Islam and changed his name to Yakup. For almost 20 years the Gedik Pa?a Theatre was the dramatic centre of the city. Plays in translation were soon followed by original plays, several with a nationalist appeal, such as Nam?k…

  • Yakurr (people)

    Yak?, people of the Cross River region of eastern Nigeria; they speak Luko, a language of the Benue-Congo branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Yak? are mainly yam farmers; subsidiary crops include cocoyams (taro), corn (maize), okra, and pumpkin. The main cash crop is palm oil. The Yak? occupy

  • Yakusha butai-no-sugatae (prints by Utagawa Toyokuni)

    Utagawa Toyokuni: His “Yakusha butai-no-sugatae” (“Portraits of Actors in Their Various Roles”), a series of large nishiki-e, or polychrome prints, created between 1794 and 1796, marked the peak of his creative work. His drawing for wood-block prints was characterized by the use of powerful and vivid lines that…

  • Yakushi Buddha (Buddhism)

    Bhaishajya-guru, in Mahayana Buddhism, the healing buddha (“enlightened one”), widely worshipped in Tibet, China, and Japan. According to popular belief in those countries, some illnesses are effectively cured by merely touching his image or calling out his name. More serious illnesses, however,

  • Yakushi Nyorai (Buddhism)

    Bhaishajya-guru, in Mahayana Buddhism, the healing buddha (“enlightened one”), widely worshipped in Tibet, China, and Japan. According to popular belief in those countries, some illnesses are effectively cured by merely touching his image or calling out his name. More serious illnesses, however,

  • Yakushi Temple (temple complex, Nara, Japan)

    Yakushi-ji, temple complex dedicated to Yakushi, the Healing Buddha, in Nara, Japan. It was established about 690 outside Nara, and in 718 it was refounded within the city. The only one of the original buildings to have survived is the three-storied eastern pagoda, which is one of the finest

  • Yakushi Triad (Japanese sculpture)

    Japanese art: Sculpture: Known as the Yakushi Triad, the work consists of the seated Yakushi Buddha flanked by the standing attendants Nikkō (Suryaprabha, bodhisattva of the Sun) and Gakkō (Candraprabha, bodhisattva of the Moon). It is unclear whether these sculptures were produced after the temple’s relocation to Nara or if they…

  • Yakushi-ji (temple complex, Nara, Japan)

    Yakushi-ji, temple complex dedicated to Yakushi, the Healing Buddha, in Nara, Japan. It was established about 690 outside Nara, and in 718 it was refounded within the city. The only one of the original buildings to have survived is the three-storied eastern pagoda, which is one of the finest

  • Yakut (people)

    Sakha, one of the major peoples of eastern Siberia, numbering some 380,000 in the late 20th century. In the 17th century they inhabited a limited area on the middle Lena River, but in modern times they expanded throughout Sakha republic (Yakutia) in far northeastern Russia. They speak a Turkic

  • Yakut A. S. S. R. (republic, Russia)

    Sakha, republic in far northeastern Russia, in northeastern Siberia. The republic occupies the basins of the great rivers flowing to the Arctic Ocean—the Lena, Yana, Indigirka, and Kolyma—and includes the New Siberian Islands between the Laptev and East Siberian seas. Sakha was created an

  • Yakut language

    Sakha language, member of the Turkic subfamily of the Altaic language family, spoken in northeastern Siberia (Sakha republic), in northeastern Russia. Because its speakers have been geographically isolated from other Turkic languages for centuries, Sakha has developed deviant features; it

  • Yakut moose (mammal)

    moose: alces alces); the Siberian, or Yakut, moose (A. alces pfizenmayeri); the west Siberian, or Ussuri, moose (A. alces cameloides); and the east Siberian, or Kolyma, moose (A. alces buturlini). In addition to differences in geographical distribution, the different subspecies of moose are further distinguished by features such as…

  • Yakut-Sakha (republic, Russia)

    Sakha, republic in far northeastern Russia, in northeastern Siberia. The republic occupies the basins of the great rivers flowing to the Arctic Ocean—the Lena, Yana, Indigirka, and Kolyma—and includes the New Siberian Islands between the Laptev and East Siberian seas. Sakha was created an

  • Yakutia (republic, Russia)

    Sakha, republic in far northeastern Russia, in northeastern Siberia. The republic occupies the basins of the great rivers flowing to the Arctic Ocean—the Lena, Yana, Indigirka, and Kolyma—and includes the New Siberian Islands between the Laptev and East Siberian seas. Sakha was created an

  • Yakutiya (republic, Russia)

    Sakha, republic in far northeastern Russia, in northeastern Siberia. The republic occupies the basins of the great rivers flowing to the Arctic Ocean—the Lena, Yana, Indigirka, and Kolyma—and includes the New Siberian Islands between the Laptev and East Siberian seas. Sakha was created an

  • Yakutsk (Russia)

    Yakutsk, city and capital of Sakha republic (Yakutia), in far northeastern Russia, on the Lena River. A fort was founded on the Lena’s low right bank in 1632 and transferred 43 miles (70 km) upstream to the present site of Yakutsk in 1642. Long a small provincial centre of wooden houses where,

  • yakuza (Japanese organized crime)

    Yakuza, Japanese gangsters, members of what are formally called bōryokudan (“violence groups”), or Mafia-like criminal organizations. In Japan and elsewhere, especially in the West, the term yakuza can be used to refer to individual gangsters or criminals as well as to their organized groups and to

  • Yakuza, The (film by Pollack [1974])

    Sydney Pollack: Film directing: …from that romantic blockbuster with The Yakuza (1974), a post-noir thriller about Japanese gangsters written by Paul Schrader and Robert Towne; Robert Mitchum played a private eye who travels to Japan to rescue an American girl kidnapped by yakuza. Pollack had greater commercial success with Three Days of the Condor…

  • Yala (Thailand)

    Yala, town, extreme southern Thailand. Yala is a modern commercial centre on the Pattani River, which flows north into the Gulf of Thailand. The town is also located on the Bangkok-Singapore railway and the Pattani–George Town (Penang [Malaysia]) highway. The population includes Thai Muslims, Malay

  • Yalag (Russian writer)

    Judah Leib Gordon, Jewish poet, essayist, and novelist, the leading poet of the Hebrew Enlightenment (Haskala), whose use of biblical and postbiblical Hebrew resulted in a new and influential style of Hebrew-language poetry. After he left Lithuania, Gordon was imprisoned as a political conspirator

  • Yale Bowl (stadium, New Haven, Connecticut, United States)

    stadium: Modern stadiums: …bowl, first employed in the Yale Bowl at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1914, and repeated in several other stadiums, including the Rose Bowl and Michigan Stadium. Because the bowl is entirely unsuited to the other principal American sport, baseball, another type of American stadium has evolved for baseball, in which…

  • Yale College (university, New Haven, Connecticut, United States)

    Yale University, private university in New Haven, Connecticut, one of the Ivy League schools. It was founded in 1701 and is the third oldest university in the United States. Yale was originally chartered by the colonial legislature of Connecticut as the Collegiate School and was held at

  • Yale Laboratories of Primate Biology (research centre, Florida, United States)

    Robert M. Yerkes: …of behaviour, it was renamed Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology after his resignation as director in 1941. Chimpanzees (1943), his other major work, was also his last. He retired from his teaching post at Yale in 1944.

  • Yale lock

    lock: Development of modern types.: …made by an American, Linus Yale, who patented a pin tumbler lock working on an adaptation of the ancient Egyptian principle. In the 1860s his son Linus Yale, Jr., evolved the Yale cylinder lock, with its small, flat key with serrated edge, now probably the most familiar lock and key…

  • Yale romanization system (language)

    Korean language: Writing and transcriptions: …sentences, many linguists prefer the Yale romanization, which more accurately reflects the Korean orthography and avoids the need for diacritics to mark vowel distinctions. For a comparison of the two systems, see the Table

  • Yale School (American literary critics)

    Yale school, group of literary critics at Yale University, who became known in the 1970s and ’80s for their deconstructionist theories. The Yale school’s skeptical, relativistic brand of criticism drew inspiration from the work of French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Its most prominent members were

  • Yale School of Drama (school, New Haven, Connecticut, United States)

    George Pierce Baker: …and technique of drama at Yale University, founding a drama school there and directing the university theatre. Many innovative techniques in theatre, motion-picture, and television production had their origins in his work at Yale. Of his writings, the best known are The Development of Shakespeare as a Dramatist (1907) and…

  • Yale Scientific Expedition (American paleontological organization)

    Othniel Charles Marsh: …1870 he organized the first Yale Scientific Expedition, which explored the Pliocene deposits (2.6–5.3 million years old) of Nebraska and the Miocene deposits (5.3–23 million years old) of northern Colorado. Marsh continued to sponsor similar parties nearly every year thereafter until his death. In 1871 his party discovered the first…

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看